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B.J.M.
05-10-2008, 09:13 AM
So, I dislocated my ring finger on my right hand (had to be my right) last night during training. Got caught in the lapel of a gi.

It perfectly just "bent" the opposite direction; very cleanly I might add. I was able with little effort to simply push it back to normal.

As one can imagine, it is quite sore, yet it hasn't swelled at all.

I have a splint on it and have been icing, taking tylenol, etc.

What's next? With the description, how long before I can "really" train again?

Is two to three weeks realistic?

Anyone else go through this?

mickeygelum
05-10-2008, 09:33 AM
Today....If a physical confrontation within the next couple of hours would occur, would you defend yourself with, " Come back later, I hurt my finger "...:D

Adapt, execute and overcome...:ki:

Train well,

Mickey

ps...personally, I prefer Alleve for sprains, strains and pains

Shany
05-10-2008, 09:50 AM
Brent Magnusson,

I got hurt on one of my fingers at my left hand during a slide on a tatami after some technique, my finger though didn't! and I injured the base of my finger, 2, 3 weeks? it's still hurting after 3months i must say, but its way better now.
the body will heal during some time.

mabye in cold days it could hurt a bit, but eventually it will heal it self.

damn i'd wish to be like wolverine sometimes! :D

Janet Rosen
05-10-2008, 11:16 AM
Shany, your injury may/not have been a dislocation, so hard to exactly compare to the OP.

The general rule of thumb is that soft tissue takes 6 to 8 wks to heal. But with a dislocation it is possible that structures moved but no structures (ligaments, tendons, muscles) were actually torn. So it may be that allowing for a shorter period of generalized reduction in trauma/swelling (RICE being perfect for this) and then buddy splinting it for a while on return to training will be fine.

I would say that if a return to training results in pain, let that be your guide to back off immediately and wait a while, as the thing we all experience and hate to see happen to others, is an acute injury turn into a chronic injury.

Demetrio Cereijo
05-10-2008, 02:25 PM
Be careful with that. I was used to let fingers heal by themselves until the day i noticed my thumb has lost range of motion. 100 € spent in physiotherapy.

SeiserL
05-11-2008, 09:22 AM
IMHO, its always wise to get it checked out to make sure its just dislocated and not broken. Make sure its set in the right alignment. Tape and ice it. It will hurt.

Talk to your Sensei and training partners. I've trained with many dislocated or broken parts. You just have to train wisely. It can actually help you slow down and train mindfully.

Shany
05-11-2008, 12:27 PM
Shany, your injury may/not have been a dislocation, so hard to exactly compare to the OP.

yeah i know, though it hurts even 3 months after it happened...

DonMagee
05-12-2008, 12:56 PM
Coming from judo my advice. Keep it elevated and iced. Soak in a epson salt bath for a bit. Then tape it up to the nearest finger and get back to training.

Broken fingers and toes don't need to slow you down much.

dragonteeth
05-12-2008, 03:21 PM
IMHO, its always wise to get it checked out to make sure its just dislocated and not broken. Make sure its set in the right alignment. Tape and ice it. It will hurt.


I would second this, especially if you are in a profession where a high level of manual dexterity is required. A quick check now could save you PT and/or surgery later if it happens to be off by a little bit.

Nick P.
05-13-2008, 09:28 AM
It has taken me a long time (10 years) to learn this lesson; when injured, remember the mats will always be waiting for you to return.

1. Take at least 2~3 weeks off; run, bike, hike, swim...anything but contact.
2. See someone while you are on that break from training.
3. When you think you might be ready to go back, take another 10 days.

Thats how I got back after dislocating a rib a few months ago, and was the best injury management I have ever done.

Good luck.