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View Full Version : Intro to Internal Strength Seminar by Mike Sigman, March 14-15, Washington DC


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Haowen Chan
01-21-2009, 09:18 PM
Mike Sigman will be in Washington, D.C., on Saturday and Sunday March 14-15, 2009, for an informal workshop devoted to an examination of the theory and practice of training internal strength.

Mr Sigman will introduce two-person and solo exercises focused developing internal strength or jin in all directions. Breathing and structural-development exercises will be taught. Developmental and practice exercises for later use and suggested training approaches will also be part of the syllabus. No prior martial arts experience is necessary and participants of all backgrounds are welcome.

Workshop Dates and Times:
March 14-15, 2009
12 p.m. - 7 p.m. Saturday
11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday

Location:
Northwest Sport & Health
4001 Brandywine Street N.W.
Washington D.C. 20016
Ph: 202-244-6090
http://www.sportandhealth.com/club.aspx?id=438&sn=92

Fees:
Both Days: $165.00
Saturday Only*: $100.00
*Sunday only participation is not an option
On-site registration is not offered.

Reservations and Deposits Required by February 14, 2009.
First come, First served.
Payment in full due by March 1, 2009
The seminar will be limited to ~30 participants.

To reserve:
Email: dana@wkadojo.com with "Mike Sigman Seminar" in the subject line.
Payment and registration details will follow RSVP by email.

Stephen Kotev
02-02-2009, 02:14 PM
Mike,

I am looking forward to this. I sent in my registration today. I missed your last few trips to DC/PA because of business and I am glad I'll finally be able to meet you in person. I followed the dialogue for ages and I am looking forward to building my own personal experience on this topic.

Regards,
Stephen Kotev

Mike Sigman
02-02-2009, 04:35 PM
I'll look forward to it, Steve. The DC workshop is going to be an oddball one because there will be people there with varying levels of skills and/or levels of academic knowledge of the principles. So I'm not sure what to do past the mandatory "you must know this" stuff (3/4 to 1 day, depending). At that point in time I'll try to get into what I personally think are the best long-term development exercises, but I'm open to exploring other "how do you do this one?" tangents. I.e., pretty laid-back and impulsive, as long as the basics get done.

Oh yeah, I forgot. Because of the odd hours, I'll try to squeeze in on Sunday morning some instructions on my most common exercise, which uses a foam "pool-noodle". It's a whole-body conditioning exercise that uses continuous windings of the body; a continuous "silk-reeling" exercise. So you may need to get a pool-noodle, if you're interested in doing it. One of those typical 2.5-inch diameter ones, smoothe cylinder, small hole down the middle. Probably cost $3-$4 at Wal-mart or etc. We'll need to cut them down to 44-45-inches in length. This will be the "Tube Snake Boogie". ;)

Best.

Mike

Bob Blackburn
02-02-2009, 09:47 PM
Hi Mike,

I just RSVP'd for Saturday. I'm looking forward to "you must know this" and have something to work on.

If anyone wants to carpool from Philly, let me know.

Bob

Mike Sigman
02-02-2009, 10:09 PM
Hi Mike,

I just RSVP'd for Saturday. I'm looking forward to "you must know this" and have something to work on.

If anyone wants to carpool from Philly, let me know.
Hi Bob:

It will be a pleasure to meet you. ;)

Best.

Mike

Stephen Kotev
02-26-2009, 08:55 AM
I'll look forward to it, Steve. The DC workshop is going to be an oddball one because there will be people there with varying levels of skills and/or levels of academic knowledge of the principles. So I'm not sure what to do past the mandatory "you must know this" stuff (3/4 to 1 day, depending). At that point in time I'll try to get into what I personally think are the best long-term development exercises, but I'm open to exploring other "how do you do this one?" tangents. I.e., pretty laid-back and impulsive, as long as the basics get done.

Oh yeah, I forgot. Because of the odd hours, I'll try to squeeze in on Sunday morning some instructions on my most common exercise, which uses a foam "pool-noodle". It's a whole-body conditioning exercise that uses continuous windings of the body; a continuous "silk-reeling" exercise. So you may need to get a pool-noodle, if you're interested in doing it. One of those typical 2.5-inch diameter ones, smoothe cylinder, small hole down the middle. Probably cost $3-$4 at Wal-mart or etc. We'll need to cut them down to 44-45-inches in length. This will be the "Tube Snake Boogie". ;)

Best.

Mike

Mike,

I tore my calf muscle in mid-January and I am still recovering. I am hoping that I'll be healed up by the time of your seminar. My concern is that I may not be able to fully participate. I am slowly improving but I still have a limp and my leg can't carry a full load yet.

What do you think?

Thanks,
Stephen

Mike Sigman
02-26-2009, 09:03 AM
I tore my calf muscle in mid-January and I am still recovering. I am hoping that I'll be healed up by the time of your seminar. My concern is that I may not be able to fully participate. I am slowly improving but I still have a limp and my leg can't carry a full load yet.

What do you think?
It shouldn't be much of a problem, Stephen. Most of what we do are gradually more-sophisticated 2-person exercises that take no falling or hard physical effort. It's more like a linear development of skills, but at low effort. People who have, e.g., a weak knee, I simply tell them to use only the other position that doesn't strain the knee. The workshop is more about "how to do" something rather than a physically challenging regimen that puts people through the paces. ;)

Best.

Mike

Stephen Kotev
02-26-2009, 10:25 AM
It shouldn't be much of a problem, Stephen. Most of what we do are gradually more-sophisticated 2-person exercises that take no falling or hard physical effort. It's more like a linear development of skills, but at low effort. People who have, e.g., a weak knee, I simply tell them to use only the other position that doesn't strain the knee. The workshop is more about "how to do" something rather than a physically challenging regimen that puts people through the paces. ;)

Best.

Mike

Mike,

Thanks. That's good news. I hear all this talk of 'groundpath' and I was concerned that I would have difficulty sensing the connection to the ground if my injury interfered with my perception.

See you soon,
Stephen

Mike Sigman
02-26-2009, 11:48 AM
I hear all this talk of 'groundpath' and I was concerned that I would have difficulty sensing the connection to the ground if my injury interfered with my perception.

Nah.... you only need one leg. ;)

http://www.neijia.com/OneLegPushOriginal.jpg

HL1978
03-16-2009, 02:42 PM
I don't intend this to be a real review of Mike's seminar, but just some extremely general concepts.

I got a ton out of this workshop, from some understanding of how to move the arms without using muscle, a better understanding of how to get under someone without physically dropping the body, how to use intent to move a partner, what it means to physically connect to someones center and manipulate it and the role of breath in moving the body.

I like the logical steps Mike used to build upon each preceding exercise. He gave plenty of hands on time with everyone for just about every exercise so each participant could understand what they were supposed to be experiencing along with providing feedback as to whether or not they were getting it.

Mike's seminar is mentally taxing. While many in martial arts say that thinking too much is bad, you have to think a lot in terms of analyzing what your own body is doing, which parts of the body you are utilizing, and where the incoming forces are going within your body.

gregstec
03-16-2009, 03:24 PM
I like the logical steps Mike used to build upon each preceding exercise. He gave plenty of hands on time with everyone for just about every exercise so each participant could understand what they were supposed to be experiencing along with providing feedback as to whether or not they were getting it.

I agree. Mike presents a very logical and western approach to understanding and establishing a foundation that you can build upon for your internal skills - it it very contrary to the more esoteric approach you generally see coming from the eastern viewpoint, etc.

Tom H.
03-16-2009, 10:04 PM
While many in martial arts say that thinking too much is bad, you have to think a lot in terms of analyzing what your own body is doing, which parts of the body you are utilizing, and where the incoming forces are going within your body.

This is a great point Hunter. Connecting the mind to the body and operating them as a unit so that intent properly manifests power in the body is taxing. Both nights I went to bed exhausted, and looking back, I wasn't working nearly as hard as I should or could have been.

I also really liked the breath work and "noodling" Mike introduced to--as I understood it--identify, condition, and train the whole-body connective suit.

Tom H.
03-16-2009, 10:32 PM
Thanks to Dana and Heather for organizing and hosting. The location was great--large space, plenty of mirrors, convenient location--I really appreciated having water and bananas available, and everyone was very friendly.

gregstec
03-25-2009, 01:14 PM
Hello,

I sent a private email to Mike on 3/16/09 requesting info on how to join his QiJin forum as offered in one of Dana's emails to the seminar attendees, but have not received any response back as of yet. Has anyone else had a problem getting emails to Mike recently?

Thanks

Greg

Mike Sigman
03-25-2009, 01:56 PM
Hello,

I sent a private email to Mike on 3/16/09 requesting info on how to join his QiJin forum as offered in one of Dana's emails to the seminar attendees, but have not received any response back as of yet. Has anyone else had a problem getting emails to Mike recently?
Hi Greg:

I just got back into town 2 days ago and I'm behind in my emails. I'll send the subscribe stuff shortly.

Best.

Mike Sigman