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Stefan Stenudd
08-25-2008, 06:50 PM
I have just published a new book about aikido. This time the theme is kogeki, the attack techniques. As far as I know, it's the first book on this specific subject. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
Here it is on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1439207453/

And here is more information about it on my website:

http://www.stenudd.com/aikido/attacks-in-aikido-book.htm

It is based on the webpages on the same site about attack forms, but I've edited substantially and added some chapters - e.g. about attacks with weapons.

If you happen to have a look at the book, please let me know what you think about it. You don't have to be kind :)

Hebrew Hammer
08-27-2008, 10:49 PM
Stefan,
I'd be very interested purchasing your book. Do you know if its going to hit the bookshelves here the USA (Borders or Barnes and Noble)? Or strictly via Amazon?

Thanks,
Kevin

Stefan Stenudd
08-28-2008, 04:21 AM
Do you know if its going to hit the bookshelves here the USA (Borders or Barnes and Noble)? Or strictly via Amazon?
I really don't know, but my guess is that a book on this particular subject will not find its way to every bookstore.
It might be possible to order the book in a regular bookstore, but that will probably cost more than getting it from Amazon.

Shany
08-28-2008, 08:46 AM
I'm going to order it as soon as I can, looks very interesting. Thanks.

RoyK
08-28-2008, 10:17 AM
Stefan, first of all congratulations on getting the book published.

Second, I would like to inquire as to whether the attacks presented in the book are strictly from your Aikido education, and if so, who developed them?

Essentially I'm looking to understand if learning the presented attacks could be an equivalent of learning attacks in a strike-based martial art (karate etc), or if they are geared towards making me a better uke.

Stefan Stenudd
08-28-2008, 10:46 AM
I would like to inquire as to whether the attacks presented in the book are strictly from your Aikido education, and if so, who developed them?
Essentially I'm looking to understand if learning the presented attacks could be an equivalent of learning attacks in a strike-based martial art (karate etc), or if they are geared towards making me a better uke.
I love your questions, so I hope I do them justice in my answers.

What I present in the book are my thoughts and advice on attacks, as far as I understand - and that's primarily from aikido practice, but also from other martial arts in general, especially other budo.

From my beginning and on, I have belonged to dojos that are not just aikido dojos, but contain several other martial arts as well. That is true today, too, in my present dojo Enighet. Thanks to that, I've had some very fruitful exchange of perspectives and experiences, which are included in my treatment of the subject in the book.

Also, I've had aikido teachers who stressed - and with profound knowledge - the importance of learning proper attacks. So did my first Japanese teacher Ichimura sensei, as well as his teacher Nishio sensei, to name the two most influencial ones on my aikido path. Tamura sensei, too, has given me food for thought on the subject, to say the least.

Generally speaking, I try in the book to present the attack forms as they would make sense to the martial arts focusing on them. So, for strikes and kicks, I consider karatedo, for sword attacks I look at iaido, kendo, and kenjutsu, and so on.
I am a strong believer in studying the attacking martial arts in order to learn how to attack, as well as how to defend against such attacks.
That's also the way to becoming the best possible uke. The more advanced the attacks are, the more advanced the aikido responses can become.

There is still an aikido perspective - for example in my choice of mainly Japanese martial arts parallells. Nonetheless, when needed, I have pointed out what I believe to be relevant outside of budo, and in some cases what might be better to consider than the budo solutions.
Actually, I have also partly considered out-of-dojo experiences, but let's not get into that ;)

Aikibu
08-28-2008, 11:36 AM
I just read the excerpt you had posted on your web site.

Congrats Stefan. I can't wait to buy the book. Thanks (so far :) ) for making sense of a sometimes confusing and difficult concept in Aikido. How does one "attack"

With out good Ukemi there is no way to really progress in Aikido. :)

William Hazen

justin
08-29-2008, 09:38 AM
got my mind ticking over, will let you know how I get on with it.

5 days from amazon

Dan Herak
08-29-2008, 09:41 AM
This book is a really good idea. Improving in aikido requires being on the receiving end of good, solid attacks. Practitioners tend to focus so heavily on being nage, and improving their technique, that they really skimp on what it means to be a good uke.

I find it telling that many times in class, after practice is momentarily stopped when the instructor is demonstrating some nuance of a technique, that someone will ask, after practice has resumed, "who's turn is it?" As if nage is the only one with a 'turn.' Responding along the lines of "It's my turn to be uke and your turn to be nage" is a good way to remember that being uke, and attacking nage, is an integral part of the relationship.

Stefan Stenudd
08-29-2008, 12:37 PM
Improving in aikido requires being on the receiving end of good, solid attacks. Practitioners tend to focus so heavily on being nage, and improving their technique, that they really skimp on what it means to be a good uke.
Indeed, that was my incentive for writing the book.

"Whose turn" - that's a very good example of misconceptions in aikido practice. Uke meaning approximately "receiving" implies that the one who is to learn the major lesson in the aikido technique is uke, and not tori.
Of course, in the best of worlds both learn just as much :)