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Tijani1150
03-09-2008, 11:14 PM
before my my knee dislocation injury during practise I was very enthusiastic about Aikido and now 4 months after that incident I feel I lost interest in going back to practise I am even contemplating quitting on the art which makes me wonder is this normal?

SeiserL
03-10-2008, 08:03 AM
IMHO, yes.
For me, Aikido is not a spectator sport.
To keep motivated/interested, I need to stay on the mat.

Cordula Meyer
03-10-2008, 11:37 AM
Of course it is normal to dislike or fear something, when you were injured while doing it. You could go an watch a few classes. So you can find out, if you still like aikido or not.

Jennifer Yabut
03-10-2008, 11:53 AM
It is perfectly normal to have doubts about training after a serious injury. How long were you training before the injury, and if you don't mind me asking, how did you dislocate your knee? Are you healed up enough to train on a regular basis? Perhaps you can work your way back on the mat...SLOWLY. As the previous poster suggested, watch a couple classes first to help determine if this is what you still want. Then maybe you could try taking on a beginner's class to see how well your knee can handle low-impact training. Ultimately, it is up to you. Just remember that *all* martial arts - and any kind of physical activity (even bowling) - have a potential for injury. ;)

Chris Lacey
03-10-2008, 11:57 AM
Another consideration...Have you been seeing a physical therapist that specializes in (or familiar with) martial arts injury recovery? That may be a good place to begin. She or he can advise you, how to strengthen and stabilize your knee so you can participate without fear of further injury to your knee.

Cephallus
03-10-2008, 12:41 PM
In my personal experience, the most important time to step up and give your best is right at the moment you feel like giving up. This is not just in martial arts, but in life.

I suffered a severe spiral break to my fibula playing hockey a few years ago, which required surgery (plate/screws/tendon-reattachment/etc) and *months* of rehab. And when the ankle was finally strong enough to support weight, I found that it was too swollen still to fit inside of my skate boot. The end result was that I ended up off of the ice for more than a year, and was facing the same feelings of self-doubt that you are now: do I really want to keep playing, and is it worth the chance of injury?

It wasn't until I played my first game again after the absence that I realized that hockey wasn't the issue...the issue was facing my doubts and overcoming my fear that I would re-injure the leg. I do continue to play hockey off and on (I'm currently taking a few months off), but it does not hold the same kind of passion it held for me before.

Was it the injury that changed my long-term view of hockey? No, it was having the time off from playing that gave me space to reflect on the priorities that I place on things in my life. When I started playing hockey again, it wasn't just to play hockey - it was to prove to myself that I *could* play again. And I found out that I still enjoyed it immensely, even if it didn't consume me the way it had before.

Unless you give yourself the chance to find out, you'll never know for sure.

Good luck!

lbb
03-10-2008, 03:16 PM
before my my knee dislocation injury during practise I was very enthusiastic about Aikido and now 4 months after that incident I feel I lost interest in going back to practise I am even contemplating quitting on the art which makes me wonder is this normal?

I'd say it's normal, but I don't think that's the question you really want answered...is it?

I don't quite hold with the "back on the horse" approach. Sometimes it takes getting thrown off the horse to get you to realize that you didn't really want to be there any more. Sometimes, when your apple cart gets upset, you get to ask yourself if you really still want to be in the apple business. When something forces a change or interruption of course on you, it's imperative to take the opportunity for a reality check. Is this something that you still want to be doing? Why? What was it doing for you before? How has that changed? How have you changed?

odudog
03-10-2008, 03:51 PM
One of my instructors got the same injury while doing a test. He can't wait to get back on the mat and he is a doctor and an older gentleman. If it is fine for him, I assume it should be fine for you. Just take it slow until you regain confidence in the knee. You hear professional athletes go through the same thing all the time.

Mark Uttech
03-11-2008, 02:37 AM
Onegaishimasu. Three or four months is the typical time marker where things lose their newness. Add still fresh memories of an injury and lots of enthusiasm goes out the window. So yes, this a very normal situation.

In gassho,

Mark

Tijani1150
03-12-2008, 09:58 PM
well thank you all for your input, one of the reasons that make me stay away is the feeling of being usless since I dont have that flexibility and speed which I use to have befoe this injury.. I am dissappointed at where i am compared to where I was before.

Jennifer

I was training for a year and a 1/2 before this happend, as for how I did it well it was very wierd becauase all I was doing is stepping forward to do an atemi (so Aikido has nothing to do with it, my knee just decided to go out) I think I am healed enough to practise regularly yes but not at the speed and flexibility that I use to have.

Problem is there is this concern/fear barier before executing every technique which sucks out 40 percent of the output (so I think) thats because I feel my mind is more preoccupied with this thought than the correct execution of the technique, so training with this mind frame spoils it for me and the person I am training with too.

respect to all

erikmenzel
03-20-2008, 05:55 PM
Fear is absolutly normal
I had knee surgery and after that coming back on the mat was (and sometimes still is) scary. Not being able to do certain things made me feel useless.
One thing I discovered was that the barriers and excuses I put up were actualy far worse than than the expectations of my training parteners. They didnt think it wrong or annoying that I had to start again slower and had to relearn things. They were just happy we could train together again and have been (and still are) 100% willing to adept training to my limitations.
Knowing that it wasnt about how I used to be but all about how I am now made it easier to let go and enjoy the moment instead of staying stuck in the past feeling sorry for myself.
Find joy in what you do, not in what you used to be able to do

crbateman
03-20-2008, 11:56 PM
Ahmed, all anyone can expect of you is your best, and that is all you can expect of yourself. And how can doing your best, regardless of your previous capabilities, be a sad thing? We all have to choose between sitting around living in the past, or getting on with the business of living in the now and preparing for the future. Put it behind you and move forward, doing your best...

dps
03-21-2008, 12:13 AM
I was training for a year and a 1/2 before this happend, as for how I did it well it was very wierd becauase all I was doing is stepping forward to do an atemi (so Aikido has nothing to do with it, my knee just decided to go out) I think I am healed enough to practise regularly yes but not at the speed and flexibility that I use to have.

Problem is there is this concern/fear barier before executing every technique which sucks out 40 percent of the output (so I think) thats because I feel my mind is more preoccupied with this thought than the correct execution of the technique, so training with this mind frame spoils it for me and the person I am training with too.

respect to all

I don't know how old you are but if you aren't 40 years old or up yet, when you get there you will start to find the loss of flexibility in your body increasing. You have to learn to adapt and have a good sports medicine doctor to go to.

The correct execution of the technique will be the best you can do within your limitations. We all have limitations, some more than others.

David

dragonteeth
03-26-2008, 08:38 PM
What kind of knee brace are you wearing, if any?

There are two reasons why I ask. I had an ACL reconstruction a few years back (old MA injury from teenage years). When I first started training in aikido about a year post-op, I was very concerned about damaging it. That concern would make me very tense, no matter how hard I tried to ignore it, which made it worse. Putting a reinforced (hinged) neoprene brace helped with the tension.

However, it really slowed me down because it would migrate towards my toes every 20 minutes or so. I went to my ortho doc, and he suggested a custom brace. As it turns out, there was an off the shelf brace that has worked really well for me (DonJoy Female Fource Point - but they do make a unisex version). It's lightweight, very comfortable, doesn't migrate even after three hours of rigorous practice, and definitely allows me to bend my knee a lot farther and a lot faster without pain. With it on I can go heel to butt in seiza, but still can't without it. The only downside is that the straps bled grey dye on my gi pants as I sweated. DonJoy found out, and sent me a full set of custom made chamois liners (which don't bleed) for free. I ordered mine through the local rep that calls on my MD, but you can see some of the ones that are out there here - http://jointhealing.com/pages/productpages/knee_braces_sports.html. Never ordered from them, but I've had friends who tell me they have great customer service.

I can honestly say it's saved me a lot of pain on a number of occasions, especially when I've had folks land on the side of my knee by accident. Older newbie nages turning tenkan can be deadly! Around-we-go, ver-ti-go, down-we-go! :o

So no, don't be concerned about how you feel. It's completely normal. Adding effective, comfortable protection may go a long way towards getting you back to where you were. Talk to your doc about it.

Best of luck!