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Walter Martindale
10-24-2007, 09:05 PM
Hi all,
I know that the emphasis here is on discussion of Aikido and all, and not an English language school, but....
In a number of threads, and from a number of persons:
Sparing (to represent two people testing their technique in a training/competitive way) is a miss-speling -oops- mis-spelling of the word - at least that's what I'm deriving from the context.... I wouldn't be raising this except it seems to come from English speakers..

sparing: 1. Frugal, showing careful restraint in the use of resources; 2. Scanty, limited or restricted in quantity; 3. merciful, inclined to be lenient or merciful (Encarta Dictionary)

Sparring – from spar, (intransitive verb) 1. engage in boxing; Boxing to box, especially to fake a blow in order to draw an opponent or create an opening;. 2. use light blows, Boxing to engage in a practice or exhibition bout of boxing or martial arts using light blows. (again, Encarta dictionary)

In the context that sparing is being used, I don't really suspect that either party is being merciful, but if they were sparring, I'd suspect that they were training in martial arts...
Sorry..
W

aikidoc
10-24-2007, 09:37 PM
Your point is well taken but sometimes keys stick or sometimes I think people are just in a hurry and don't check their spelling.

dps
10-25-2007, 02:54 AM
Or mbyae the sepll cchek is not wroknig rghit.

David

Walter Martindale
10-25-2007, 03:37 AM
Or mbyae the sepll cchek is not wroknig rghit.

David

Good one, but "sparing" is a word that is spelled correctly, and "sparring" is also a word that is spelled correctly - the spell checkers would pass both words - they're different words - not even homonyms.

Hashi and hashi, depending on where you place stress in Japanese, are "bridge" and "chopsticks" respectively, are represented by different Kanji, but for me, they sound alike - although I don't think I'd try to cross a river on chopsticks, or eat sashimi with a bridge.... so the context helps me separate them. I still don't know which is which in isolation. "Sparing" and "sparring" are pronounced differently, spelled differently, and, surprise-surprise, have different meanings. They are not homonyms like bear (carry that weight), bear (furry animal with BIG claws), bare (exposed, naked), or great (powerful, wonderful), grate (a metal screen), grate (scrape bits off)
W