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Sam Barnes
01-02-2009, 08:11 AM
Could somebody please tell me about the different styles of aikido, as I am not sure what class to look for ?

Many thanks

Sam

Voitokas
01-02-2009, 08:44 AM
Welcome! I think that, especially just starting out, the most important thing is to find a dojo where you feel comfortable. It's definitely worth the time to attend classes at any nearby dojos - teaching styles, class composition, and good mix of levels are all probably more important than style. From my point of view, anyway. Have fun!

James Edwards
01-03-2009, 04:34 AM
It might be easier if you tell us the types of dojos available for you. Every teacher also have their own styles even if they are within the same organisation. It's a good idea to watch a class at each dojo before joining as well.

The main branch of aikido is the aikikai organisation. As everyone points out, it's not a style but sort of an umbrella. But they tend to follow the teachings of the Ueshiba family (e.g. Doshu). So they focus on the basics and universal movements in aikido.

In the UK (I'm assuming that's where you are), Chiba sensei (who was O-sensei's uchi deshi) also established his Birankai organisation. It is still under aikikai and recognised under the aikikai hombu dojo but with slightly different syllabus, more emphasis on weapons work and a more martial approach. It reflects on Chiba sensei's aikido.

There's a list of Birankai dojos here:
http://www.britishbirankai.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=17&Itemid=32

There are also other clubs in the UK with affiliations to Iwama style of aikido. This reflects on the teachings of Saito sensei who was also a very close student of O-sensei. This style also emphasises on weapons work and from my understanding also utilise kiai in their practice.

Another style of aikido is the Yoshinkan style established by Gozo Shioda. It reflects on O-sensei's early teachings. So it looks more direct and linear. The harder style of aikido and what the Tokyo riot police elites train in.

And of course there is the ki aikido created by Koichi Tohei. It is seen to be one of the softer styles and they focus on the advancement of ki development as well as aikido.

quick search on wiki gave me this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aikido_styles

Good luck on your search!

Tony Wagstaffe
01-03-2009, 05:31 AM
Could somebody please tell me about the different styles of aikido, as I am not sure what class to look for ?

Many thanks

Sam

What are you looking for?

Tony Wagstaffe
01-03-2009, 10:06 AM
It might be easier if you tell us the types of dojos available for you. Every teacher also have their own styles even if they are within the same organisation. It's a good idea to watch a class at each dojo before joining as well.

The main branch of aikido is the aikikai organisation. As everyone points out, it's not a style but sort of an umbrella. But they tend to follow the teachings of the Ueshiba family (e.g. Doshu). So they focus on the basics and universal movements in aikido.

In the UK (I'm assuming that's where you are), Chiba sensei (who was O-sensei's uchi deshi) also established his Birankai organisation. It is still under aikikai and recognised under the aikikai hombu dojo but with slightly different syllabus, more emphasis on weapons work and a more martial approach. It reflects on Chiba sensei's aikido.

There's a list of Birankai dojos here:
http://www.britishbirankai.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=17&Itemid=32

There are also other clubs in the UK with affiliations to Iwama style of aikido. This reflects on the teachings of Saito sensei who was also a very close student of O-sensei. This style also emphasises on weapons work and from my understanding also utilise kiai in their practice.

Another style of aikido is the Yoshinkan style established by Gozo Shioda. It reflects on O-sensei's early teachings. So it looks more direct and linear. The harder style of aikido and what the Tokyo riot police elites train in.

And of course there is the ki aikido created by Koichi Tohei. It is seen to be one of the softer styles and they focus on the advancement of ki development as well as aikido.

quick search on wiki gave me this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aikido_styles

Good luck on your search!

Oh! And don't forget Tomiki Shodokan aikido ......:) ;) :cool: :D

titter!!

DCP
01-04-2009, 12:41 AM
FWIW- Just got back from a week-long seminar, and the shihan emphasized that he has no "style" of aikido and eluded that his students' aikido does not necessarily have to look like his-- as long as it's martially effective.

James Edwards
01-04-2009, 05:00 AM
Oh! And don't forget Tomiki Shodokan aikido ......:) ;) :cool: :D

titter!!

Oh noo :eek:
Sorry, didn't do that on purpose..

On addition to DCP's comment, I think everyone's aikido becomes different to suit themselves later on depending on their experience, teachers and the state of their body anyway.

Ron Tisdale
01-05-2009, 08:24 AM
http://www.e-budo.com/forum/showthread.php?t=17385&page=1

Best,
Ron

kernsales1
01-07-2009, 12:09 PM
Could somebody please tell me about the different styles of aikido, as I am not sure what class to look for ?

Many thanks

Sam
If you've had any type of fight in the street, you'd know the best Aikido classes use pressure point attacks, and the non street fighting Aikido uses a more gentle way of fighting. The gentle way will take years before you gain confidence. The pressure point way is more effective. I was in a class where you never learned anything new because a new person would sign up almost every day, and since we all trained together, we all had to go back to the beginning. Years earlier, I was in a class where I was learning 3 new techniques a day. So, you need to know what you really want in a fighting art. Is it grace or the ability to really fight and win.

kernsales1
01-07-2009, 12:17 PM
Welcome! I think that, especially just starting out, the most important thing is to find a dojo where you feel comfortable. It's definitely worth the time to attend classes at any nearby dojos - teaching styles, class composition, and good mix of levels are all probably more important than style. From my point of view, anyway. Have fun!

You are not giving a direction. You are advertising the ingredients in a cake mix, without helping them pick a cake. It's like someone asking for a bandaid, and you saying well there are different types of bandaids that you could use depending on the injury. You need to pick one bandaid and hand it to them. People need direction. For instance, I could bore you with all my experiences, or I could show you that one technique that will help you with that particular problem. So, do I generalize or customize?

Charles Hill
01-07-2009, 12:46 PM
Hi Don,

Jeremy has given the best, clearest direction on this thread for Sam.

1.find a dojo where you feel comfortable

2.try out a variety of dojo before making a decision

Criteria to use to evaluate dojo: teaching style, class composition, and a mix of levels.

Fits my experience too!

Charles