PDA

View Full Version : The Intuitive Mind


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


Sam Turnage
06-10-2008, 09:25 PM
I have decided to supplement my Aikido training with some reading. Today I picked up, Enlightenment through Aikido. I have know idea if the book is any good but I just couldn’t pass up the opportunity, to maybe learn something from the likes of Sunadomari and O Sensei himself; so I will start with that.

I am looking to learn more about the spiritual teachings or side of Aikido in order to be better and more complete in my Aikido, to truly understand it. I am hoping to lean more about how to feel more, develop Ki or Aiki power (not magic Ki balls, you know what I mean), I would also like to learn more about breathing and meditation etc.

I saw a book at the store that was called I think “The intuitive mind” and I recognized some names from this forum that helped in the making of the book. But I could not find a thread on it. Can anyone tell me about the book? What would or should I learn from it?

Regards
Sam

crbateman
06-10-2008, 11:28 PM
I don't recognize the book. Could you possibly be thinking of "The Intuitive Body" by Wendy Palmer?

Sam Turnage
06-11-2008, 12:11 AM
I don't recognize the book. Could you possibly be thinking of "The Intuitive Body" by Wendy Palmer?

My bad:sorry: , that was it.:)

crbateman
06-11-2008, 01:39 AM
My bad:sorry: , that was it.:)Figured it might be... It's a good book, although I don't know if it is really a primer on the spiritual dimensions of Aikido. It does show some ways to take aiki constructs "off the mat" for use in everyday life enrichment. Here (http://www.aikidojournal.com/bibliography_details?id=92) is a link to a little better description.

Mark Jakabcsin
06-11-2008, 07:51 AM
I found "The Way of Aikido: Life Lessons From an American Sensei" by George Leonard to be a good read. It has been many years since I read this book so I cannot comment if it will meet exactly what you are looking for but I do remember enjoying the book and finding useful information inside. Good luck on your quest.

Take care,

Mark J.

Mark Uttech
06-11-2008, 05:37 PM
Mitsugi Saotome Shihan's first book, "Aikido and the Harmony of Nature" is a very good read, for beginner and advanced alike.

In gassho,

Mark

Takahama
06-12-2008, 02:29 AM
Mitsugi Saotome Shihan's first book, "Aikido and the Harmony of Nature" is a very good read, for beginner and advanced alike.

In gassho,

Mark

I wholeheartedly agree. I've picked up a few texts in my years of keiko, but this one I keep going back to the most.

Sam Turnage
06-13-2008, 10:02 AM
Thanks for your help with the must read books.

I have read Enlightenment through Aikido and Zen in the Martial arts so far and I has generated a list of books to get that the store do not have.

Aikido and Harmony of Nature
The Essense of Aikido
Principles of Aikido
The spirit of Aikido
The Art of Peace
And I am still looking for a good book on Ki or developing Ki

lbb
06-13-2008, 12:54 PM
Thanks for your help with the must read books.

I have read Enlightenment through Aikido and Zen in the Martial arts so far and I has generated a list of books to get that the store do not have.

I really, really disliked "Zen in the Martial Arts". I thought Hyams was a tiresome name-dropper who did a poor job of regurgitating old martial arts chestnuts. The book contained neither new insights, nor old truths told in a clear, fresh and original manner.

crbateman
06-13-2008, 04:00 PM
The book contained neither new insights, nor old truths told in a clear, fresh and original manner.This is unfortunately a characteristic common to many of the newer Aikido books. There just is not a whole lot of new information, and writers and publishers alike are pushing for quantity of writing, rather than quality or originality. There are usually a few "nuggets" in each new book, but there is no radical material that would fill a book cover to cover. And the problem is compounded by the fact that many of those who do have something to say simply aren't writing (too much risk of time and resources in what is, at best, a niche market). Sad reality...

Takahama
06-14-2008, 04:36 AM
I really, really disliked "Zen in the Martial Arts". I thought Hyams was a tiresome name-dropper who did a poor job of regurgitating old martial arts chestnuts. The book contained neither new insights, nor old truths told in a clear, fresh and original manner.

A similar title but a very good read is 'The Zen Way to the Martial Arts' by Taisen Deshimaru. The chapter called Mind Body One is memorable, although there are other good sections. It has an introduction by George Leonard.

Mark Uttech
06-14-2008, 06:23 AM
I also recommend any book by Taisen Deshimaru. His zen strongly inspired me, in my life, and in my practice. His way is like a firm handshake; you're on your own, but the master is nearby. This is kind of practical, whereas the zen of Shunryu Suzuki, my other inspiration, is simply "warm hand to warm hand."

In gassho,

Mark

Cady Goldfield
06-14-2008, 08:41 PM
I really, really disliked "Zen in the Martial Arts". I thought Hyams was a tiresome name-dropper who did a poor job of regurgitating old martial arts chestnuts. The book contained neither new insights, nor old truths told in a clear, fresh and original manner.

It was lauded in its day (the '70s) as the Westerner's "Reader's Digest" version of Zen. ;)
Pretty lightweight, California "fern bar" philosophy a la Cyra McFadden, but that's no surprise considering Joe Hyams was a journalist-turned-Hollywood television screenwriter married to actress Elke Sommer. He name-dropped, but himself was a name to be dropped in that LA millieu. He dabbled in the martial arts as grist for magazine articles, and later his book, but never did more than scratch the surface. Not the book I'd turn to for real understanding of Eastern thought in respect to MAs and aikido.

Better to read Hiroaki Sato's "The Sword and the Mind" and maybe "The Book of Tea" if you want a more esoteric view of the proper application of mindset.

Mark Uttech
06-15-2008, 06:53 AM
"Zen in the Martial Arts" was a popularizing sort of book for beginners of eastern thought back in the day. At that time, there were only a few books on aikido available. Now, there is a greater variety of excellent books on aikido available so yes, the book by Hyams can be safely ignored.

In gassho,

Mark

Stefan Stenudd
06-15-2008, 10:35 AM
And I am still looking for a good book on Ki or developing Ki
Pardon me for mentioning my own book about ki, and how to awaken and stimulate it:
http://www.qi-energy.info/qibook.htm

Otherwise, Tohei sensei has written a number of books on the subject. The one I like the most is not exactly focused on ki, but a delightful read anyway: "Aikido in Daily Life," from the 1960's.
I am not sure if there is an edition in print now, but surely it can be found used, and in some libraries.

tedehara
06-15-2008, 11:30 AM
...Otherwise, Tohei sensei has written a number of books on the subject. The one I like the most is not exactly focused on ki, but a delightful read anyway: "Aikido in Daily Life," from the 1960's.
I am not sure if there is an edition in print now, but surely it can be found used, and in some libraries.Aikido in Daily Life has been revised under the title Ki in Daily Life ISBN 4889960716 and is currently in print.

I would recommend two out-of-print books both by William Reed, one of K. Tohei's American students. Ki: A Practical Guide for Westerners ISBN 087040640X and Ki: A Road Anyone Can Walk ISBN 0870407996. Both are available online as used books.