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shadowedge
06-24-2008, 01:49 AM
Hi everyone,

I'm moving to Japan by the 3rd or 4th week of July. I'm a bit nervous about the whole experience as I will be going there for work.

Although I was hoping if any of our Japanese and/or non-Japanese friends can shed some light on a few things that are bothering me.

Question #1 - is it normal in Japanese corporations to give contracts to employees? I am receiving one because I asked for it, but my employers told me that they don't normally do contracts there. (I don't really know if they meant "there in the company only" or "there - in Japan as a whole"

Question #2 - do all trains have digital status screens showing their, locations / destinations etc. ?? The last time I was there, there was someone to pick me up, and we took the Narita Express which had a screen showing where we are, and what was the next stop. I understand that the N'Ex is a rather pricey ride, hence the more modern and class service. I was wondering if other cheaper lines have something similar. I'm just worried about getting off at the wrong stop and so on :o

Anyway, thanks, hope you guys can help me out.

Doumo arigatou gosaimasu!

J

Josh Reyer
06-24-2008, 02:57 AM
Question #1 - is it normal in Japanese corporations to give contracts to employees? I am receiving one because I asked for it, but my employers told me that they don't normally do contracts there. (I don't really know if they meant "there in the company only" or "there - in Japan as a whole"

That sounds very weird. Working visas in Japan require a fair bit of paperwork, including work contracts detailing pay, hours, and kind of work being done. I have never worked for any job in Japan that did not include some kind of contract/work agreement. What are you doing and where are you working?

Question #2 - do all trains have digital status screens showing their, locations / destinations etc. ?? The last time I was there, there was someone to pick me up, and we took the Narita Express which had a screen showing where we are, and what was the next stop. I understand that the N'Ex is a rather pricey ride, hence the more modern and class service. I was wondering if other cheaper lines have something similar. I'm just worried about getting off at the wrong stop and so on :o

No, it greatly depends on the train and the train company. New spiffy lines with new spiffy trains will have automated announcements in both Japanese and English, as well as screens showing the route, next stop, etc. Less spiffy trains will have an English display, but no automated English announcement. Old trains will have no announcement, and no display, although a map of the trains route and stops (in English) will be posted somewhere in the car. Worse comes to worst, look out the window everytime the train stops. All the station signs are bilingual, and you'll have to go waaaay out into the boonies to find one that isn't.

Expect to get on the wrong train/get off at the wrong stop a few times. That's part of the experience! :D

shadowedge
06-24-2008, 03:29 AM
I have never worked for any job in Japan that did not include some kind of contract/work agreement. What are you doing and where are you working?

Yeah, I'm ill be working in an animation company as a 3D artist. The visa paperwork are all in order, employers just told me that it isn't normal for them there to have a work contract between them and an employee. (I guess they were referring to their company then). :o

Expect to get on the wrong train/get off at the wrong stop a few times. That's part of the experience!

Yikes! :dead:

Josh Reyer
06-24-2008, 08:04 AM
Yikes! :dead:

The worst that can happen is that you'll have to go back the way you came...

mwpowell
06-24-2008, 09:55 AM
Don't let getting lost worry you. It's half the fun!

Here's my #1 travel tip...whenever you get lost, look for the nearest pretty girl and ask for directions. Sometimes she can help, sometimes she can't, but you'll always enjoy the experience!

[And just in case you're female (name is Rene, so I'm not 100% sure...), I presume this works in reverse, as well.] :p

shadowedge
06-25-2008, 10:03 PM
[And just in case you're female (name is Rene, so I'm not 100% sure...), I presume this works in reverse, as well.]

:D I'm 100% man...

...50% chicken regarding this thread's topic...but about 90% feeling better thanks to you guys. hahahaha

Rennis Buchner
06-28-2008, 08:17 AM
Question #1 - is it normal in Japanese corporations to give contracts to employees? I am receiving one because I asked for it, but my employers told me that they don't normally do contracts there. (I don't really know if they meant "there in the company only" or "there - in Japan as a whole"



Has the company hired foreigners from overseas before? For pretty much all work related visas, if your are getting your visa through your company they must have a contract and supply it to immigration in order to get get visa approved. Getting a working visa approved with no contract is close to impossible for most people, especially if it's their first time through.

For what it's worth,
Rennis Buchner

shadowedge
07-17-2008, 02:46 AM
Has the company hired foreigners from overseas before? For pretty much all work related visas, if your are getting your visa through your company they must have a contract and supply it to immigration in order to get get visa approved. Getting a working visa approved with no contract is close to impossible for most people, especially if it's their first time through.Yeah they got me one.. hehe it just came really really late. So i got worried. I sometimes have this bad tendency to assume the worst in a situation. :o

Anyway, I already have a flight schedule and its at the end of this month :) Thing is I can barely speak and read Nihongo. (Most especially, Kanji ~ can't read a single character).

Now, I'll be making my way to Kokubunji alone. I've already checked out the train schedules and I know what I route i want to take. Thing is I since I can't read the ticket that well. I'm afraid i might get the platform number mixed up with the car number or something.

I was there for a few days last May, and now I'm really regretting that i didn't take a picture of the train ticket or took notes of the layout.

So can anyone help me out?
I just need to know where these things are positioned on the ticket:

Train name
Car Number
Platform number
seat number (maybe)

Edit:

http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h273/ninjei/traintickets.jpg

Here's a sample ~ which is which? >__<

Thanks again.

J

Peter Goldsbury
07-17-2008, 03:33 AM
The left hand ticket is an ordinary ticket (jousha-ken) it allows you to board the shinkansen train) between Narita Airport Terminal Two and Kyoto).

The right-hand ticket is the special reserved seat ticket (shinkansen tokyuu-ken) required for traveling on the shinkansen. Your ticket is valid for September 4, for the Hikari 103, leaving Tokyo at 12.37, Car No 6, Row 15, Seat D (aisle seat). The train arrives in Kyoto at 15.22. The cars are numbered from the end facing Kyoto.

shadowedge
07-17-2008, 03:48 AM
Hi Sir Peter,

Thanks for the very useful info!

now I know what the characters for Car number, seat number and row are. Plus the name of the (train?/Line?). This is really very very helpful.

By the way, you're in Hiroshima right? How long is the train ride there if Im coming from, say..shinjuku? :)

Thanks again.

Peter Goldsbury
07-17-2008, 04:59 AM
Hi Sir Peter,

Thanks for the very useful info!

now I know what the characters for Car number, seat number and row are. Plus the name of the (train?/Line?). This is really very very helpful.

By the way, you're in Hiroshima right? How long is the train ride there if Im coming from, say..shinjuku? :)

Thanks again.

Hello Rene,

From Shinjuku, you need to take the JR Chuo Line (Rapid Service--the trains are tomato coloured) to Tokyo and then change to the Tokaido Shinkansen. The fastest Nozomi trains reach Hiroshima in about 4 hours.

If you access the JNTO website (http://www.jnto.go.jp), you will find much useful information in a number of languages.

shadowedge
07-20-2008, 09:56 AM
Alright,

I have a new question. :)

I'm planning to bring along a toaster, an electric stove and maybe a rice cooker. Where I'm from, the standard voltage for appliances is 220V. I heard rumors that in Japan it's 110V only... is this true? :confused:

Sincerely boggled,

J

CitoMaramba
07-20-2008, 11:42 AM
Actually it's 100V. Some outlets may have a step up to 200V.
Check here:
http://www.gbaudio.co.uk/data/mains.htm