PDA

View Full Version : Morotetori or ??


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


ChristianBoddum
01-28-2008, 05:38 AM
Hi !

What would you call this grab; one hand grabs elbow as katatori
and the other grabs the same arm at the wrist as katatetori,
ukes arm is in vertical position as seen in the warm ups of
the old Tohei - visual textbook Aikido film ??

Chr.B.

mathewjgano
01-28-2008, 06:25 AM
"Morotetori
From AikiWiki - AikiWeb Aikido Information
Jump to:navigation, search
[edit] Morote-tori
Two hands holding one hand.

Also called ryote-mochi or "katatedori ryotemochi" (grabbing one hand by holding with two hands).

This is done with both hands of the uke grabbing between the wrist and the elbow of the nage with the thumbs pointing in opposite directions and advancing the same foot that the hand that is near the elbow, similar (some sensei say that is the same) to grabbing a bokken.

In kotai, usually aihanmi, nage offers one hand high, and uke grabs it with one hand near the wrist, and lowers it at the same time that changes hanmi to gyaku, and grabs with the other hand below the elbow. Nage must maintain his/her arm with muscular tone, so the uke can not make the joint lock."

odudog
01-28-2008, 09:48 AM
This is morotetori. All that is required is that my two hands will grab one of your arms. Wrists, hands, or forearms, it don't matter. All the other stuff that Matthew included is not required and has nothing to do with the word. Now, all that hand and foot movement maybe required in Matthew's dojo as part of their reishiki, but again, it has nothing to do with the definition of the word.

gdandscompserv
01-28-2008, 10:08 AM
I like this version of morotedori the best:
http://www.stenudd.com/aikido/aikido-attacks-ushiro.htm#morote

mathewjgano
01-28-2008, 11:32 AM
This is morotetori. All that is required is that my two hands will grab one of your arms. Wrists, hands, or forearms, it don't matter. All the other stuff that Matthew included is not required and has nothing to do with the word. Now, all that hand and foot movement maybe required in Matthew's dojo as part of their reishiki, but again, it has nothing to do with the definition of the word.

I simply copied and pasted the Aikiwiki description, which just says it's "two hands holding one hand" and then it gives a (not necessarily "the") description of the process; it's not particular to my dojo, though it certainly fits the description of what I typically see there. Perhaps you should edit the entry?

edshockley
01-29-2008, 08:23 AM
It is useful, once we are comfortable with a technique, to explore responding to each variation of the grab. It is often disconcerting to watch an advanced student freeze simply because someone places their hand in a slightly altered position. We know that in applied circumstances there is no prescribed hand placement. Many dojo have "open mat" classes for this reason so that students can explore and refine technique without disrupting a structured class.

Rupert Atkinson
01-30-2008, 02:12 AM
morote-dori

Notice the 'd'

ChristianBoddum
01-30-2008, 02:58 AM
I know know about the tori becomes dori by placement in a word,
but it doesn't spell that way in our dojos curriculum (?).
It not relevant to my initial question.
The grab I'm referring to is at the end of the warm-ups and continues into Ikkyo omote, both hands grab from overhand(?) position.
Please bear with me, english is not my native tongue, neither is japanese !

Josh Reyer
01-30-2008, 04:10 AM
morote-dori

Notice the 'd'

Both "morote-tori" and "morote-dori" are used in Japan, though morote-dori is a bit easier to say and probably more common.

Dominic Toupin
01-30-2008, 06:22 AM
Called Ryote Ippo Dori in Yoseikan Aikido...

Ron Tisdale
01-30-2008, 06:52 AM
ryo katate mochi -- two hands grasping one, Yoshinkan parlance...as in ryo katate mochi shihonage ichi and ni.

B,
R