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Mark Uttech
10-11-2008, 05:43 AM
Onegaishimasu. As an avid chess player, I would be most interested in how some of you chess players out there relate aikido to chess. Does one play aggressively or evasively? (I am aware that the word 'avid' is defined as both: "eager" and "greedy". Well, "eager" is the better description as relates to this post).

In gassho,

Mark

Buck
10-11-2008, 08:40 AM
I am a horrible chess player, I am not that versed to discuss strategy, but I know enough to find the idea of Aikido having a middle game is very intriguing to me. Maybe that is where the power is. It could be where you make or break the technique, where the greatest area of error lays. Perhaps instead of bringing another principle or element outside of Aikido to improve Aikido skills, it just maybe a matter of focusing on your middle game to improve? It is intriguing to me to think Aikido can be thought of differently in terms of a middle game. I know lots of people think Go relates better. Because i don't know how to play Go, I can't relate to it. :)

gregg block
10-11-2008, 08:43 AM
In both chess and combat one must be able to predict their opponents move before it happens

Abasan
10-11-2008, 09:00 AM
Leading the 'opponent' is probably most relevant for me.

Erick Mead
10-11-2008, 09:36 AM
Onegaishimasu. As an avid chess player, I would be most interested in how some of you chess players out there relate aikido to chess. Does one play aggressively or evasively? (I am aware that the word 'avid' is defined as both: "eager" and "greedy". Well, "eager" is the better description as relates to this post).It depends on your view of chess. As I view chess, (or Go for that matter) the concept of kuzushi is very much sympathetic to certain recurrent strategies -- particularly zugswang.

Kevin Leavitt
10-11-2008, 09:36 AM
Ask this guy...he might know a "little" about chess and the martial way. good book btw if you have not read it. It is on my recommended reading list for all Martial Artist. Thanks to my good friend Irv Lachow for introducing me to it.

http://www.joshwaitzkin.com/

Mark Uttech
10-11-2008, 09:48 AM
Onegaishimasu. And thank you, Kevin, for introducing me to it. I will look around for the book today.

In gassho,

Mark

Shany
10-11-2008, 10:10 AM
Go isn't easy! damn with that game :D :D

Mark Uttech
10-11-2008, 10:24 AM
Go isn't easy! damn with that game :D :D

Onegaishimasu. I never learned how to play Go and merely dreamed of learning how. But here, in the West, Chess seems to be the rule. "The Go Masters" is a good film; do check it out.

In gassho,

mark

Buck
10-11-2008, 12:05 PM
Sometime ago I seen a movie called "Searching for Bobby Fisher" and while it was on TV it had trivia popping up and it said that Joshua Waitzkin which the movie is based on his life as a boy chess prodigy that latter on he became ( if you went to the link Kevin posted) a four time push-hands champion in China/Taiwan, beating the Chinese. I can't help to think that the way Joshua thinks and trained in chess had something to do with his Tai Chi push hands prowness. I wonder what he would be like as an Aikidoka?

I guess push hands is an exercise training game that is competitive (obviously) and not intended for fighting, but as a development tool. Push hands must be full of strategy plus the competition part for Waitkin to go from chess to push hands. Aikido not having a marked competition may have been overlooked by him when he was first interested in martial arts.

A real interesting movie.

Kevin Leavitt
10-11-2008, 07:43 PM
Push hands has the same amount of "competitiveness" as irimi nage or kokyu nage, for example when it is done properly with aliveness.

mickeygelum
10-11-2008, 09:46 PM
Control the center, control the game...

Aikibu
10-12-2008, 11:36 AM
Both are fun!!!

William Hazen

Andrew S
10-12-2008, 01:15 PM
A well-placed nikyo will improve your chances of winning at chess. Or just do iriminage on your opponent's queen. :D

gyudien
10-13-2008, 01:13 PM
Sometime ago I seen a movie called "Searching for Bobby Fisher" and while it was on TV it had trivia popping up and it said that Joshua Waitzkin which the movie is based on his life as a boy chess prodigy that latter on he became ( if you went to the link Kevin posted) a four time push-hands champion in China/Taiwan, beating the Chinese. I can't help to think that the way Joshua thinks and trained in chess had something to do with his Tai Chi push hands prowness. I wonder what he would be like as an Aikidoka?

You might want to take a look at Josh Waitzkin's book, "The Art of Learning." Waitzkin discusses his book in the following Youtube clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lj1gxz5puaQ

Kim S.
10-13-2008, 01:55 PM
I just started playing chess again.

When I took chess lessons, my chess tutor trained me to focus on end game strategies and control of the board. How this relates to Aikido, I am still figuring that out.

Besides, to have good chess ukemi, one must die a lot in when first learning and playing chess.

Just my two cents.

Mark Uttech
10-13-2008, 05:49 PM
I just started playing chess again

to have good chess ukemi, one must die a lot in when first learning and playing chess.

Just my two cents.

Onegaishimasu. Wonderfully put! I am fond of the fact that everyone I have taught how to play chess has beat me. And that now whenever we play again, the winner is never known in advance. Very much like aikido? O Sensei taught the kihon waza first and then he taught the kaishi-waza before he sent his senior students out to be world -class instructors.

In gassho,

Mark

Shane Marcum
10-13-2008, 06:05 PM
Mark,

I've been playing Chess since I was about twelve. After playing for several years, I learned that the best defense is an aggressive offense. Controlling the center ofthe board is of the utmost importance and can be likened to controlling your center in Aikido. The "Chess Match" comes in with reversals. Have you ever attempted to execute kotegaeshi, Ikkyo, or sankyo on a 3rd Dan or above? They know it's coming before you know you're going there.....just ike in Chess. A good Chess player looks and thinks sveral moves ahead. The same applies in Aikido, Uke can very quickly change into Nage if he is prepared and looking ahead. Ukemi should also be practiced accordingly. When taking Ukemi, always be aware of how you could counter the technique being applied if necessary. In the long run it will make you a better aikidoka.