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Eddie Heinzelman
12-21-2007, 08:04 PM
About 9 months ago, I developed pneumonia. During this time, I apparently went back to working out sooner than I probably should have because I apparently have developed a form of asthma called EIB (exercise induced bronchiospasm). It especially hits me during randori.

So after several more months of working out 4 days a week, and still having problems, Sensei suggested to take up jogging to build up my stamina, but I guess my question to this group is along with running, and working out (which so far doesn't seem to be the full answer), are there any breathing exercises that I can do?

I want to overcome this hurdle and continue to effectively pursue aikido.

Thanks all.

cguzik
12-21-2007, 08:47 PM
If you can, find a yoga class that focuses on pranayama.

Also, reference this thread:

Deep Breathing and Its Meaning (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=10809)

Bronson
12-21-2007, 09:49 PM
Is this something that may go away if you give yourself enough time to heal? If so I'd think it would be worth it in the long run to do so.

Bronson

Janet Rosen
12-21-2007, 10:34 PM
There is some very good info here
http://www.aafp.org/afp/20030215/769.html
and
http://www.theacc.com/sports/c-swim/spec-rel/010505aab.html

roadster
12-22-2007, 01:32 AM
I had issed a question of breathing exercises on this forum. I received a lot of great responses.

http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12742&

Keith Larman
12-22-2007, 08:30 AM
If you have exercise induced asthma you really should talk with a doctor about it as well. A few years ago I fought off a very weird virus over a long term that ended me with pneumonia and a partially collapsed lung. "Getting better" from something like that really takes a long time. You *feel* better often well before your lungs are working correctly. It takes time.

I tried all sorts of breathing exercises, yoga, etc. But in the end the reality was that a quick puff of an asthma inhaler my doctor gave me before I went onto the mat made all the difference in the world.

But in the end you simply need to let your body heal. It is no different than injuring a joint or ligament (well, it is different, but the same long term idea). You need to heal.

Amir Krause
12-22-2007, 10:02 AM
If you have exercise induced asthma you really should talk with a doctor about it as well. A few years ago I fought off a very weird virus over a long term that ended me with pneumonia and a partially collapsed lung. "Getting better" from something like that really takes a long time. You *feel* better often well before your lungs are working correctly. It takes time.

I tried all sorts of breathing exercises, yoga, etc. But in the end the reality was that a quick puff of an asthma inhaler my doctor gave me before I went onto the mat made all the difference in the world.

But in the end you simply need to let your body heal. It is no different than injuring a joint or ligament (well, it is different, but the same long term idea). You need to heal.

I also suggest talking to a doctor first, and to your teacher only after. I had some other illness related to breathing in my teens, and my lungs and aerobics have never fully recuperated since. At certain periods, I have to take an inhaler proior to practicing.

I was told more the once that as far as the lungs and astma are concered, braving through only creates permanent damage.

So, I suggest to consult with relevant specialist doctors. Both those regarding the breath system (only know their name in hebrew) and a sports doctor.

Get well

Amir

Michael Douglas
12-23-2007, 01:57 AM
... "Getting better" from something like that really takes a long time. You *feel* better often well before your lungs are working correctly. It takes time.
Too right, I'll second that. LONG time.
But in the end the reality was that a quick puff of an asthma inhaler my doctor gave me before I went onto the mat made all the difference in the world.
Always a good move. I train with two guys who sometimes use inhalers. They only ever get breath problems at training when they haven't had a puff before the session.

Avery Jenkins
12-23-2007, 06:00 AM
Treated often with Chinese herbs and acupuncture. Find a local DC certified in acupuncture for an exam.

Eddie Heinzelman
12-23-2007, 08:55 PM
I knew I could count on y'all for some great advice. Thank you.

Bronson - I don't know if it is something that will go away or not. I never had issues ever before this and the doctor says there's no way to really know.

Keith, Michael, Amir - Thank you. I have seen my regular doctor, and currently take a nightly Sigulair pill and have an inhaler to use as needed. The Singulair alone has not been enough, and I have found that if I use the inhaler before class, it does seem to help but only to some degree.

I am taking a break from the dojo as well, so maybe light solo practice (bokken, jo, etc.) will keep me going and I will try some breathing exercises and meditation as well.

Thank again for your thoughts.

Amir Krause
12-24-2007, 12:21 AM
Take care

I suggest you also talk to a sports specialist doctor, they are often the most knowledgable in such cases, in which you are practicly healthy from the common medicine point of view.

As I previously wrote. Some friend doctors have warrned me about braving through Astma. Since, at simplton terms: unlike muscles, the lungs do not recuperate rather just form a scarred tissue. I guess a doc would be able to give a better explenation. So, take care and give it the time required.

Amir

Aiki Teacher
12-25-2007, 03:01 PM
About 9 months ago, I developed pneumonia. During this time, I apparently went back to working out sooner than I probably should have because I apparently have developed a form of asthma called EIB (exercise induced bronchiospasm). It especially hits me during randori.

So after several more months of working out 4 days a week, and still having problems, Sensei suggested to take up jogging to build up my stamina, but I guess my question to this group is along with running, and working out (which so far doesn't seem to be the full answer), are there any breathing exercises that I can do?

I want to overcome this hurdle and continue to effectively pursue aikido.

Thanks all.

I have bouts with athletics induced asthma. I also run. I generally use my inhaler before I run or work out. Although, not all the time. If the allergens are bad then I have to use it more often. Some olympic long distance runners have had athletics induced asthma. Rosa Mota who was an Olympic runner was asthmatic. Start back slow, If you get winded, slow down and catch your breath. Like I said, mine has gotten better with time and yes the running will help.
I have also taken bomilane. It is some sort of extract from pinnapples.

Keith Larman
12-26-2007, 05:54 PM
All I can tell you is that in my experience you simply have to give it the time to heal. Overdoing it and further stressing damaged lungs is just not a good idea. If you've got an issue, take the time.

FWIW I found Singulair to be virtually worthless. And when I was having more problems the inhaler before class didn't always keep me from wheezing. At that point you just have to bow out, sit down, and gather your breath and try to relax. If you want to do breathing exercises to get it under control, there, that's the time to do it. But quit exerting until you've got it back under control. You can't "tough it out" in my experience. And the more you try to the longer it will take to get things back.

My problem stems from having a series of severe infections in my youth. Then when I got sick a few years ago, well, I thought I was getting better but in reality I was just in a holding pattern if not getting worse. After enough prodding from my wife I found I was walking around with pneumonia and one lung was partially "stuck" together. I was forced to take it easy, use the inhalers, and basically give it time to get better. And it took a *long* time to do that.

You cannot live without breathing to state the obvious. This is not something to mess with. Some time off now will mean vastly better practice later on when you can actually get some oxygen into your system.

The thing that shocked me was when I started finally getting better how much more energy I had and how much better I did on the mat. The problem is insidious and sneaks up on you. You don't realize why you "don't have legs". But the reality is that you just don't have quite enough air to keep things going at a higher level. You're always tired, you're always dragging your butt around, you crap out early...

My sermon for the day... ;)

lbb
12-28-2007, 07:16 AM
I'm always a fan of the "shotgun approach" to health problems: consider several approaches that support each other, don't count on a single bullet to do the job. Medications and treatments (from both western and complementary medicine), diet, exercise, sleep patterns, environment, other habits -- all go into making a healthy body, or making it possible to heal. If they work together, they often have a multiplying effect, but if they're not all taken into consideration, they can undermine each other. I have never had problems with breathing or exercise-induced asthma, but I have had experience with the body's tendency to heal itself if given time and resources.

So, here's my recipe for healing: look around for answers. Consider everything, but also question everything -- don't just do something, ask yourself why it seems likely to help. Educate yourself. Be patient. Observe the state of your body. Accept the possibility of a less-than-ideal outcome, but never accept it as an inevitability. Maintain hope every day.

Bronson
12-28-2007, 09:48 PM
What you really need is Vitameatavegamin!! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzgVvAy-6ms&feature=related) :D

Bronson