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nekobaka
09-30-2007, 01:35 AM
Today Doshu came to Osaka. I decided not to practice, just because there were so many people (300?) and it would be so crazy. I had forgotten you can get a stamp in your yudansha passport at these seminars, and so I was a little disappointed, I don't have any stamps yet.

He focused on kokyuroku, irimi, and taisabaki. He emphasized the connection we should make with uke, and uke with tori. He especially emphasised that we should treat everyone with respect, apply techniques relative to our uke's ability, and do unto others and you would have done unto you.

A new member to my dojo was surprised that he didn't have more charisma. My take on it is that he wants to present himself as a normal person, he's very humble, and he wants to set that kind of example. Of course that is only my take on it.

It's hard to watch though, it really makes you want to practice. Good thing I only have to wait until tomorrow.:D

Peter Goldsbury
09-30-2007, 05:54 AM
Today Doshu came to Osaka. I decided not to practice, just because there were so many people (300?) and it would be so crazy. I had forgotten you can get a stamp in your yudansha passport at these seminars, and so I was a little disappointed, I don't have any stamps yet.

He focused on kokyuroku, irimi, and taisabaki. He emphasized the connection we should make with uke, and uke with tori. He especially emphasised that we should treat everyone with respect, apply techniques relative to our uke's ability, and do unto others and you would have done unto you.

A new member to my dojo was surprised that he didn't have more charisma. My take on it is that he wants to present himself as a normal person, he's very humble, and he wants to set that kind of example. Of course that is only my take on it.

It's hard to watch though, it really makes you want to practice. Good thing I only have to wait until tomorrow.:D

Were you actually able to see the finer points of what Doshu was doing? One possibility would have been to practise and to get as close to Doshu as possible, especially when he was demonstrating.

Actually, I have very negative feelings about the value of huge seminars, where no one can see what is going on and so the possibility of actual transmission of any knowledge obtainable is virtually zero. These seminars are more like church services in a cathedral, or religious rallies where the Pope appears and does what popes usually do. They are of value more for reaffirming one's faith in aikido than for adding to one's technical knowledge of the art.

Best wishes,

PAG

tedehara
09-30-2007, 01:18 PM
...They are of value more for reaffirming one's faith in aikido than for adding to one's technical knowledge of the art.

Best wishes,

PAGHuh? :confused:

Could you explain what you mean by ...reaffirming one's faith in aikido...?

mathewjgano
09-30-2007, 01:34 PM
Actually, I have very negative feelings about the value of huge seminars, where no one can see what is going on and so the possibility of actual transmission of any knowledge obtainable is virtually zero. These seminars are more like church services in a cathedral, or religious rallies where the Pope appears and does what popes usually do. They are of value more for reaffirming one's faith in aikido than for adding to one's technical knowledge of the art.

I think I see what you mean about them being more of a rally...just yesterday at my dojo we had a grand total of 4 people training, but the level of focus and interaction with sensei was so much more potent. It also didn't hurt that 2 of the 4 students were also the two highest ranked in the dojo, but getting that kind of concentrated focus was quite amazing compared to days when we have more students around. Not that those days aren't extreamly useful too, but relatively speaking, yesterday was far more insightful than usual...and I had a much more difficult time getting the waza correct enough to keep from being overwhealmed.

gdandscompserv
09-30-2007, 02:18 PM
Doshu came to Okinawa Aikikai to administer the test for my shodan. He was not Doshu at that time as his father was still alive. They called him WakaSensei back then. I was not able to take ukemi for him but the event was something I will never forget.

Carl Thompson
09-30-2007, 06:25 PM
The Doshu had his regular two-day seminar here in Iwama just a few weeks ago. That was great to watch and we definitely got to see his human side. It was still a busy seminar, but in a small venue so everyone could see and have a go. Just watching gives you ideas but you really need to practise to make them real.

I have a special reason for enjoying mitorigeiko at the moment: I broke my hand in a cycling accident. I've still got another week or so before I lose the cast. In the meantime, it's frustrating, but fascinating to watch how different people interact with each other. It's quite exciting sometimes, particularly when you know the participants. How will X-Sensei cope doing that with Y-Sensei?

I could say more, but that's about all I can write one handed for now… ;)

Regards
Carl

nekobaka
10-01-2007, 07:38 AM
I could see quite well, so it was ok that I couldn't practice.
He didn't practice with anyone though. I was disappointed. My sensei always walks around and practices with people at seminars, so I thought that was standard. I would like to know his reasons.

Today we were talking about it at practice. His style is kind of classic textbook aikido. however usually a sensei developes their own style. I honestly prefer my sensei's style, but it's good to see. Doshu makes everything look like he's just walking down the street, saying hello, and bang, irimi nage.

Josh Reyer
10-01-2007, 09:35 AM
Today we were talking about it at practice. His style is kind of classic textbook aikido. however usually a sensei developes their own style. I honestly prefer my sensei's style, but it's good to see. Doshu makes everything look like he's just walking down the street, saying hello, and bang, irimi nage.

Consider the idea that rather than Doshu's style being classic textbook aikido, that perhaps classic textbook aikido is Doshu's style. :)

David Humm
10-01-2007, 11:33 AM
Consider the idea that rather than Doshu's style being classic textbook aikido, that perhaps classic textbook aikido is Doshu's style. :)Personally I don't like to think of anyone's aikido (including Doshu) as being "text book".

Aikido being a gendai is open to development and individual interpretation of application which means from one generation to another you are going to see differences (sometimes extreme) from one to another. Look at what is taught at the aikikai today against what was taught 50 years ago.

If aikido was koryu then I could see merit in a "text book" statement; look how many text books we have on aikido today from so many different and very skilled aikidoka.

IMHO its difficult to add labels to gendai budo because, by its very nature, it can be done differently thus opinions on what constitute, in this case "text book" will vary considerably.

batemanb
10-02-2007, 12:52 AM
I could see quite well, so it was ok that I couldn't practice.
He didn't practice with anyone though. I was disappointed. My sensei always walks around and practices with people at seminars, so I thought that was standard. I would like to know his reasons.

Today we were talking about it at practice. His style is kind of classic textbook aikido. however usually a sensei developes their own style. I honestly prefer my sensei's style, but it's good to see. Doshu makes everything look like he's just walking down the street, saying hello, and bang, irimi nage.

I was told by my Sensei in Japan many years ago that Doshu was effectively restricted to what he could/would/ should do in public. As Doshu, he was tasked with maintaining the line, therefore his Aikido had to be "classic text book".

Personally I happen to like very much the aikido that Doshu does, whenever I've been in his class, it's clear and crisp, and very effective.

I was at special seminar with Doshu one Sunday in Tokyo back in 2002 at the Tokyo Budokan. Whilst practicing Irirminage, my partner turned round and said "ahh Doshu", next instance my partner was in seiza and I was uke for Doshu, I treasure the experience :) .