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Gaiden324
03-20-2008, 02:43 PM
Good morning all. I just had a quick question. I used to do bujinkan and practiced that for about a year and a half and then unfortunately had to move away from my dojo. The only one in my new location was pretty bad both business wise and training wise and I got out of there as soon as I could. I'm looking for a new martial art to do that's a little more mainstream and easier to find places to train then bujinkan and I thought aikido or jujutsu would be good. Here's the things I'm looking for:
1. I have nerve damage in my right hand which makes it extremely hard to put more then 20 lbs of pressure into a grip, to put this in perspective I have a hard time holding some college text books with that hand.
2. I am training to be an Air Force officer and need something that if I yank it out can put somebody on the ground. This may be used in an aircraft or tight quarters so something where I have to get a run up isn't really an option.

Any help any of ya'll can give would be greatly appreciated and thanks for ya'll's time.

DarkShodan
03-20-2008, 03:14 PM
You're asking if you should do aikido or jujitsu...on an aikido blog? Let me think...hmmmm....I dunno...I say jujitsu...no wait...aikido! Having a little bit of experience with bujinkan and jujitsu (brazil and japanese) really I think Aikido would be better. I may be a bit bias here, but definitely aikido. We did a lot of off balance techniques in bujinkan that really helped in aikido. We also did some cool arm traps that were very much like aikido. If you're looking at Brazilian Jujitsu your lesser grip may be a problem. I just remember holding on tight to a lot of gis. I hope you at least find and rt yo like, with an instructor you like, that's also very important. Good luck!

DonMagee
03-20-2008, 03:36 PM
Don't let the lack of grip discourage you from jiujitsu (of the bjj variety) griping is actually something you can work around.

From wikipedia:
Jean Jacques Machado is one of five brothers of the Machado Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu family, the others being Carlos, Roger, Rigan and John. He has a disfigured left hand only having a thumb and a little finger. Despite this, he is known for his grappling skills. He has won ADCC Submission Wrestling World Championships in his weight division and came runner up in the open division in 2001.

This guy has a thumb and a finger on one hand and is a famous bjj player. He uses under and overhooks instead of grips to control with that arm.

edtang
03-20-2008, 05:34 PM
I'd like to point out that no-gi BJJ is much less dependent on grip strength than gi Jiu Jitsu.

I'd say try both out - both arts have their admitted strengths and weaknesses - and go from there.

Michael Hackett
03-20-2008, 05:40 PM
Training to be an Air Force officer.......interesting story about the various branches of service.

If you ask the Marines to secure a building, they will assault from the roof and kill or capture anyone inside.

If you ask the Army to secure a building, they will surround it with armored vehicles and reduce it to rubble with artillery fire.

If you ask the Navy to secure a building, they will turn out the lights and lock all the doors as they leave.

If you ask the Air Force to secure a building, they will let an RFP, take the most responsive bidder and lease it with options to renew.

Good luck with your training and thank you for serving.

MikeLogan
03-20-2008, 09:58 PM
Hey Pete, I am not sure about the San Antonio area, there are several texan posters on aikiweb. Hopefully they can pitch in to the discussion, if not, click this text to search the san antonio area. (http://www.aikiweb.com/search/)

As for your hand, I would offer up the example of a dojo-mate who lost 3 fingers on his right hand(old Marine). The nifty thing about aikido, is that the keener your proprioception becomes, of both yourself and of the various shapes of training partner you encounter, the less effort you begin to put forth to effect them.

At first pins and certain grips will likely be problematic, and it would most likely be advisable to show the 5 or 6 most commons wrist joint locks to a doctor familiar with the state of your right hand.

On the brighter side, Popeye fore-arms aren't a requirement, in fact too rigid a grip may actually prove to be the more brittle connection. A softer grip that leaves you more relaxed throughout the upper body will keep you in better contact with a training partner.

Anyhow, good luck!

michael.

===
some san antonio (10 mile radius) dojo websites:
http://www.aikipeace.com/aikido/ (hombu)
http://www.alamocityaikido.com (asu)
http://www.aikidosa.org (usaf)

different affiliations that train in the aikikai style, each with their own flavour. A wider radius search with the link I provided above might show other styles, such as yoshinkan or shodokan, tomiki.

Aristeia
03-20-2008, 10:24 PM
I think you'll find aikido has enough similarity to some of the bujinkan stuff that it will make for an easy transition. You should also be able to work around the grip problem.

mwible
03-21-2008, 02:29 PM
Good morning all. I just had a quick question. I used to do bujinkan and practiced that for about a year and a half and then unfortunately had to move away from my dojo. The only one in my new location was pretty bad both business wise and training wise and I got out of there as soon as I could. I'm looking for a new martial art to do that's a little more mainstream and easier to find places to train then bujinkan and I thought aikido or jujutsu would be good. Here's the things I'm looking for:
1. I have nerve damage in my right hand which makes it extremely hard to put more then 20 lbs of pressure into a grip, to put this in perspective I have a hard time holding some college text books with that hand.
2. I am training to be an Air Force officer and need something that if I yank it out can put somebody on the ground. This may be used in an aircraft or tight quarters so something where I have to get a run up isn't really an option.

Any help any of ya'll can give would be greatly appreciated and thanks for ya'll's time.

the grip problem is no biggy in aikido, since in almost none of the techniques are you really gripping hard (and even if so, then you can easily work around it)

and the "being able to quickly drop someone" thing, well, lets just say that you've come to the right martial art :cool:

oisin bourke
03-22-2008, 08:50 AM
2. I am training to be an Air Force officer and need something that if I yank it out can put somebody on the ground. This may be used in an aircraft or tight quarters so something where I have to get a run up isn't really an option.

In Seigo Okamoto's book on Daito Ryu Aiki jujutsu, he includes some testamonials from his students. One is currently based in Texas (according to the text) but was a long term student of his in Japan.

Anyway, this individual was a medical officer in the navy, and some of the reasons he practised Daito Ryu included that he found it highly effective in close quarters (such as submarines etc) and that it could be executed using minimal strength.

Anyway, a related search on the Roppokai may help. I don't recall this man's name at the moment and the book is a few years old and may be out of date.

Gaiden324
03-27-2008, 11:00 PM
Thanks for your help everybody. After this summer my schedule is going to free up and I defiantly want to start training again. Thanks again for everything.