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David Yap
07-04-2008, 03:45 AM
Hi all,

I was introduced to the school of Shinpo Wado and I was told that the founder of the school, Hayakawa Sooho, was one of the last students of O'Sensei. My take of the style is that it is aikido stressed on pressure points. I tried researching into this style and Hayakawa Sooho sensei but nothing much has been written on the Net.

Anyone here has any clue?

Regards

David Y

oisin bourke
07-04-2008, 06:59 AM
Try a search for Ted Devlin based in Liverpool, England. I think he learned the style when stationed in Malaysia. I've only seen videos
of him. It looks pretty painful stuff (interesting nonetheless).

Dan Rubin
07-04-2008, 12:44 PM
Look here:

http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/6550/tdev.htm

David Yap
07-05-2008, 02:31 PM
Try a search for Ted Devlin based in Liverpool, England. I think he learned the style when stationed in Malaysia. I've only seen videos
of him. It looks pretty painful stuff (interesting nonetheless).

Thanks, Oisin,

I actually met Francis Ramasamy shihan was Ted Devlin's teacher in Malaysia last weekend. He shown me a couple of movements from Shinpo Wado and told that Hayakawa Sooho was a student of O'sensei. Francis shihan is a gem of gentleman and I learnt quite a lot just listening to him. My visit to his home was quite short - just a couple of hours.

I understand from another source that Hayakawa claimed Shinpo Wado to be a direct transmission from O'Sensei and this was a dispute on this claim. Just like to know more.

David Y

KamiKaze_Evolution
07-09-2008, 09:31 AM
According my acknowledgment, David Earys was really practice Yoshinkan Aikido under Francis Ramasamy. But sorry, i am not very sure that has Earys been learn Mushin Wado Shinpo or not.

alex angioli
08-04-2008, 05:37 PM
Hi all,

I was introduced to the school of Shinpo Wado and I was told that the founder of the school, Hayakawa Sooho, was one of the last students of O'Sensei. My take of the style is that it is aikido stressed on pressure points. I tried researching into this style and Hayakawa Sooho sensei but nothing much has been written on the Net.

Anyone here has any clue?

Regards

David Y
Hello David,
I studied with Master Hayakawa back in 1975-76, in Kanazawa, Japan. At that time it was called Shintoden Shotokaku Wado, although the appellation Shinpo Wado had already been introduced.
Master Hayakawa spoke often of Osensei Ueshiba and had the highest regard for him. It was at that time that Shinpo Wado began to assume more unique features, including influence of Chinese arts, especially forms of Pa-Kua which Master Hayakawa had learned in Malaysia. Before that, it resembled Hombu Aikido, though perhaps a little harder.
Master Hayakawa told me personally that he had been offered the 10th Dan and a position at Hombu Aikido, but preferred "the homeless way." The influence of Zen Buddhism in his teaching became more pronounced over the years and when I met him it was the core philosophy of Wado Shinpo.
Master Hayakawa was a great martial artist and a keen and deep thinker. His life mission was not found a new school, but to bring about wisdom and enlightenment in those whom he met. There is much more to say about both Wado Shinpo and Master Hayakawa. If anyone is interested, I will post more. Also, I have a DVD of Master Hayakawa and senior students which I may post to YouTube.

raul rodrigo
08-04-2008, 10:25 PM
Master Hayakawa told me personally that he had been offered the 10th Dan and a position at Hombu Aikido, but preferred "the homeless way."

Does that mean Hayakawa is 9th dan Aikikai?

R

David Yap
08-05-2008, 01:53 AM
Hello David,
I studied with Master Hayakawa back in 1975-76, in Kanazawa, Japan. At that time it was called Shintoden Shotokaku Wado, although the appellation Shinpo Wado had already been introduced.
Master Hayakawa spoke often of Osensei Ueshiba and had the highest regard for him. It was at that time that Shinpo Wado began to assume more unique features, including influence of Chinese arts, especially forms of Pa-Kua which Master Hayakawa had learned in Malaysia. Before that, it resembled Hombu Aikido, though perhaps a little harder.
Master Hayakawa told me personally that he had been offered the 10th Dan and a position at Hombu Aikido, but preferred "the homeless way." The influence of Zen Buddhism in his teaching became more pronounced over the years and when I met him it was the core philosophy of Wado Shinpo.
Master Hayakawa was a great martial artist and a keen and deep thinker. His life mission was not found a new school, but to bring about wisdom and enlightenment in those whom he met. There is much more to say about both Wado Shinpo and Master Hayakawa. If anyone is interested, I will post more. Also, I have a DVD of Master Hayakawa and senior students which I may post to YouTube.

Thank you, Alex, for the information.

I was not told that Hayakawa had learnt Pakua while in Malaysia. I was told that he was one of the last students to have studied closely from O' Sensei. It was hinted that the Pakua influence was already inherent in O' Sensei's teachings.

Yes. I am interested to read your postings. Thank you in anticipation.

Regards

David Y

alex angioli
08-05-2008, 10:32 AM
Does that mean Hayakawa is 9th dan Aikikai?

RHello Raul,
Master Hayakawa passed away in 1999. I do not know if he possessed the Hombu 9th Dan before splitting off. The awarding of ranks in earlier times was often a less linear and rigorous thing than it is now. There are many instances of Osensei and others simply declaring that a student was at a certain level. I am implying this was the case for Master Hayakawa in Aikido, just putting in context.

alex angioli
08-05-2008, 11:34 AM
Thank you, Alex, for the information.

I was not told that Hayakawa had learnt Pakua while in Malaysia. I was told that he was one of the last students to have studied closely from O' Sensei. It was hinted that the Pakua influence was already inherent in O' Sensei's teachings.

Yes. I am interested to read your postings. Thank you in anticipation.

Regards

David Y
Hello David,
Probably the Pakua influence was there in Osensei's teaching since he spent considerable time in China and probably acquired martial arts knowledge during his sojourn. Master Hayakawa's exposure to Pakua and other Chinese arts without a doubt originated independently and most likely during his stay in Penang and other parts of Malaysia, a country which he loved.
Master Hayakawa also taught Karate (do not know which style) in Malaysia and was one of the first TV Karate personalities in Penang. Master Hayakawa was accomplished in many martial arts, including kodachi and his teaching was eclectic and multidimensional. It was less about technique ("there are many techniques") than about life, and about developing heart, mind and soul. He was in the business of opening minds. I must add that for him it was never a "business" and that he always refused payment from his students, sometimes forcing people to go to great lengths to help pay for expenses.