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tuturuhan
03-03-2008, 11:01 AM
Please find enclosed a video of one of my students. She has studied with me for over 13 years. She teaches martial arts in Oakland, CA:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Caqtib-pK38

Though, the style is different in name, I hope their are concepts and movements that aikido stylists will affirm.

Sincerely,
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
03-03-2008, 01:58 PM
The strategy enacted here is one of ba qua and tai chi chuan. The objective is to move from one quadrant to the to the next, all the while flanking and getting behind her opponent.

Notice, that she rarely shows her "hidden knife". It only comes out after the left hand has blended, guided and manipulated her opponents. She attempts to pick off her opponents one at a time.

In this sense, she uses internal energy rather than muscle to defeat her bigger, stronger opponents. The knife insures her superiority, her ability to truly defend herself.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

Ron Tisdale
03-03-2008, 02:11 PM
Nice stuff! I really liked your (I think it was the poster) open hand work at the end.

Best,
Ron

tuturuhan
03-03-2008, 02:34 PM
Ron,

Thank you.

There are various methods we employ in using the hand work: external/male, perscussive/in-between and internal/female.

The circle is employed in a way where the striking is repetitious given the circular pathway. When adding the circular footwork, centrifical force and gravitational pull multiply the force of the hand strikes. Rather then using muscle we are using positioning and simple mechanics.

Thank you again for your comments. I choose this tape because I thought it came close to what aikido practitioners do when defending against multiple opponents.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

Ron Tisdale
03-03-2008, 03:05 PM
It is close to some of what I am familiar with in the method of evasions, the entering and pivoting. In the particular style of aikido I am the most familiar with, the entry tends to be more dramatic. I think her use of knife work is great, and suppliments the way she moves.

I do not, however, see the kind of body structure in her that I am now trying to achieve. But I believe that I do see that in your movement. Would you care to discuss the differences?

Best,
Ron

tuturuhan
03-03-2008, 04:21 PM
Ron,

Wow...good eye and quite perceptive.

It is not the amount of years vs. her years training...though I have been in practice since I was 7 years old. This is my 45th year learning martial arts,.

It is, the difference in form vs. formlessness. Most students, adhere to the need for form and structure. The problem is that the form and structure may not be correct for the utility of the technique.

Having the ability to change structure "like water" allows one to take whatever form the water takes as it blends to its opponent. Likewise, water can flow from calm, to brook, to running hard. As such, my variable in movement is subject to more gears than hers. She can go fast, medium and slow, but, is limited to three gears. My gears work along a spectrum.

If my opponent goes very fast I can choose to go very fast. But, instead, I slow down and then go fast, to blend to and then disrupt his rhythm.

Mushashi in his book of five rings discusses this concept of water far better than I do. Thank you for the conversation,.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

As such, my body is more like water than my student's body.

Sam Turnage
03-03-2008, 05:16 PM
Nice stuff, thanks for sharing. I too liked your hand work that I saw at the end, very cool!
It looks like it would blend or compliment Aikido or AJJ very well.

What is it? Look like a type of Kung-fu to me.

Regards
Sam

tuturuhan
03-03-2008, 05:36 PM
Sam,

Thank you.

It is Tai Chi Chuan and Ba qua. It is Kalijin. I have practiced many styles over the last 45 years. I started with Judo.

As for it being complimentary, yes, I am a great admirer of Aikido's founder. In his 40's he was still manhandling his opponents. I was struck by pictures showing his muscularity. But, by the time he was in his fifties he had already made the transition to "internal methods".

Sincerely,
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

Chris Parkerson
03-03-2008, 06:01 PM
I like your and your student's movement.

We move similarly when faced with mass attack.

Just a question, Why does she use the saber grip rather than the reverse grip in this exercise?"

tuturuhan
03-03-2008, 06:12 PM
Hi Chris,

Palm up, palm down. Tight grip, finger grip...

There are many reasons for the changes in structure. She is trained to use the reverse grip. She could have used said grip to pierce downward, to hook, to guide and manipulate and to further hide the knife.

However, the forward or palm up grip allows her greater finger dexterity. With the backhand grip there is a tendency to hold the weapon to hard, with tenseness. In the same way one compares the fist strike to a palm or shuto open handed strike. The open hand is fluid.

As such, with the forward grip she can use her thumb to push, and palm to role the knife and her index finger to guide and direct the weapon.

What is more important, is the left hand that measures, guides, directs and manipulates to create opening for the right handed knife. Thank you for you questions.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

Chris Parkerson
03-03-2008, 06:38 PM
Thank you as well.
great movement. Instinctive and flowing.

Ron Tisdale
03-04-2008, 08:29 AM
Thanks for the tips Joseph! Good chatting, maybe we'll get to train together sometime.

I prefer the reverse grip myself, but your comments on the grip she used were quite intelligent. I can see where with a small knife, I would get more utility from that grip than from with the reversed blade.

As to structure, I'd be interested in your comments in some of the threads where Mike Sigman, Rob John, and Dan Hardin participate.

Best,
Ron

tuturuhan
03-04-2008, 08:38 AM
In our linage, we make a distinction between the genders. There is the yang/male energy and the yin/female energy.

As such, the external martial arts are classified as being outer or muscular. The internal martial arts are seen as more connected. The idea is to "blend, to grasp and then to manipulate".

In this video she uses the rhythm of a three count beat to blend, to connect and then manipulate/knife her opponents. She has been taught not to show emotion or expression on her face. Physiologically, she is attempting to go deep inside herself.

Instead of using the straight line, she uses the circle. The "directness" of the straight line is seen as a male characteristic. She plays to the female characteristic of absorbing and engulfing her opponent.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
03-05-2008, 09:27 AM
Ron,

I will look at their comments. I have viewed some of their tapes already. Are they the main proponents of modern aikido in the US? I ask because I am not familiar with the aikido society.

So far, I like Mike's structure and no structure in his movements. In other words, outwardly he shows you a structure, but, inwardly he shows you how his whole body can be "jello". This is quite important in terms of receiving an opponent.

However, I have not yet seen him in action using his waza.

Sincerely
Joseph

Ron Tisdale
03-05-2008, 11:13 AM
Mike studied aikido some time ago, but he is not primarily an aikidoka now. If you keep reading, I believe most of his study now is taiji.

Best,
Ron

tuturuhan
03-05-2008, 11:39 AM
Ron,

Ahhh...Mike is using aikido structure and applying tai chi. He is attempting to bridge.

And what about Dan Harden? I tried looking him up on youtube. No results. Though, I relate strongly to his ideas about "no form". How everything is simply, and now I am paraphrasing "like water".

Sincerely,
Joseph

Ron Tisdale
03-05-2008, 11:47 AM
I don't know that I would classify Mike that way...but I know jack about taiji... :D

Dan is a whole 'nuther issue. Neither of these guys are small...

Dan has Daito ryu, Koryu, and MMA in his background, I believe.

Best,
Ron

tuturuhan
03-05-2008, 11:55 AM
I don't know that I would classify Mike that way...but I know jack about taiji... :D

Dan is a whole 'nuther issue. Neither of these guys are small...

Dan has Daito ryu, Koryu, and MMA in his background, I believe.

Best,
Ron

Hi Ron,

Thank you. I will try looking for tapes of these guys. Lately, I have been watching Tohei's old tapes. He was quite smooth.

Sincerely
Joseph

tuturuhan
03-06-2008, 08:59 AM
Women Teachers,

I've been lucky. In my life, I have had several woman teachers. In my linage, there is a woman called the Princess Josephina.

She moved in circles within circles. She used rhythm, fluidity, timing and manipulations to engulf her opponents. She used internal energy.

So, have you noticed a difference in the styles and methods of female martial artists. In Taoist tradition, the female, is dark, deep and water. She is internal. The male is bright, light and fire. He is external. Tai Chi, Hsing-I, Ba qua, White Crane are internal styles that use female energy.

Any thoughts?

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

CitoMaramba
03-06-2008, 09:21 AM
And Princess Josephina was blind, according to the stories...

Other Women Warriors from the Philippines:

Princess Urduja (http://www.urduja.com/princess.html): (although her existence is questioned by some historians)
Princess Urduja ancient accounts say, was a 14th century woman ruler of the dynastic Kingdom of Tawalisi in Pangasinan, a vast area lying by the shores of the Lingayen Gulf and the China Sea. Pangasinan was an important kingdom then, and the sovereign was equal to the King of China. Known far and wide, Princess Urduja was famous for leading a retinue of woman warriors who were skilled fighters and equestrians. They developed a high art of warfare to preserve their political state.

Gabriela Silang (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gabriela_Silang):
María Josefa Gabriela Cariño Silang (March 19, 1731-September 29, 1763) was the first Filipino woman to lead a revolt during the Spanish colonization of the Philippines. An active member of the insurgent force of Diego Silang, her husband, she led the group for four months after his death before she was captured and executed.

Teresa Magbanua (http://www.pia.ops.gov.ph/kalayaan/magbanua.htm)
Teresa Magbanua y Ferraris earned the distinction of being the only woman to lead combat troops in the Visayas against Spanish and American forces.

Trinidad Tecson (http://www.globalpinoy.com/ch/ch_category.php?category=heroes&name=Trinidad%20Tecson%20&table=ch_heroes&startpage=1&endpage=15)
Trinidad was already 47 years old when she joined the woman chapter of the Katipunan in 1895....Albeit signing with the blood was not required for women, Trinidad drew blood from her forearm and used it to sign her oath of loyalty, determination and affiliation to the Katipunan.
... In the battlefield, Trinidad fought side by side with men, wearing a Katipuneros outfit with a wide brimmed hat.

tuturuhan
03-06-2008, 10:16 AM
Hi Inocencio,

You know your South-East Asian history. Thank you for your reply.

I am quite grateful to my women teachers. By teaching me how to dance, they taught me how to "lead" the dance and just as important, how to use and understand the intrinsic nature of blending and following.

I personally believe that martial artists should understand and teach the differences in gender, in order to understand the complimentary natures.

But then, I have two daughters 7 and 10 and I am faced with understanding their natures.

Best wishes,
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

CitoMaramba
03-06-2008, 10:24 AM
Ginoong Arriola,

We have a saying in the Philippines, "Ang hindi lumingon sa pinanggalingan ay hindi makakarating sa paroroonan"
Roughly translated, "If you don't look back on your origins you will not get to your destination".

I also have two daughters and am learning to deal with (blend?) their female energies.

"Gumagalang" (respectfully),

Cito (Inocencio)

tuturuhan
03-06-2008, 10:48 AM
Hi Cito,

I look forward to hearing your lessons regarding raising daughters. I keep telling them that I am going to send them to a convent in the Phillippines.

My mother in law lives with us and is a tough visayan 82 year old taskmaster. So, it helps.

best wishes,
Joe

CitoMaramba
03-06-2008, 11:45 AM
Hi Joe,
I should be asking tips from you, since your daughters are older (mine are 6 and 4). :D
My wife is from Mindanao, I am from Manila. We relocated to the UK 2 years ago.
You are lucky to have your biyenan (mother-in-law) with you. My mother came from Manila and visited us for a week last month... we wish she could have stayed longer!
I think my being around all these women is helping tap into the "yin" side of martial energies :)

Gumagalang,

Cito

tuturuhan
03-06-2008, 12:42 PM
Hi Cito,

I'm laughing out loud. about the "yin" side.

However, today is my deceased mother's birthday March 6th. So, I'm just a bit sad about not having her around. My children missed meeting her.

Well, I am sure we can share are experiences.

So, what are you doing in London? I was in europe last year doing seminars. I was quite astounded at how London and Paris had changed since my last visit. We truly are in a diverse global society.

Sincerely
Joe

tuturuhan
03-07-2008, 09:17 AM
In Taosim, in current day Spanish language, everything is defined in terms of male and female.

In Spanish, the "o" represents male and the "a" represents female. Every inanimate, inorganic object is given a male or female. The same tradition takes place in taoism. The dark-shade vegetables are yin/female, and water is yin/female. Anything, upward or protruding out is considered yang/male.

Likewise, the "hidden knife" small, and unseen is a female weapon. It is the weapon that best complements a women's general superiority with small motor movements, sensitivity and dexterity of hand.

This is what you see in the video. This woman teacher hides and protects her knife. She only let's it be seen, if she wants you to see it.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
03-08-2008, 09:42 AM
Multiple Attack

It is simply the ability to multi-task without being stressed and overwhelmed. Though, she is defending against three people she is defending one opponent at a time. She is thinking three steps again. She is in the now...anticipating a change in the attack. She must fluidly adapt.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

CitoMaramba
03-08-2008, 02:14 PM
Just O-Sensei says in one of his doka:
Even through surrounded by a great number of enemy
View them as one person
And so fight on!

tuturuhan
03-09-2008, 10:02 AM
Women and Men

Well, I guess only a few people want to bite as to the differences in gender in the martial arts. In china, there were many martial arts that we supposedly founded by women. In Japan, we see how the nagigata which was originally a man's weapon became a favorite of women.

I wonder if this is a topic that is a bit too politically incorrect?

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva

Stefan Stenudd
03-09-2008, 12:35 PM
in current day Spanish language, everything is defined in terms of male and female
I might slide off-topic here, but in the Swedish language only human beings are gender specified, and sometimes not even they.

We have two kinds of neuter, not just one as in English. One with n-endings, the other with t. There is really no rule as how to apply them, you have to sort of feel it. And there is no explanation to their difference.

I don't know how that might affect Swedish aikido, but it creates huge problems for those few who want to learn our language.

tuturuhan
03-09-2008, 02:58 PM
Stefan,

I wonder though if the ancient swedish language had more gender specific words. Perhaps, given the evolution of society said swedish words were deleted from the common language

Certainly, in the U.S. that has happened. Many years ago, as a young lawyer, I was preparing for a case that required jury instructions. In the language of the jury instructions you had phases like "if you find that he committed said act...you must find him guilty of the crime."

The state legislature had just changed the law making the "jury instructions" gender free, meaning "if you should find he or she guilty...you must find he or she guilty.

It is my opinion that every nuance in the language, affects society, and thus individual behavior. Likewise, such nuances can affect our martial arts. I'm stretching a bit here...but, I believe this is one of the ways, we discern Internal Martial Art from External Martial Art.

Best wishes,
Joseph

Stefan Stenudd
03-09-2008, 04:10 PM
It is my opinion that every nuance in the language, affects society, and thus individual behavior. Likewise, such nuances can affect our martial arts. I'm stretching a bit here...but, I believe this is one of the ways, we discern Internal Martial Art from External Martial Art.
I am sure that you are right.
As far as I know, the Japanese language rarely makes the gender distinction - except for the sort of tone of language used by men being different from that of women. Maybe that corresponds to Japanese men and women practicing together, seemingly equal, but still very few women become high grade teachers.

It is also my impression that Japanese aikido teachers define aikido very much through etymology and other language considerations.
Myself, I am very fond of the word aikido, and how it can be interpreted. Still, I have to confess that the word iaido is even more mind-blowing. So I just have to practice that, too ;)

PS: Sorry about continuing to deviate from the theme of the thread.

tuturuhan
03-09-2008, 08:06 PM
Maybe that corresponds to Japanese men and women practicing together, seemingly equal, but still very few women become high grade teachers.

Stefan Sensei,

Wow...now that would be considered a very politically incorrect statement. You sir, have great courage.

The truth, is that very few people...become high grade teachers. You sir, I admire for your truth of statement.

However, I would put some of my women students against most men, provided a knife in their hands.

I love the layers of your practice. You go far beyond your practice of aikido. It exhibits itself in your intellect, interests and life. That sir, is indicative of a high grade teacher.

Best
Joseph

Timothy WK
03-10-2008, 07:26 AM
My only comment is that the attackers are only attacking one at a time, for the most part. So it still seems like a training exercise, rather than a, err... combat simulation. (Not to imply that there's anything wrong with that.)

But she looked pretty good, to my (untrained knife-fighting) eyes.

tuturuhan
03-10-2008, 07:40 AM
My only comment is that the attackers are only attacking one at a time, for the most part. So it still seems like a training exercise, rather than a, err... combat simulation. (Not to imply that there's anything wrong with that.)

But she looked pretty good, to my (untrained knife-fighting) eyes.

Sir,

Actually, her strategy was to position herself so that they had to attack seemingly one at a time. If you review the tape you will notice that when they attempted to to attack two at a time...she would either split them, or use the other as a barrier/shield. They would be knocked into each other.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
03-10-2008, 11:05 AM
Ok,

I like the practice with women. There is a crackle of energy between the yin and the yang. If the male/female couple are free with each other, their is a connection of energy unlike the male/male energy. Yes, there is an attraction

From a practical point of view, as I aged, I found that I could not do the muscular things that I could in my teens, twenties, thirties or even forties. I shifted to the yin. I shifted to the internal energy beginning in my late twenties. My structure of my technique changed over the years. My strong, could be made stronger. My soft became pushed beyond my expectations. My technique and concepts now had a tool to hone themselves even as I got older.

Working with women, in the most positive sense is like the ballroom dance...male energy and female energies in synergy.

Sincerely
Joseph

Stefan Stenudd
03-10-2008, 11:27 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Caqtib-pK38
Though, the style is different in name, I hope there are concepts and movements that aikido stylists will affirm.
Definitely. I can very much relate to the continous evasive movements, sort of like water around the attackers.

In taninzugake - several opponents - I think it is most important to be able to move with continuous taisabaki, and the techniques come second.

There are many other similarities to aikido on the video clip - and some others at your YouTube account that I hurried to see.
For example, I see the strikes as almost the same thing as the movements of an aikido technique - controlling and guiding the whole body of the attacker, more than trying to harm him or her.

tuturuhan
03-10-2008, 11:50 AM
[QUOTE=Stefan Stenudd;201338]Definitely. I can very much relate to the continous evasive movements, sort of like water around the attackers.

Hi Stefan,

It will be so fun to meet you, practice and discuss our joint love of martial arts.

I told you I watched your tape of ikkyu. Funny, I kept thinking about it. I compared it in mind to what we do in our practice. The woman student in the tape, I believe is doing ikkyu. It's just that the movements a bit smaller. The hands raise to blend (the ballon) you manipulate to the outside and then the joint technique.

For me striking and joint application, and throw are the same technique. It's just that to the beginner, they look stunningly different. One of the one comes the many.

Sincerely
Joseph

tuturuhan
03-11-2008, 09:30 AM
Its Nature

They adage, "Women are the deadlier of the species". The evolutionary biologists explain to us the structure of nature is one of utility. The alpha female directs and guides the wolf pack, the wild mustang herd, and the elephant tribe. She makes the decisions and everyone goes along.

Likewise, in nature it is the female that does most of the hunting and the killing. The alpha male, is feed, gets to "war upon" and is protected by the females of the herd from all other males who wish to have his position.

Recent studies have shown that it is the "females of the tribe" specifically in monkeys that decide whether or not a male will have position of hieracrchy.

Because of the female's higher communication skills, "she can guide and direct...and thus mutli-tasks and is affective against the multiple attack.

The "hidden knife" is one of her weapons. It is not large (not yang). It nature is not to use intimidation. It's nature is one of need and necessity. Hunting, killing is essential if her family is to survive. (Likewise, in any martial art...we must not deny its nature...all martial arts are "maritial")

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
03-12-2008, 10:27 AM
Stimulus & Response

So why do we practice with the knife? And do men and women practice the same with it.

Well, in my practice I do not allow a male student to use the "live knife" for a least a minimum of two years of solid training. Yet, I allow the women to use the knife almost immediately. Well, I actually start my women students with the use of the "Fan" as a weapon.

The reason for the gender distinction has to do with physiological, anatomical, and brain function. First, we look at "fine motor movement" vs. "gross motor movement". Women in general are simply better at fine motor movement. Take my 7 year old daughter and compare her to a 7 year old boy in how they manipulate a pair of scissors. The boy gets frustrated with fine motor movement and the girl is quite content with her detailed skills.

Using the small knife demands dexterity.

Second, in terms of fight vs. flight. Women exhibit less of the hormone adrenelin when confronted with the stimulus of an attack (fear). The result is that they are less "shaky" when first learning the knife. It takes years before the male student, becomes detail oriented. It is difficult for him to give up the "gross motor movements" which go hand and hand with muscling technique rather than using finesse.

Third, the practical matter, the "nature" of martial arts is such that self defense is important. I must make sure my women students can defend themselves if attacked by a bigger, stronger man. The knife gives them that ability. Yet, they must use the knife is a dark, deep, secretive manner. In taoism, the black represents female energy. It is deep, hidden and filled with the secrets of knowledge.

Now, as to men...as we get older, we learn to muscle less. We learn to control our emotions. We learn to be practical and less idealistic. There is less time for bravado when you are in your 50's.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
03-15-2008, 10:31 AM
Stimulus & Response Part II

We use the knife to multiply the ability for a woman to defend herself. We use the knife to change the paradigm. To go from the mat, the ring and then to the actual possibility of being cut changes everything.

After two years men students are allowed to hold the "live knife". They are also allowed to to be uke against the knife. Before then, they cannot be trusted. The stimulus of the knife causes a surge of adrenelin and shakiness as a response. By learning to control their emotions during the two years previous, they are now ready to control their emotions when going against the knife. Next, they get to hold it and play with it.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
03-17-2008, 10:24 AM
Goddess Kali

She is dark. She is deep. She is powerful. Kali is not simply the goddess of death and destruction. She is the goddess of birth and creativity,

When my teacher's teacher first encountered the Princess Josephina, on the island of Samar, in the village of Gundari, he knew only that the "method of warfare" moved in circles.

He was told by the chieftain of the tribe that he should go down to the river. It was there he would encounter the one that would teach him the Kali.

When he reached the river the next day, he encountered a woman standing near the water. He approached her and asked if she knew of a teacher that taught the Kali.

She replied, "I am that teacher". This begins the story of the Blind Princess Josephina, one of the great teachers in our linage.
(When you again watch the video of the "woman teacher" using your knife, imagine the Blind Princess as she used sensitivity to thwart her opponents.)

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
03-18-2008, 10:08 AM
Man to Woman...knife to openhand

In my training, I am always comparing and contrasting. How does a man move compared to how a woman moves? The assumption is always one of strength vs. weakness.

This is a valid supposition. It is based on nature of humans overall. On average, men have a greater muscularity which gives them a greater strength.

Likewise, in women, they have a greater "sensitivity" and a greater "tolerance for pain". As such, women too, have "qualities" that when placed side by side (compare and contrast) to men are far superior.

I practice with and teach women because I want to get better. More so, I practice with women so that I can continue to win in combat against the younger guys.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
03-20-2008, 09:11 AM
Protecting the Son

The Hidden Knife is a weapon in transition. Just as the yin and yang are the 2 that become the 4 (the seeds of white and black in the larger black and white areas.)

The hidden knife starts out as Black, as female. It is hidden and secretive. But, when the seed of white arises, the knife is born as male. It peeks out from the depths and shows itself as it strikes.

Yet, it is not fully Yang/Male. It must be protected by its mother. The left hand, guides and directs. It orchestrates, the environment for the protection of the hidden knife/Minor Yang.

When you watch the woman teacher in the tape. She not only hides the knife at every turn. She is attempting to protect the knife, so it is not taken away. She guides and directs the knife, putting it into peril. She does so just as she would put into peril her own son.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
03-22-2008, 08:59 AM
Metaphorical to Literal and Back Again

I like talking about "women using knives" because there is a built-in analysis of the Yin and Yang. We aren't simply talking philosophy. We are talking life. We aren't just talking about "flow and internal energy". We have a literal description when we watch a capable woman doing martial arts.

When I was a young man it was an oddity to see a truly adept woman doing martial arts. Today, it is the same. How many of the woman do we know could truly defend themselves? How many men do we know could truly defend themselves?

Professions of belts, titles and teachers in linage all talk about political hierarchy more than actual martial skill. (Though, undoubtably there is skill in politics and moving up the hierarchy. Don't get me wrong, I show a respect for all skill).

Interestingly, in determining "this skill in martial arts" the beginner, the intermediate and even most of those who call themselves experts can't really "see" true skill in a practitioner. Like the elusive chi, blood flow is unseen as it travels through the arteries into and out of the heart. To follow the flow scientists and doctors use tracers and tags to follow what they cannot see.

The woman is Yin. She represents the deep, the dark and the secret knowledge that cannot be seen with normal eyes. When you put a knife in her hands, you see what had been hidden. You have used the knife as a tracer, a tag to follow the internal energy.

Sincerely
Joseph t. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
03-25-2008, 11:18 AM
Blend,

Ok, so I post on here as a bit of a challenge. I am not an aikido stylist. But, I wish to engage any stylist to test my skills.

As such, if you fought against a karate stylist, a gung fu man or even a capoeira stylist how would you blend?

In the tape provided the woman teacher is faced with three opponents that she must blend to. I provided this tape because it is the closest in terms of vision to aikido movements. Perhaps, some of you might "see" aikido in the movements.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
03-27-2008, 10:45 AM
What is blending?

In today's society there is an ambivilance, an ambidexterity a belief that both sides of the body perform the same function.

Most young people have been taught that they are the center of the universe...that they deserve a medal just for signing up for soccer. Everyone is equal and everyone is entitled.

In fact, there is a hierarchy. Those who put in the daily practice, those who seek to go beyond acceptance beliefs learn not to expect others to blend to them...but that they but blend to others.

The teacher does not simply give out his knowledge. The student must wish to emulate him, to absorb his knowledge. He must blend.

This is what we learn from Yin Martial Art.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

Kevin Leavitt
03-27-2008, 11:13 AM
Actually I think the opposite. everyone is equal and every one is entitled. With that entitlement comes great responsibility to realize that we are all in it together...interconnected with the universe. Our actions we choose matter.

Those that adhere to the hierarchy, that put in the work, many times are the ones that end up with the biggest egos and sense of entitlement over others.

Seek to understand, not be understood.

Teachers, if they are genuine, give freely because they love to give, they have no expectation about the students ability or merit.

tuturuhan
03-27-2008, 11:46 AM
Actually I think the opposite. everyone is equal and every one is entitled. With that entitlement comes great responsibility to realize that we are all in it together...interconnected with the universe. Our actions we choose matter.

Those that adhere to the hierarchy, that put in the work, many times are the ones that end up with the biggest egos and sense of entitlement over others.

Seek to understand, not be understood.

Teachers, if they are genuine, give freely because they love to give, they have no expectation about the students ability or merit.

Mr Levitt,

Ah...a point of contention. The standard belief is that "ego" is a bad thing. Perhaps, ego can be seen as a good thing...no?

Of course, I have difficulty with the "young masters" who have no skill to back of their egos. The metric should be result rather than false talk.

Yes, I do think my generation screwed up badly. We eliminated words of respect like "thank you, your welcome, and yes sir and no mai'm. These words taught the hierarchy of respect.

Thank you for your comments.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

George S. Ledyard
03-27-2008, 12:41 PM
What is blending?

In today's society there is an ambivilance, an ambidexterity a belief that both sides of the body perform the same function.

Most young people have been taught that they are the center of the universe...that they deserve a medal just for signing up for soccer. Everyone is equal and everyone is entitled.

In fact, there is a hierarchy. Those who put in the daily practice, those who seek to go beyond acceptance beliefs learn not to expect others to blend to them...but that they but blend to others.

The teacher does not simply give out his knowledge. The student must wish to emulate him, to absorb his knowledge. He must blend.

This is what we learn from Yin Martial Art.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

I have a bit of a different take on this. Everybody complians about how we have gone too far towards the "empowerment" side of the spectrum with our children.

But there is a very good reason that the pendulum has swung this far. When I was growing up everyone faced barriers based on racism, sexism, class, etc. I had a friend who wanted to be a doctor. She was talked out of it by her parents and convinced that teaching was more suitable for a girl. She always regretted it and at 35 went back to med school and became a doctor.

When I was young, which was in the post WWII period of uber conformity, people made their choices based on a set of social expectations. If the attempted to disregard these expectations they ran into outright discrimination. Yes, certain exceptionally strong individuals did make it despite these impediments but most folks don't have the support or the simple strength of will to do that.

My generation has attempted to re-balance the system and not pass these socially determined limits on to our kids. The result has been a swing towards a sense of entitlement. Well, sports is one of the great ways that our kids learn that whereas they all have the opportunity, only hard work gets you a win. I think when kids are little, everyone should get a medal just for showing up. In my kid's soccer leagues, everyone plays, period. The emphasis is on giving each and every child the opportunity to play, the encouragement to do his best, etc.

As the kids hit the junior high age, competition becomes more important. The kids with great talent and strong desire go into select leagues. Other kids play for their school teams. Some kids stay in the regular leagues and play more for fun and exercise. Because the playing field was even from the start and everyone was told he or she could do it if they tried, it was the competition which gradually gave the kids a sense of how things work in the world. If you work hard you do better. Some folks are more talented at certain things than you are and they will rise to the top. My kids all eventually came to the realization that none of them was destined for the English Premier leagues... none had the talent or really wanted it that much anyway. The competition took care of that without our having to set any limitations on the kids. No one told them they couldn't do it.

I think the same thing has been true of Aikido but without the competition to sort things out so clearly. The art has morphed from being a martial art which required that you applied and were accepted to train. It was very exclusive and the Founder didn't even wish the public to see the techniques he taught. The art was not adapted to the students, the students adapted to the art or left.

After the war the decision was made to spread the art world wide. Now the dojo is open to anyone. We actually advertise to bring in new students. The art is being adapted to this new situation. Overall, I think this is fine. Aikido has become accessible. Huge numbers of people train in our art who probably would never have trained in martial arts at all otherwise.

We have chosen, for the most part, to reward those who train and stay in the art by promoting them. We have kyu ranks and dan ranks and moving up these ranks does not entail defeating anyone else, no win and lose... on some level everyone is a winner. This is fine I think.

Those of us who have a great concern for "falling standards" and ranks that seems meaningless have had to realize that all of this is personal choice on the part of each teacher. I once asked Ikeda Sensei what the "standard" was for dan testing. He told me that I had to set the standard. I was the teacher and I determined what my expectations were for my students. So that is what I have done. My expectations are different than others. I have fewer yudansha than some others teachers because I have a different set of expectations.

I used to worry about this but I have come to realize that the rank doesn't mean much anyway. People see what the quality is regardless of what rank you have. So within my own school people know what the expectations are and they know that outside it can be different. No one has to be told they can't do it or is held back. Actually, I tell them the opposite. Every one of them has the capacity to achieve some level of mastery of this art. It will simply depend on how hard they work and what innate capacity they started with.

So over time, these students will rise up in the ranks. Some will get shodan due to exceptional ability and it might take a relatively short time. Some will take twice as long and work twice as hard because things don't come so easily. Those that don't want to do the work will either leave or will not get there. But I put out that they can all do it and I teach accordingly.

I no longer worry so much about the rank and standards issue. Really, there are only two types of practitioner, students and teachers. As the dan ranks have swelled to accommodate the folks who have trained for so many decades, adjustment has been made at the top to designate those who have attained the higher standard. We now have 7th Dans and Shihans. I have yet to see anyone who has that status who isn't highly competent at what he or she has been taught. So does it matter that a 4th Dan doesn't mean the same thing it did 40 years ago? I don't think so. Everyone knows who the top people are and the system will eventually acknowledge that.

Mary Heiny Sensei is a good example of that. She dropped out of the system years ago and has been independent ever since. But here ability has spoken for itself. She received promotion from a teacher even though she was not his student, simply because he felt she should have the recognition. She teaches widely around the country at dojos which are not in any way under her nor is she part of their organizational structure. Why? Because her ability as a teacher simply stands out.

So, I think that the whole "empowerment" issue has by and large been positive. Many more people have been brought into the art. They will be rewarded in some way for their efforts and time in and they will be happy with that. Yet the best amongst them will find a way to rise farther and faster. The ones who want it the most will get it and no one has to be held back or told they can't do it... In fact they can all be told the exact opposite. Everyone CAN do it, only a few will. That is different than it was when I was younger and many people were told they couldn't based on sets of expectations which had nothing to do with them personally.

tuturuhan
03-27-2008, 01:45 PM
[QUOTE=George S. Ledyard;202695]I have a bit of a different take on this. Everybody complians about how we have gone too far towards the "empowerment" side of the spectrum with our children.

But there is a very good reason that the pendulum has swung this far. When I was growing up everyone faced barriers based on racism, sexism, class, etc. I had a friend who wanted to be a doctor. She was talked out of it by her parents and convinced that teaching was more suitable for a girl. She always regretted it and at 35 went back to med school and became a doctor.

Mr. Ledyard,

Thank you.

Though, my father was a farm worker, immigrant and never made more than $4000 a year; the land of opportunity gave his son the opportunity to become a lawyer, married to a lawyer, with two fine children and money in the bank.

I used to do a lot of divorce law. Let me tell you "empowerment" destroyed lots of families.

1) 52% divorce rate

2) 70% of the population on the verge of bankruptcy (as stated by the great sage Ophrah)

3) 70% of the population suffering from obesity and related illnesses (as stated by the great sage Ophrah)

4) Instant Gratification through empowerment as created:
A. Saving rate of less than -.05 percent vs the Chinese at 33%
B. Credit Card average balances of over 12,000
C, Average 42 year old has less than $2000 in the bank

My perspective has less to do with the ideals of love and more so with the practical results of putting a roof over my families head and food on their table.

I worry tremendously about the imbalances of "empowerment and entitlement". I personally think that it is important that their be "tags" that represent actual skill and ability.

But, thank you sir for the lively conversation.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

Kevin Leavitt
03-27-2008, 04:11 PM
Joseph wrote:

Mr Levitt,

Ah...a point of contention. The standard belief is that "ego" is a bad thing. Perhaps, ego can be seen as a good thing...no?

Of course, I have difficulty with the "young masters" who have no skill to back of their egos. The metric should be result rather than false talk.

Yes, I do think my generation screwed up badly. We eliminated words of respect like "thank you, your welcome, and yes sir and no mai'm. These words taught the hierarchy of respect.

Thank you for your comments.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

I would not say it is a point of contention as much as it is a different view on the same subject.

I don't think I said anything about ego being good or bad...ego simply is what it is..ego. It is when you make decisions or take actions based simply on your own perception without considering the impact that makes a decision an ego centric decision.

That impact may be good or bad...as it may be that your perception may lead to a result that is acceptable to what is generally judged as having good merit by those that it impacts.

That is why I think it is important to seek to understand before being undersood..or considering other perspectives, educating ourselves and attempting to be exposed to new things.

I think this is what enlightment is about..but that is a different conversation.

As far as "young masters" having no skill to back up there egos...not sure really what that means other than maybe someone is holding themselves out to be something that they are not? AKA a "poser".

All I can say is "be true to thine self".

Sure we run into those guys. I certainly have to work hard to make sure that I don't enter that category, I think it is easy to fall prey to at some level for all of us.

Being that...I have enough to do to worry about myself rather than dealing with Posers...they have their own issues...why do I need to concern myself with them?

I understand where you are coming from with the whole respect issue. I am an officer in the military and have been in it for about 24 years all they way up through the ranks...so I live in a very hierarchial world.

However, I also have kids, I expect them to be polite, considerate...no not that...COMPASSIONATE. but I think we are past the superficial courtesies of Yes sir, no m'am, at least for my family. A simple yes, with a look in the eye conveys enough meaning. Yet, listening deeply to what the other person is saying is even more important than "yes sir". (You can say that and mean FU by the way).

Also simple courtesy is taking the time to make sure you spell someone's name properly :) (no big deal though, couldn't resist).

People around me say "Yes Sir'. Ask "How was your day". "did you have a good weekend?"

How many of them (US, me included), take the time to pause, listening deeply, and really mean it?

tuturuhan
03-27-2008, 06:27 PM
Mr. Leavitt,

I apologize for spelling your name incorrectly. But then, who hasn't had their name spelled incorrectly? Who hasn't misintrepreted or gotten angry over "words"? (I too, couldn't resist)

I agree, understanding is quite valuable. Why do you think "words of respect" continue to be instituted in the military? Why do you think that whenever I encounter another parent, an old school teacher or a barrista at Starbucks, I address them with yes sir or no maim?

I do not expect others to call me by my titles. I do not expect them to know my skills or accomplishments. I do not expect them to be polite by saying "yes sir" to a valued customer. Though, it would be a good business practice.

We are not intimate. As such, we keep our distance, and we do so respectfully.

Conversation allows us our view points. It allows us to make contact and to begin the steps of understanding. Sometimes, the statements must be bold and provocative to illicit responses. Nonetheless, their is dialogue.

I test my skills to "blend and grasp". I engage and I receive. I pause, I listen and to answer your question...most people do not do so...but, my children are being trained to be polite and respectful with words of respect and courtesy.

Sincerely,
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

Kevin Leavitt
03-27-2008, 08:13 PM
Again, no problem on the name thing. I understand. :)

There is no issue with showing respect, certainly it is appropriate.

I think it is good when it is done out of geniune sincerity and respect...and not solely based on position or authority.

Certainly many do not have that for each other in the world today. Again, for me, it is based on mutual respect...that is what is key.

That exists in most dojos I have been in for sure.

I am sure for many it is also a matter of culture and societal norms...that is fine too.

However, when we start judging the merit of others who don't do things exactly the way we do them...that is, they may have different culture and norms...then we have issues.

It doesn't necessarily mean that society is downfalling because we are not a homogenous society like 1950 suburban "Leave it to Beaver" as Ledyard Sensei eloquently described.

It simply may mean that people demonstrate respect and compassion in different ways.

Albeit, I think it is our charge as aikidoka to set good examples for others to see, not to be in judgement.

That does not mean that we need to preach or expect others to do things our way...simply we set the example and try and help people maybe expand their horizons a little...maybe to see the world from another perspective.

Be the change you want to see in the world.

George S. Ledyard
03-27-2008, 08:19 PM
Mr. Ledyard,

Thank you.

Though, my father was a farm worker, immigrant and never made more than $4000 a year; the land of opportunity gave his son the opportunity to become a lawyer, married to a lawyer, with two fine children and money in the bank.

Obviously a success story... but this land of opportunity has not always provided such opportunity to all as I mentioned.

I used to do a lot of divorce law. Let me tell you "empowerment" destroyed lots of families.

1) 52% divorce rate

In the old days, the divorce rate was far less. Fine. That didn't mean people were actually happy in their relationships. Women were often completely trapped in marriages as there was no way a single woman could survive economically. Men stayed married but it was accepted that they played around or frequented prostitutes... The Catholic church made divorce impossible. Careers were ended if one divorced. So people who shouldn't have stayed together and lived lives of desperation.

If "empowerment" means not staying in abusive marriage, not staying with someone who doesn't love you, not staying in a marriage in which all the power is one sided, then fine, I guess maybe you could say "empowerment" causes divorce but I guess i am also fine with that.

2) 70% of the population on the verge of bankruptcy (as stated by the great sage Ophrah)

Financial pressures are cited as one of the primary contributing factors in divorce. Yes, divorce amongst the middle class is often a financial disaster as fortunes which took years to build are split up. But for the majority of folks, they barely have anything anyway. The fact that so many people are close to bankruptcy is independent of their being divorced or not. Plenty of quite happily married people are broke. It is a fact that most small business startups fail. These are folks who work their tails off, try to create something of value, but they fail anyway. I don't see these people as somehow harmed by "empowerment", in fact quite the opposite.

The folks who run these small businesses that don't make it, usually turn around and try again. Often they try several times until they get it right and they create something sustainable. The folks who can do that... pick themselves up and start again, well, someone, somewhere gave them the confidence and will power to do that. That's the "empowerment" I am talking about. And I see it as positive


3) 70% of the population suffering from obesity and related illnesses (as stated by the great sage Ophrah)

This one really escapes me... We live in an economy which spends billions of dollars creating a market for unhealthy foods. At the same time our crazy business ethic says that we should be working overtime to attain a "lifestyle" that is unsustainable on a planetary basis. Our economy is driven by consumption. If people were to stop buying things which are unhealthy or unnecessary, we would be in total economic collapse.

Obesity is a direct result of an unhealthy lifestyle associated with our capitalist consumer culture upon which most people's livelihoods depend (2/3 of the average supermarket is stocked with items which we definitively know to be detrimental to our health). If you look at countries like Japan, they are having precisely the same problems with skyrocketing obesity rates. I fail to see how this is the result of "empowerment" or "entitlement".

We have bought into a life style based on speed, we are an ADD society. Our entire economy is based on this and billions and billions of dollars are spent to make sure that we stay that way. I cannot turn on the TV or the radio, pick up a newspaper, or even surf the net without encountering a barrage of propaganda trying to convince me to eat what I shouldn't, more frequently than I should.

We do jobs which do not require physical exertion, try to be super parents by over scheduling our kids, work too late, work the weekends, etc Families find it hard to accomplish all the things they've been told they need to be doing and even sit down to have a family meal together. I don't see that as the result of "empowerment".In fact I see people in desperate need of "empowerment" to help them break this ridiculous cycle. Everything in the culture runs counter to making these changes.

Nope, I definitely don't see how "empowerment" of our youth creates fat kids... In fact I am obese myself and I can tell you I had the traditional strict upbringing with traditional family values galore... But I am still addicted to carbs, despite the fact that I didn't get the type of empowerment you seem to oppose so strongly.


4) Instant Gratification through empowerment as created:
A. Saving rate of less than -.05 percent vs the Chinese at 33%
B. Credit Card average balances of over 12,000
C, Average 42 year old has less than $2000 in the bank

Once again, while these things are true, I fail to see how "empowerment" created this. Perhaps you feel that empowerment has gone too far in some cases. I would say that is probably true. But our lack of savings is determined largely by the consumer economy that devotes every resource it can into getting all of us to believe that we can't wait for that new car, that we need to have the huge house in the more expensive neighborhood, that even folks who simply can't afford things should buy them anyway. If I and my neighbors wait tow years to buy our new car, tens of thousands of workers in Detroit lose their jobs.

The whole economy is driven by consumers who are trained to believe that their worth as individuals has to do with their material success and that the stuff they buy is how they demonstrate that worth. I don't see "empowerment" as the cause of this problem. in fact, true "empowerment" is the solution. Give people a sense of worth that is independent of acquisition... give them something that gives their lives meaning apart from the race to own more stuff. That's real "empowerment". I see Aikido practice as one of many forms of that type of "empowerment".


My perspective has less to do with the ideals of love and more so with the practical results of putting a roof over my families head and food on their table.

I worry tremendously about the imbalances of "empowerment and entitlement". I personally think that it is important that their be "tags" that represent actual skill and ability.


Somehow you seem to associate the terms "entitlement" and "empowerment" with some sort of unreal, undeserved set of expectations. The terms as I use them have none of the "something for nothing" take that you ascribe to them. I am talking about people who know that they are "entitled" to have the same opportunities to achieve that everyone else has, just like you've had. I am talking about people who as individuals feel "empowered" to take risks, work hard, go for their dreams, not let others tell them they can't. Maybe you and I are talking about different meanings to these words because what I am talking about allows people to be the best they wish to be and to be happy with that. Can't see that as a negative...

tuturuhan
03-27-2008, 08:31 PM
Mr. Leyard,

I find it interesting that you speak from idealism. Yet, I don't here you giving your actual experiences.

My wife is a domestic violence attorney and knows first hand, not from what she reads in the newspapers.

Racism, prejudice etc etc...I lived in a time when their were separate bathrooms for people like you and people like me. Yet, I still think that this is the greatest country in the world in terms of opportunity.

Yet, I am saddened. I have seen first hand the result of several generations of people on "welfare"...how it had become habitual. Sometimes, those who supposedly give and give their love...only imprison the less fortunate with their "entitlements".

We as a nation are on the verge of a great change. We must either step up to the plate or continue to play in our dojos.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

Kevin Leavitt
03-27-2008, 08:59 PM
..and also some people simply cannot seem to escape being victims. How do you help those that do not genuinely seem to want to take advantage of opportunity that seem to constantly fall back on the victim mentality?

How long do we continue to blame "the man"?

How long do you let society and the government keep you down with Welfare?

How long do you accept suffering as your fate?

At what point do people become responsible for their own actions and take control of their life?

Having spent time in some really bad places and see people survive and rise to the occassion...It becomes hard for me to understand why it seems to be so hard for people in a country such as the U.S to take advantage of the opportunities..no matter how small they may seem.

Please don't take this as categorical judgement...they are just questions that come to my mind sometimes.

From my philosophical standpoint, it is not so much money, cars, and the upper middle class that enslave people..as much as it is their own minds.

Victor Frankl comes to mind right now.

tuturuhan
03-28-2008, 09:50 PM
Again, no problem on the name thing. I understand. :)

However, when we start judging the merit of others who don't do things exactly the way we do them...that is, they may have different culture and norms...then we have issues.

It doesn't necessarily mean that society is downfalling because we are not a homogenous society like 1950 suburban "Leave it to Beaver" as Ledyard Sensei eloquently described.

It simply may mean that people demonstrate respect and compassion in different ways.

That does not mean that we need to preach or expect others to do things our way...simply we set the example and try and help people maybe expand their horizons a little...maybe to see the world from another perspective.

Be the change you want to see in the world.

Major Leavitt,

I agree.

I am a bit of a sticklier when it comes to words. I tend to believe that when you "name" something it takes on the characteristics good and bad.

For instance, the word manipulation bothers a lot of people. They have judged the word and have given it negative connotations. I simply look at the word and understand that "mani" is latin for hand. So, when I manipulate a pen...I am simply moving it.

As for pre-judgements and being "judgmental"...I think it is important to make assumptions based on our past experiences. I tell my children to look both ways before they cross the street. This means they must pre-judge and be judgmental.

As for preaching...this is what leaders must do.

Sincerely,
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

Kevin Leavitt
03-29-2008, 06:52 AM
I think you and I have polar philosophical views. I personally do not really believe in "good" and "bad" necessarily, or at least that things can be put in neat boxes labeled good and bad. I believe good or bad depends on your perspective and angle. what is good for one may be bad for another. (I am talking on a philosophical level, not a societal level).

Interesting I never heard the word manipulation bother anyone. I am sure it can though in some way. (again, perspective and angle).

Making assumptions based on our past experiences can be "good" or "bad". touching a hot stove and remembering our experience for the future may help us. "Fire...hot...bad". however, we can make judgements and assumptions that are based on incomplete facts or delusion.

If I meet a person of color for the first time and he is illiterate and metally handicap, do I make the assumption that all persons of of color (non-white) must be inferior to whites?

Might sound absurb today, but we make decisions like that all the time!

I just moved from Germany back to the states. In Germany my kids could approach a crosswalk and not have to really look both ways before they crossed because you could bet with your life that they would stop on you even looking at the crosswalk.

In Northern Virginina...go ahead and try that and you get a completely different experience!

So, in this case, their past experiences are different from what they experience.

I think common sense obviously applies...but I try and teach my kids to look closer and deeper and to always be aware that things change and new criteria are constantly entering the equation. That and their own ignorance and delusion is what they must constantly strive to overcome.

Less judgement more "stripping away" I think is better.

I disagree with you on leaders need to preach. If I did this in the military I'd have no soldiers to lead (at least from an intrinsic/authentic leadership base). Authoritative..yes...they have to do what I say.

the military has spent a great deal of money training me to not preach, but to Teach, Assess, and Counsel.

I ran one of the largest training centers in the U.S. Army. Our job was to create the environment and conditions to allow commanders and soldiers to make mistakes, execute their plans, and provide them lessons learned that they could incorporate (internalize) into their own.

Preaching (directing) doesn't teach anyone anything other..or if it does...it is a very ineffficient mechanism for delivery.

You can lead a horse to water...comes to mind.

All we can do is present new information, examples, ideas and hope that those around us open up to them.

Again, I go back to Ghandi...be the change you want to see in the world.

Don't preach it. be it.

tuturuhan
03-29-2008, 09:36 AM
[QUOTE=Kevin Leavitt;202795]I think you and I have polar philosophical views. I personally do not really believe in "good" and "bad" necessarily, or at least that things can be put in neat boxes labeled good and bad. I believe good or bad depends on your perspective and angle. what is good for one may be bad for another. (I am talking on a philosophical level, not a societal level).

Interesting I never heard the word manipulation bother anyone. I am sure it can though in some way. (again, perspective and angle).

Major Leavitt,

Well, communication is quite interesting. When you say polar, you begin with two ends of a spectrum. Most people in our society think in terms of right and wrong because of the "acceptance" of the "idea" of a linear spectrum. In fact, it is more like a spiral.

What seems right now turns out to be wrong later. What is wrong now changes to right later. As such, point of agreement: I too, believe that perspective changes our views of right and wrong.

Preaching is a form of direction and motivation. The message of the preacher is to provide hope. It is why religion brings comfort to billions of people. It, religion is also the basis for the death and destruction of people and cultures and millions of innocent people. The armies of the world have gone into combat shouting the mantra of the rightness of their religious viewpoints.

As such, what seems to be right in hindsight may be wrong and what seems to be wrong now is viewed as right in the future., A leader knows how to adapt to change.

Have you viewed the tape I provided? Notice that the woman teacher is constantly changes, multi-tasking and orchestrating the defense of the multiple attack. The method is not choreographed, She changes with the attack. She flanks and seeks the best position of offense and defense. She doesn't move in a linear spectrum of right and wrong. She spirals.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
04-07-2008, 12:57 PM
Comparing and Contrasting

The knife is small, unseen and protected from its mother. The transmits its knowledge to its older brother the staff.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
04-09-2008, 10:30 AM
Weapons Transference

It is true that once you experience the box of one weapon and then a second and third weapon you begin to see a pattern of concept.

You learn that you can throw the knife as a projectile, you can also throw the stick as a projectile. However, each weapon as a speciality, an essence that is its being.

The wooden weapon, staff, shinai, bokken, demand that they be used in a percussive fashion. The knife, the sword, both demand a flowing technique.

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

Michael Douglas
04-11-2008, 10:12 AM
I don't see many comments on the knife video.
This one seems the best so far ; My only comment is that the attackers are only attacking one at a time, for the most part. So it still seems like a training exercise, rather than a, err... combat simulation.
I'd say it is obviously just a training exercise, a very low-level understressed one ... easy if you like.
It would seem difficult to fail to stab/cut slomo zombies over and over again as they stagger past you with one arm out.

Can we see something which could train someone to deal with human attackers?

Edit ; The knife, the sword, both demand a flowing technique.
No they don't. They absolutely do NOT demand a flowing technique.
Sure, you can swordfight with flowing technique but you can also very effectively swordfight with jerky stacatto technique.

tuturuhan
04-11-2008, 10:23 AM
I don't see many comments on the knife video.
This one seems the best so far ;
I'd say it is obviously just a training exercise, a very low-level understressed one ... easy if you like.
It would seem difficult to fail to stab/cut slomo zombies over and over again as they stagger past you with one arm out.

Can we see something which could train someone to deal with human attackers?

Michael,

It is the first move that is important. The rest is the practice of flanking and positioning.

In other words, one must use his imagination in what would happen if "she" actually cut him in the neck with a "live blade" We could easily use catsup and special affects to make it look "more real".

She would "kill" each opponent one by one. In other words, she is not fighting them all at the same time. She is fighting "only one" and then positioning for the next.

Likewise, If I am fighting a 6'5" 250 pound muscular giant, I would be a fool to fight the "whole of him". Instead, I cut off a finger. I stab him in the leg. Then I go for the kill. I slit his throat...and blood is everywhere. Geez...sounds like the movies. :)

Yes, in a few weeks, I will put something up that is more akin to what people want to see...freestyle sparring.

Best,
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

tuturuhan
04-11-2008, 10:36 AM
Michael,

This is more of a taste of what most people what to see regarding "freestyle".

Michele and her students: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1buhhQjTLU

Sincerely
Joseph T. Oliva Arriola

Michael Douglas
04-20-2008, 06:17 PM
It is the first move that is important. The rest is the practice of flanking and positioning.
Yes I wholeheartedly agree the first move is the important one.
Do you have a clip showing what she can do against an attacker not restricted to the following ;
- slomo
- zombie
- stagger past
- one arm out.