PDA

View Full Version : Poll: Do you think physical aikido techniques can be totally explained by physics alone?


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


AikiWeb System
02-03-2008, 01:30 AM
AikiWeb Poll for the week of February 3, 2008:

Do you think physical aikido techniques can be totally explained by physics alone?

I don't do aikido
Yes
No


Here are the current results (http://www.aikiweb.com/polls/results.html?poll_id=412).

Cast your vote at the top right of this page (http://www.aikiweb.com).

Don
02-03-2008, 07:43 PM
Name one that can't be explained by physical mechanisms.

SeiserL
02-04-2008, 06:44 AM
While I wouldn't say "totally explained", physics is the study of mechanics and energy, so it would be a good operational start.

mriehle
02-04-2008, 12:59 PM
While I don't believe there is any magic, I do believe there are things that happen which are not explained by physics.

The best example is a "double nikkyo" thing that I learned early on. If the attacker lets go, the technique will not work. But I know of several instances of people actually using the technique and the attacker doesn't let go. Ever.

So I believe there's a bit of psychology, sort of, in the techniques.

Don_Modesto
02-04-2008, 03:48 PM
So I believe there's a bit of psychology, sort of, in the techniques.ATEMI which doesn't strike it's target won't knock over a salt shaker.

There's eye-contact, eye-flicks, breath, timing...lots that physics doesn't begin to discuss. Not that I intend to get all foo-foo on yo' ass, just that they're not physics' thing.

Nafis Zahir
02-04-2008, 03:55 PM
My answer was no. Some things cannot be explained in words or phrases, but only through constant experience. If the techniques could be explained in words, most people would pick it up much sooner than they do.

mriehle
02-04-2008, 05:08 PM
ATEMI which doesn't strike it's target won't knock over a salt shaker.

There's eye-contact, eye-flicks, breath, timing...lots that physics doesn't begin to discuss.

Yes. Exactly.

Not that I intend to get all foo-foo on yo' ass, just that they're not physics' thing.

Well, thank goodness for that. My world view wouldn't be able to handle it.:D

happysod
02-05-2008, 05:12 AM
There's eye-contact, eye-flicks, breath, timing...lots that physics doesn't begin to discuss. Not that I intend to get all foo-foo on yo' ass, just that they're not physics' thing Not quite true, you could still use physics to describe the movements of the uke under these conditions, just not to accurately describe the cause of the movement unless you go very outre and make analogies between viscosity and intention etc. etc.

Basically, if there's a measurable effect and you don't mind too much what you use as your units of measurement, yes you probably could develop an equation to cover breath, certainly timing et al.

Yours pedantically...

Demetrio Cereijo
02-05-2008, 07:08 AM
Well, there is a psychological component in aikido techniques, however, psychology can be seen as electric impulses and chemistry.

This leads to physics.

mriehle
02-05-2008, 12:41 PM
psychology can be seen as electric impulses and chemistry.

How would you like to be a hair right now? Huh? Why are you picking on these poor, defenseless hairs. Splitting them all over the place. It's not nice and it makes a mess.:rolleyes:

And, in any case, now you're getting into some serious navel-gazing philosophy. Bordering on religion, even. Best to just walk away.:crazy: :eek:

Demetrio Cereijo
02-05-2008, 03:55 PM
I never assume something is defenseless, even hairs. That would be disrespectful.
:)

happysod
02-06-2008, 03:40 AM
So, are we talking straight hairs or bendy ones? The angles involved in the splitting would vary considerably. Then we'd have to consider whether we had the moral right to impose the splitting in the first place or whether the hair truely wanted to split - and what of the folical it's left behind?

mriehle
02-07-2008, 05:57 PM
I never assume something is defenseless, even hairs. That would be disrespectful.
:)

Especially the ones practicing Tie One Ponytail.

It's all in fun until someone loses an eye.

Amir Krause
02-08-2008, 07:42 AM
While I believe the core of any explenaiton would be phisics. It would have to include quite a bit of phisiology. And a small amount of psychology (people not letting go, or trying to resist in specific ways)

Amir