PDA

View Full Version : FMA and aikido - bad mix when new?


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


bob_stra
10-14-2007, 10:52 AM
So

An opportunity has presented itself to me and I'm wondering whether to pursue it, or whether it will lead to ruin. I'm soliciting opinions...

I have to option of training in some Yoseikan aikido / aikibudo...a style which I studied briefly several years ago. I have to admit I enjoyed it. As a judoka primarily, I like being exposed to wider set of 'opportunities to throw'. Plus, it's never bad to sharpen ukemi.

I currently study Balintawak Kali / Amok. As far as I can tell, it seems to be less circular than most FMA, preferring to fight 'in close'. Sometimes my judo works very well with it...and sometimes it ends up with a rubber shiv in my ribs or a stick upside my head.

FWIW I think the following clips are fairly representative of the mechanics -

http://youtube.com/watch?v=zWmzTySAnoc

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Om0U6Cr8Y18

(yes - those are random feeds in the first. I know - crazy hand speed. Mine's not anything like that :)

The stepping, the body movement, power generation etc feel quite different to what I recall from Aikido.

Just wondering to those that have experience in both: does studying both concurrently hinder you in learning - esp when a beginner in both? What's been your experience?

PS: FWIW - I have about 6-8months aikido under belt, 6-7 years judo (currently practicing), FMA (about 6 months)...and a bunch of other stuff over the last 15yrs. So I'm not 'first day' new...but still...new :)

Experiences?

SeiserL
10-14-2007, 12:19 PM
IMHO, being a beginner in 2 systems is too much.

villrg0a
10-15-2007, 03:07 AM
I second Lynn. Try to finish either one first, training them both at the same time will take you nowhere.

DonMagee
10-15-2007, 05:55 AM
I second Lynn. Try to finish either one first, training them both at the same time will take you nowhere.

How do you finish a martial art?

I agree most people could not learn 2 new arts at the same time. But it depends on your mindset and the person. I say if you honestly want to try it, then go for it. Just be careful to keep the arts separate while you learn the basics.

Amir Krause
10-15-2007, 07:13 AM
Depends on you

Would you be able to learn them as totally distinct items?
Are you coordinate enough no to confuse and come to each lesson with carry overs from the other art?

I can not.
I know some people who can.

Just like some people have difficulty learning a single foriegn language and others can learn several and even start them in parallel.
Just like some people can face more complicated math then othes.

Being able to learn multiple arts as a beginner is a gift. Some people have it, many others do not.
Unless you are one of the gifted ones, you should not.

Amir

gregg block
10-15-2007, 09:05 AM
Build strong foundation in one art before branching out. Without a good foundation things tend to collapse when trouble comes.

lbb
10-15-2007, 10:17 AM
I wouldn't do it. Think of the hours in the day. My usual metric is that to make progress in a style, I want to train three or more times a week. With two styles, that's six days a week. Do you even have that many classes available to you? Do you know what it's like to live with only one free evening a week? Will your other obligations allow for it?

villrg0a
10-15-2007, 11:44 AM
How do you finish a martial art?

I agree most people could not learn 2 new arts at the same time. But it depends on your mindset and the person. I say if you honestly want to try it, then go for it. Just be careful to keep the arts separate while you learn the basics.

I meant finish learning the basics, at least on the black belt level...

SeiserL
10-15-2007, 11:47 AM
How do you finish a martial art?
You finish being a beginner and you begin really learning.

Sequentially, get a base in one first.

CNYMike
10-15-2007, 11:42 PM
Just wondering to those that have experience in both: does studying both concurrently hinder you in learning - esp when a beginner in both? What's been your experience?

Unfortunately, I'd been doing Inosanto Kali for fie or six years when I resumed doing Aikido, so not quite a "beginner" in both. But I didn't find it a hindrance. I tend to see FMA as covering a lot of ground and many ranges of combat, when you consider both the armed and empty hand sections, whereas Aikido is more specialized on certain areas. You may see similar things in FMA, but Aikido spends more time on them.

Granted, that's my impression based on doing Inosanto Kail. I've had a taste of Balintawak once in a great while, but I don't know how much it covers with weapons and the empty hand. But if it's anything like what I've been doing, then I see more potential for overlap than confict provided you know what to look for.

As to whether you should do both at the same time while new, I first did Aikido when I'd been at karate for a year and a half; I didn't find any major problems. If you have the time, the money, and your instructors don't freak at you training with someone else, and you really want to do it, go for it!