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Shane O
09-26-2007, 06:15 AM
I am very interested in aikido. I've watched many videos on it and it amazes me, just how easily you can take down someone. I am going to start aikido soon but I want to learn as much as I can about it before I do. Tell me about it. What do you learn when you start, how long does it take before you can use it in a fight? Is it effective in a fight? Is it really effective against multiple attackers? Is it hard to learn? Is it worth being learnt? I just started muay thai aswell recently. Would muay thai and aikido be a good combo?

Thanks guys, if you could help me out and answer some of my questions, I would appreciate it.

Mattias Bengtsson
09-26-2007, 07:19 AM
mmm.

Well, to begin with, Muay Thai and Aikido are two entirely different martial arts.
MT will teach you how to take someone down hard by hurting them until they can't fight you any more, while Aikido have the intention of taking someone down, without hurting them. (of course, every technique can be used to bring someone down without hurting anyone can just as easily be used to injure them)
So what we have here are two directly opposed philosophies.

to defeat someone without hurting them are much much harder than kick and punch someone and so will take a long long time before one can say it can be used for self-defence. Several years in fact, while MT probably can be used just after a few months.

In Aikido, just learning how to fall after being thrown takes a couple of months, and that's what you'll be doing in training for the first months.

If its worth it? definitely, myself ive made a lot of friends, has had great fun, getting exercise amd improved my self confidence.
But can I take care of myself in a fight yet? (after 1 year) ... maybe..
I wouldn't start a fight to beat people up exactly, but i'm more confident i would be able to take care of myself better than one year ago at least, and that's good enough for me..

And I would say it certainly doesn't hurt against multiple attackers. Most martial arts only focus on one opponent, and in a ring, with rules. At least Aikido recognizes that there are no rules, and a person attacking you might not come alone.
But those same lessons to increase ones awareness of ones surroundings could as easily be used with MT or any other martial art.

And there ya go, i'd say that while Aikido would certainly be used for self-defence, if it was my intention of learning strictly self-defence, I'd go to another martial art..

Angela Dunn
09-26-2007, 07:20 AM
Wow okay lets see...

What do you learn when you start,
I think this will vary between styles and dojos but as a red belt I learn't How to safely do a backward role, forward role, Ikkyo (a type of pin) from ai hammai Kata Tori (basic take down, spelt completly wrong I suspect so sorry about that) and *Struggles to remember now* erm tai sabaki and oh yeah Ai Hammai Kata Tori (a grasp) Irimi nage (a type of throw.) and irimi nage from shomen uchi (a type of strike) That was for the begainers program and its well worth learning how to do these well as these form the basis for a lot of the higher grade stuff.

how long does it take before you can use it in a fight?
I try not to get into fights as well totally not a fighter. Someone else will have to answer that for you however I think that would depend on how quick you learn stuff properly with a sensei and not just from videos.

Is it effective in a fight?
Theres debates on this elsewhere in this forumn but as a way from defending youself in a fight then I would say yes. As a way of fighting possibly not.

Is it really effective against multiple attackers?
Once you move up the ranks you will learn stuff with multipal attackers, in my organisation thats black belt stuff, randori woith multipal attackers its called and just watching it I would say Oh Yes!

Is it hard to learn?
Again I think that depends on a couple of factors , how co-ordinated you are , how often you can get to class, again how easy you pick up new skills and how well your Sensei's teaching style and your way of learning gels . I can pick up some stuff pretty easily and other moves I can find really confusing. I have poor co-ordination and my ballance is not so good so I can find learning moves a bit frustrating but do get the hang of it eventually.

Is it worth being learnt?
Definatly, but it works for me, I find it fun and the people I train with are a good bunch. I would say thoughAikido does not suite everyone but give it a month or two before you decide if it is worth it for you.

Guybrush Wilkinson
09-26-2007, 07:44 AM
When I enrolled an aikido class I was given a small booklet that answers some of your questions. If you are looking for something that will make you a good fighter in a short time span you should look for something else. Aikido will be useful on the street only when you master it and that will take years. I was also told that aikido is not a self-defence art either.

SeiserL
09-26-2007, 07:52 AM
If you are "very interested" then don't ask us to describe it for you. Sign up, show up, suit up, (its often said, shut up), and train. The best answers to most questions are found on the mat over time. Welcome.

Shane O
09-26-2007, 08:02 AM
I know MT and aikido are totally different. Is aikido good for self defence? Not to use to fight someone, I mean if your attacked. I don't want to learn it to fight, I want to learn it for self defence. Also I am starting aikido soon. Not next week, week after :D I'm excited and nervous at the same time.

aiki-kid
09-26-2007, 08:30 AM
I know MT and aikido are totally different. Is aikido good for self defence? Not to use to fight someone, I mean if your attacked. I don't want to learn it to fight, I want to learn it for self defence. Also I am starting aikido soon. Not next week, week after :D I'm excited and nervous at the same time.

If it's selfdefence you seek i'd look on some other sports.... perhaps 100 meters ;)

don't get me wrong though, aikido can be used as selfdefence but it'll take a lot of time and dedication to get there. So my advice is not to focus on the self defence part insted focus on having fun and make a lot of new friends :)

RBPierce
09-26-2007, 09:00 AM
aikido can be used as selfdefence but it'll take a lot of time and dedication to get there. So my advice is not to focus on the self defence part insted focus on having fun and make a lot of new friends :)

But to answer your question- yes, most definately.

Mark Freeman
09-26-2007, 10:15 AM
I am going to start aikido soon but I want to learn as much as I can about it before I do. Tell me about it.

You will learn little of any practical value before you start to practice.

You will learn little of any practical value once you do start to practice.

If you keep practising, the value of aikido will become apparent to you.

If you practice long enough to completely embody the principles of aikido into your daily life, you can then help others to achieve the same.

Aikido is not about fighting, but it can be useful if you find yourself in a position where there is no other alternative.

Many of us arrive at the door of aikido with a 'fighting mind', learning how to replace this with a mind of 'non-contention' is where all the time and effort comes in. I'm not there yet, but I'm better than I was, which means I'm heading in the right direction;)

regards,

Mark

Nikopol
09-26-2007, 10:39 AM
Aikido and anything is a great combination. But not if you are interested in fighting. Use AIkido to take yourself up, not to take people down.

Be prepared to lose your love of fighting and find something greater, or what you are doing will not be Aikido. Having said that, go for it.

I think you can do it.

philippe willaume
09-26-2007, 12:17 PM
Hello

MT id good way to lean to strike (elbow, knee fist and foot) as well it is good to “tank” it up, ie you will get used to get hit.
So it is good way to practice your atemis which comes handy in aikido.

I personally believe it is a good combo as you put it. As far a moral implication well that is your personal problem.
Personally I do not see any philosophical contradiction between MT and aikido.

Shizentota
09-26-2007, 06:07 PM
Many of us arrive at the door of aikido with a 'fighting mind', learning how to replace this with a mind of 'non-contention'

Mark

It happened the same to me, but I am glad about it, cause now can understand the real principles of the aiki, as they say before, the best way to know about it i to be in it.

When we born we are still connected to our environment, when we get older our body and mind start to harden, aikido help us to recover that connection, to react in a peaceful way
:)

gregg block
09-26-2007, 07:08 PM
It's very difficult to be new to the martial arts and learn two style at once. My advice. Try both; decide which you are more interested in and then dedicate yourself to it. Better to be proficient in one than "so so" in two.

philippe willaume
09-27-2007, 06:12 AM
It happened the same to me, but I am glad about it, cause now can understand the real principles of the aiki, as they say before, the best way to know about it i to be in it.

When we born we are still connected to our environment, when we get older our body and mind start to harden, aikido help us to recover that connection, to react in a peaceful way
:)

well i would propose that one try a few round in MT. Win or losse, you will quickly realise that there is not that much difference in how rotten you feel the 2 concecutive day after the fight.
Taking 10 minutes to get down a 10 step strairs when you are 22, really does wonders to see the value of a peacefull way over fighting.

phil

lbb
09-27-2007, 08:34 AM
I know MT and aikido are totally different. Is aikido good for self defence? Not to use to fight someone, I mean if your attacked. I don't want to learn it to fight, I want to learn it for self defence. Also I am starting aikido soon. Not next week, week after :D I'm excited and nervous at the same time.

You want to learn aikido for self-defense, and you want to know if it's any good? Tell me first, what kind of attacks are you experiencing? How often are you attacked, who's doing the attacking, why are they attacking you, are they unarmed or armed, carrying weapons, what?

I suspect your answer to this will be something like, "Er, well, I haven't ever actually been attacked except for that time in school when that kid got mad when I bumped into him, but I want to know just in case!" That's fine too, but if you're serious about wanting to learn aikido for self-defense, you need to be willing to honestly and realistically assess what the most likely attack would be like -- and also, how likely it is. Too many people go into the martial arts fantasizing about the kind of "self-defense" that almost never happens outside the movies, when in reality they're more likely to get into a "self-defense" situation if they get drunk and go aggro on some stranger in a bar (or whatever).

Finally, you need to ask yourself -- given that your fantasy attack scenario will likely never materialize unless you behave in an exceptionally stupid fashion, and that any threats you're likely to encounter can probably most effectively be dealt with using simple prudence and common sense -- if that's sufficient reason for you to train aikido, or any other martial art. If self-defense is your only driver, I'd say that's not a good enough reason to train. It might be enough reason to get you on the mat, though, after which you might discover other reasons. But don't go into it hoping to be Badass Streetfighter in a month -- you won't get what you're after and the attitude won't be well-received.

gregg block
09-27-2007, 07:02 PM
Mary,
Excellent! Just plain excellent! Cuts to the truth like a razor. I couldnt agree more. well done

Ryan Sanford
09-27-2007, 07:23 PM
Is aikido good for self defense?
A high-ranking instructor whose name escapes me once said something like "Aikido works; your Aikido doesn't."

Aikido gets a lot of flak from other styles about its effectiveness, but I've always thought that was silly. IMO, Aikido will stop being effective when nikkyo stops being painful, and I don't see that happening anytime soon. :freaky:

Oh, and I agree with Gregg, that was very nicely said Mary!

Roman Kremianski
09-27-2007, 11:08 PM
Find a dojo and put in training. If you're wondering when you'll be ready to fight, the answer would have to be never.

Jorge Garcia
09-27-2007, 11:21 PM
If you want to use your art in a fight, definitely go somewhere else. If you want to train, be under strict discipline and gradually become a better person through a lot of effort and hard training, then go with Aikido.

My teacher says that Aikido isn't about fighting, if it was, then our training would be different.
best,
Jorge

Roman Kremianski
09-28-2007, 10:26 PM
gradually become a better person through a lot of effort and hard training, then go with Aikido.

Bear in mind that's not an Aikido-exclusive result.

dalen7
09-29-2007, 03:36 AM
I know MT and aikido are totally different. Is aikido good for self defence? Not to use to fight someone, I mean if your attacked. I don't want to learn it to fight, I want to learn it for self defence. Also I am starting aikido soon. Not next week, week after :D I'm excited and nervous at the same time.

I think MT and Aikido is a fine mix. MT is something that I have been wanting to take for the past 5 months (of which I have spent learning Aikido...not a scheduling conflict, just havent wanted to purchase more stuff at the moment.)

So I have been at it 5 months and can make a couple of comments from a beginners perspective. Some of the moves (well all, actually) are effective if done properly - but it does depend on the circumstance in real life as to if it would work. In real life it would be nice to have a hard art like MT to do a quick beating if needed.

But in my country, it seems like people like to grab you (with all the comments I have seen poking fun, saying "who is gonna grab you"...well in my part of Hungary it seems to be the thing to do when tempers flare...quite interesting indeed.)

If you only practice 2 times a week, it may take awhile to get comfortable with moves, especially when learning different moves at each lesson. (also, I cant speak Hungarian for the life of me, and the people in my class the same with English...so that does make it more challenging.)

But when you get a 'sankyo' or a 'nikkyo' applied, you can see that your wrist and elbow feel like they will never recover - you will see that this does have a 'place' in certain situations requiring defense.

We happen to put emphasis on atemi. (hitting and kicking) as we go into a technique to make sure the person goes down.
Now trust me, without atemi, the person goes down nicely...but remember the guy on the street aint your practice partner...so it can get rough (especially depending on training partner.) There are basically 2 - 3 people I can train with and no I will learn and not get hurt. (I have already sustained a couple of injuries. One was with my elbow with an inexperienced visitor being careless, and another with Nikkyo...done properly, that left my wrist soar for a week or so. And with shomen left my muscles in my arm bruised so I skipped a lesson (only one so far I missed.)

So you will see that Aikido is a mixed bag...it depends on dojo...country, etc.

As one guy mentioned here, go try it out...see if you like it.

Peace

dAlen