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dalen7
09-07-2007, 02:48 PM
I know...dont let the door hit me on the way out. :D

Seriously, as of today I have had 35 lessons (including seminars) in a total of 16 weeks (4 months) - we train twice a week.

It feels almost like yesterday that I first posted here at aiki web (and while I know 4 months is nothing to what some of you have, time has gone by pretty fast.)

I have only missed one lesson (or I would had been at 36), and that was this past Tuesday. (there you go for accurate record keeping and details ;) )
Anyway - I had resigned myself to not continuing with aikido.

It was reading todays thread of aiki boxing at aiki web that motivated me to go again today to try it out for yet another month.

And in the last sentence you can see what my issue is.
It is at this time period that I am now getting comfortable with the terms, the moves (well at least understanding whats happening, etc.) - and its at this time I am realizing that to efficiently be able t execute these moves in a real life situation, I would have to dedicate years (at the rate that Im learning) to be able to fight effectively.

I have in mind to take up the Thai boxing classes that just started up again this past week. (I have wanted to do that in conjunction with aikido anyway...but I have invested in aikido gear, and do not feel ready to fork out more money for gloves, wraps, etc. for a sport that I only want to play with for a month or so - this is a sport that I would feel comfortable doing at home...me and punching bag.)

So - Im kind of at that stage I have heard about, where most people drop out at around 4-6 months. And I can see why.

Also, remember, I have been learning in a place where no one really speaks my language and I cannot speak theres. Everything really is about watching (which can be confusing trying to decipher which move demonstrated is the wrong one and why its wrong to perform it that way.)

All and all, if I were to quit now, I think I have done well - but as mentioned, inspired somewhat from the aiki boxing thread, I may be at it at least for another month. (In reality I like to set short term goals...first was a month, then 3, and I was hoping for 6 and then at a year...well, that would feel like I got a solid feel for the basics of the sport - whether I carried on or not.

Peace

dAlen

Aikibu
09-07-2007, 03:06 PM
Memorize and incorporate this Mantra into your life

"One Practice at a Time"

Good luck with your journey. :)

William Hazen

mathewjgano
09-07-2007, 03:12 PM
dalen,
I can understand some of what you're feeling. It can be quite hard when there isn't that added sense of community (hard to have with little communication). I think a big reason so many people stick with it is the social aspect, particularly in the beginning. Ultimately of course you have to determine what feels best for you and in my own experience, taking some time off can prove useful for gaining perspective. On the other hand, people tend to forget about that which they no longer actively particpate in. The more time I spent off the mat, the less I felt compelled to go, despite always talking like I was about to go back.
I always want to suggest people practice Aikido and make it a life-long thing, but circumstance and taste don't necessarily make that the best option for everyone. It's hard to offer any truly honest advice because I don't know why you're training or how you're training or anything else about you, but I would suggest you think about what it is you want to train for and how it is you're meeting that training. One nice thing about Aikido (in my opinion) is that much, if not all, of it's concepts are quite universal and can be applied to other practice. Four months does seem a short time to me, particularly if you feel you're just now reaching a level of familiarity (an important stage, in my limited opinion) but that's just me placing my subjective understanding to your situation; you have a better vantage than I do.
It's kind of funny, but I was just writing about how my time at another dojo really envigorated my overall training. Sometimes a change in scene can be just the thing to give one a fresh perspective.
Gambatte!
Matt

Conrad Gus
09-07-2007, 03:13 PM
Don't quit. Really.

If you are looking to become a good fighter in a short period of time, aikido is not the art for you.

If you want personal transformation, keep going for a long, long time. It's an awesome journey, and we have evidence (some master teachers) that the destination, such is there is one, is far more profound and encompassing than just effective self-defense. You won't find the same thing so easily elsewhere.

mathewjgano
09-07-2007, 03:20 PM
Don't quit. Really.

If you are looking to become a good fighter in a short period of time, aikido is not the art for you.

If you want personal transformation, keep going for a long, long time. It's an awesome journey, and we have evidence (some master teachers) that the destination, such is there is one, is far more profound and encompassing than just effective self-defense. You won't find the same thing so easily elsewhere.

I'm inclined to agree, but don't you find it hard to say for sure without knowing the particulars of dalen's situation? I don't want to suggest dalen quit, but I don't think we're in a position to give definitive suggestions...particularly without knowing anything more about the situation.
A life-time of sincere, creative, and dynamic training is all i can comfortably suggest to anyone...but I guess that's why that was YOUR post and not mine, lol! :o
Cheers!

dalen7
09-07-2007, 04:16 PM
First, William you are right...
"One practice at a time" is a good mantra.

Its something Im trying to apply to everyday life actually.
(that is, to become more aware of what it is Im doing in the present moment, instead of always rushing through life - trying to get to the next thing, etc. and letting life itself pass me by.)

So on a spiritual and actually practical side of things - when I look at it from this aspect, the question really is kind of moot.

And Conrad, your right...if I want to be a fighter right away aikido is not the sport...again depending on type of fight. (against some brute trying to grab you, etc. there is a nice advantage even now...but in a brawl, well we know the answer.)

And Matthew, your right...it is good to take time off to get some perspective. Im glad I did not go this past Tues. - the only time I took off since I started training -
As for my reasons for training. Its a mixed bag really.

If I may be honest, Im not sure Im even all that clear (or can be clear) as to why I am. I do know that part of the reason is as a kid I always wanted to take a martial art class...The other, probably similar to what I just mentioned, is for an ego boost to know I can kick butt. But as Im older, and seeing the world more clearly (a lot of the disillusionment of childhood waning away...) its really more for the spiritual aspect. - and in truth, that means that I do not even really need to take Aikido if its peace Im seeking.

Part of me knows that Im not rooted in peace yet, and there may be times when I may end up needing to protect myself - and I would wish to do so in a not so violent way. (I shared a story, I believe here how I had an argument with someone...there was yelling, and the next thing I know some judo move is put on me. After a bit of going back and forth Im on the ground, and kicking the guys face, pouncing up and punching him in the nose...long stroy cut extremely short.) Now, the fact is, yes I was attacked...but in this situation, I wish I could have ended it without the result being blood coming out his nose, at the same time I did not know of any other technique to defend myself against him.

On a 'higher' level, had I just walked away and not involved myself in the argument, this would not have happened, more than likely.

So perhaps you see more where Im coming from.
My goal is to be rooted in peace, and I realize Im not there yet.
So, its not all that bad to have a back up...but in the same token fights are serious. It would be in my best interest to learn to walk away from any argument as you cannot guarantee the outcome of a street fight - i.e, someones buddy comes up, etc.

Anyway...that about summarized it.

Peace

dAlen

Ivan Sekularac
09-07-2007, 04:49 PM
Try not to put any pressure on yourself... just come to Dojo, relax and train at your own pace... remember, like many good things, Aikido is complex and it does take time for ideas to sink in and for your body to get use to all the changes... progress will come, it just takes time... also if you are tired or fed up with it, give yourself week or two to relax and then come back... never force it... if you are tired or overwhelmed, slow down and take it easy... just stay positive.

Conrad Gus
09-07-2007, 04:51 PM
I'm inclined to agree, but don't you find it hard to say for sure without knowing the particulars of dalen's situation? I don't want to suggest dalen quit, but I don't think we're in a position to give definitive suggestions...particularly without knowing anything more about the situation.
A life-time of sincere, creative, and dynamic training is all i can comfortably suggest to anyone...but I guess that's why that was YOUR post and not mine, lol! :o
Cheers!

I agree with you completely. If the situation doesn't match your personal needs, then it can be a waste of effort.

ChrisHein
09-07-2007, 04:53 PM
seems like all of your posts are about quitting.

Conrad Gus
09-07-2007, 05:00 PM
On a 'higher' level, had I just walked away and not involved myself in the argument, this would not have happened, more than likely.



Oh yeah, but the trick is to be able to control one's self in such situations. I struggle with this all the time (especially when my kids don't cooperate with me at the end of a long day!). Training internal peace is very effective for keeping us out of trouble in the first place, as you have said.

The beauty of aikido, in my opinion, is that it addresses conflict at the root level (or 'higher' level, depending how you look at it). Actual fighting techniques are only one expression of the range of aikido applications.

Aikibu
09-07-2007, 05:27 PM
First, William you are right...
"One practice at a time" is a good mantra.

Its something Im trying to apply to everyday life actually.
(that is, to become more aware of what it is Im doing in the present moment, instead of always rushing through life - trying to get to the next thing, etc. and letting life itself pass me by.)

So on a spiritual and actually practical side of things - when I look at it from this aspect, the question really is kind of moot.

And Conrad, your right...if I want to be a fighter right away aikido is not the sport...again depending on type of fight. (against some brute trying to grab you, etc. there is a nice advantage even now...but in a brawl, well we know the answer.)

And Matthew, your right...it is good to take time off to get some perspective. Im glad I did not go this past Tues. - the only time I took off since I started training -
As for my reasons for training. Its a mixed bag really.

If I may be honest, Im not sure Im even all that clear (or can be clear) as to why I am. I do know that part of the reason is as a kid I always wanted to take a martial art class...The other, probably similar to what I just mentioned, is for an ego boost to know I can kick butt. But as Im older, and seeing the world more clearly (a lot of the disillusionment of childhood waning away...) its really more for the spiritual aspect. - and in truth, that means that I do not even really need to take Aikido if its peace Im seeking.

Part of me knows that Im not rooted in peace yet, and there may be times when I may end up needing to protect myself - and I would wish to do so in a not so violent way. (I shared a story, I believe here how I had an argument with someone...there was yelling, and the next thing I know some judo move is put on me. After a bit of going back and forth Im on the ground, and kicking the guys face, pouncing up and punching him in the nose...long stroy cut extremely short.) Now, the fact is, yes I was attacked...but in this situation, I wish I could have ended it without the result being blood coming out his nose, at the same time I did not know of any other technique to defend myself against him.

On a 'higher' level, had I just walked away and not involved myself in the argument, this would not have happened, more than likely.

So perhaps you see more where Im coming from.
My goal is to be rooted in peace, and I realize Im not there yet.
So, its not all that bad to have a back up...but in the same token fights are serious. It would be in my best interest to learn to walk away from any argument as you cannot guarantee the outcome of a street fight - i.e, someones buddy comes up, etc.

Anyway...that about summarized it.

Peace

dAlen

Welcome to EEEEGOOO DOOOOOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Ying and Yang enter...Aikidoka leaves!

:D

William Hazen

By the humble grace of Mad Max my apologies. :)

SeiserL
09-07-2007, 07:34 PM
IMHO, it is your life, your journey, your decision.
I have trained in many different styles and systems of martial arts, in many different dojos, with many different teachers. Find the one that fits for you.
Best wishes on your journey.

mathewjgano
09-07-2007, 08:59 PM
IMHO, it is your life, your journey, your decision.
I have trained in many different styles and systems of martial arts, in many different dojos, with many different teachers. Find the one that fits for you.
Best wishes on your journey.

Lynn,
I always enjoy your posts. I hope some day I'm as concise.
Take care.

Dan Austin
09-07-2007, 09:15 PM
Part of me knows that Im not rooted in peace yet, and there may be times when I may end up needing to protect myself - and I would wish to do so in a not so violent way.

Dalen,

If Aikido is all you have done in martial arts, yes, I think you should quit. If you would like to be a "benevolent warrior", this comes from having real ability and choosing not to use it needlessly, and the base of ability will come from learning solid combative arts and developing experience - which is actually what Ueshiba did before developing Aikido. The finished product, if it is for anyone, is not for beginners. All you will build in Aikido is false confidence, not fighting ability. There is nothing so amusing on this forum as people who talk about not hurting an attacker, as if they of all martial artists have the ability to be so magnanimous. To be kind to one's enemy is to be cruel to oneself, and the world's greatest martial artist does not have the luxury to give himself a handicap against any serious aggressor. When you can fight well already, then Aikido may be worth another look some day. Best of luck.

dps
09-07-2007, 09:43 PM
Also, remember, I have been learning in a place where no one really speaks my language and I cannot speak theres. Everything really is about watching (which can be confusing trying to decipher which move demonstrated is the wrong one and why its wrong to perform it that way.)

Will this change at the Thai boxing classes?

David

Roman Kremianski
09-07-2007, 10:30 PM
If you are looking to become a good fighter in a short period of time, aikido is not the art for you.

No art is the art for you, if you're looking to become a good fighter in a short period of time.

crbateman
09-07-2007, 11:20 PM
I would have to dedicate years (at the rate that Im learning) to be able to fight effectively.This one statement speaks volumes. You began Aikido because you wanted to learn to fight. There are several valid reasons to practice Aikido, but this is not one of them. You are frustrated because it has not given you what you expected of it. Perhaps you would be better gratified by doing something else, but I hope that you will someday see the greater benefits, and return with a different agenda. Best of luck to you.

Janet Rosen
09-08-2007, 12:28 AM
Y'know what? You and aikido, at least aikido at that dojo, might just not "click", and that's OK. No value judgement on either you or the art is implied.
I choose to paint, not to sculpt or be a printmaker. Doesn't really matter "why" and nobody assumes that I look down on sculptors because of it.
Sometimes we are fortunate in life to be able to try things out and see if they are right for us to pursue or not. Sometimes we know immediately "yes, I'm home!" and sometimes it takes a bit of time to realize "uh, no, not for me" (and sometimes we change and have to walk away).

Erick Mead
09-08-2007, 02:05 AM
I am realizing that to efficiently be able t execute these moves in a real life situation, I would have to dedicate years (at the rate that Im learning) to be able to fight effectively. If you want to learn to fight effectively -- join the Marines, Rangers, or SEALS (keeping it ecumenical). If you want to defend yourself (minimally) get a gun and learn its proper use.
So, its not all that bad to have a back up...but in the same token fights are serious. It would be in my best interest to learn to walk away from any argument as you cannot guarantee the outcome of a street fight - i.e, someones buddy comes up, etc. Aikido is properly neither walking away -- nor perpetuating a conflict. It's something else. Fight and you will win -- or lose. Plenty of places to learn to fight -- and win -- and lose. At the end of that long process you may find a glimpse of something. There is a Way to be found in war and conflict --but there are also deep and thorny thickets and deadly pits. Aikido is among the best and most effective arts in seeking that narrow, knife-edged Way (but by no means the only one).

Devote yourself to fighting and if you are very lucky you may stumble over it way down the road. Find yourself in deadly danger with shipmates at your side -- and you may find it sooner -- and then the path of Aikido will become far more clear.

Christopher Gee
09-08-2007, 05:17 AM
the grass is not always so green.

osu

Walter Martindale
09-08-2007, 05:41 AM
Also, remember, I have been learning in a place where no one really speaks my language and I cannot speak theres. Everything really is about watching (which can be confusing trying to decipher which move demonstrated is the wrong one and why its wrong to perform it that way.)

dAlen
Ok.. so, How long have you been there, how long will you be staying there, and how much effort are you putting in to learning the local language? Years ago when I was in Tokyo at Kodokan, I'd go to the gaijin training every day, where the instruction was in English, after spending a while in the main dojo getting thumped around by whomever would take the time...
An Italian fellow showed up. Spoke no English. Japanese people have a large tendency to have studied a little English in school, so if necessary I could get by in my language, even in 1978... The Italian - well, he HAD to learn some Japanese, because he wasn't able to get by in English or Italian, as there was very little Italian spoken in Tokyo at the time... In the 4 months I was there, and in the 3 months I knew this fellow, he picked up much more useful Japanese than me, because he had to.

Are people allowing you to get away with living in (Hungary?) this country and using English? If so - and if you want to start understanding the lessons - it might pay to work very hard in the 7 days/week that you're there to get some of the Magyar lingo (more than my "egan" and "nem") so that during your 2 Aiki practices per week, you can garner more information...

If you're not going to be there for very long, and don't want to learn the language, then it's OK, I guess, and you can decide whether or not to stay with Aikido when you return to an English speaking country..

However, the choice to stay with Aikido or to go elsewhere is entirely yours...
Cheers
Walter

SeiserL
09-08-2007, 06:30 AM
the grass is not always so green.

I had heard that the grass wasn't greener on the other side of the fence. It is greener where you water it.

odudog
09-08-2007, 07:32 AM
I think that the problem that you are having is not with Aikido, but with you keep setting short term goals. You can't live an entire life setting only short term goals. Something has to be long term. If you set your goal to be an effective Thai boxer in 4 - 6 months then you will fail at this as well, plus you might still have the language barrier there. Thai boxing is easier to grasp than Aikido but in that short time anyone is destined to fail. The complexity of Aikido is what is so fascinating to me and keeps me coming back and I have been at this for a total of 7 years with a huge break in between that time and I am still only a beginner. Could I have learned everything there is to know about Thai boxing within those 7 years? I don't know but it is a possibility. I've been struggling with the Japanese language since 1988. I also took huge breaks within my instruction of this as well but the complexity and necessity is what keeps me coming back. I will learn Aikido and Japanese if it kills me. :grr: Long term goals set.

Basia Halliop
09-08-2007, 08:31 AM
Personally, if you don't look forward to your practice (at least most days), if you aren't interested and into it while you're there, then I don't really see the point anyway - life is short and unless you have a specific practical need for the skills, it's kind of a waste of your life to spend it doing something that isn't engaging you.

Plus it works best that way in a lot of things that require long-term work anyway -- if you find something that draws you in and engages you enough on a day to day basis that you can practice for the sake of practicing, staying there long enough to get something out of it becomes simply a by-product instead of some kind of sacrifice.

Erick Mead
09-08-2007, 08:56 AM
I had heard that the grass wasn't greener on the other side of the fence. It is greener where you water it.Point taken. However, it is far too often made to look greener simply because there is also much more bullshit lying around over there. It grows fast, but wilts easily -- because bullshit is not a steady fodder. It drops here and there with no reliable coherence, and it doesn't last a season. And a hard rain washes it all away.

The toughest grass grows in the near-deserts and steppes, where it receives little water, hardly any fertilizer, but a never-ending and nourishing light. It grows slowly, making deep roots, steadily but unseen and yet bursts forth in bloom unlooked for at the first really hard rain.

If you cut it down in frustration before then -- you have missed it. As in most things that are worthwhile, the chief requirements are perseverance and trust in the operation of things that are presently unseen.

dps
09-08-2007, 09:06 AM
If you quit Aikido now you will be banned for the rest of your life from practicing Aikido again.

Naw, just joking.:D

If Aikido doesn't fit you now then try something else. Try other martial arts until you find an art you like. Once you have a foundation in one martial art then try other arts to complement your foundation. Maybe one of those arts will be Aikido again,

David

Dewey
09-08-2007, 01:56 PM
In the end, the choice is yours and yours alone. You should never base your decisions on what you read/see on the internet. However, since you asked, I'll give you my solicited opinion as one beginner (less than a year of Aikido myself) to another:

First, presuming you're a grown adult and not an angst-ridden teenager, it's perfectly natural to get extremely frustrated in the beginning when learning so complicated a martial art as Aikido. To learn Aikido as a grown adult requires literally learning how to walk, talk, move and breathe all over again. So, patience is the key.

Second, what are your goals with Aikido and what do you want out of it and what do you expect Aikido to do for you? Other posters have also made this observation. As with any martial art, you figure all of that out the first few months....after you get "a taste" of it. There's no shame in saying "Aikido is not for me." It's just a matter of being honest with yourself and clearly identifying your goals.

Third, no single martial art is the "uber-martial art." Each style was created to address specific tactical scenarios. To expect Aikido to "cover all of the bases" and make you invincible or the ultimate fighter is a bit naive. That's why you crosstrain.

Lastly, so many "ex-Aikidoka" make the mistake of thinking that all Aikido is just like the Aikido they studied at that specific dojo under that specific instructor. Matter of fact, that's how most of the trolls over at Bullshido developed their bias against Aikido. Oftentimes, simply pursuing another instructor at another dojo makes a world of difference and will completely change your mind to the positive (it did for me).

My advice: shop all of the local Aikido dojo, even in the neighboring towns, and see the different styles and instructors and try some of them before you call it quits on Aikido.

Mark Uttech
09-08-2007, 01:57 PM
Thinking of quitting never works. It is better to just quit and then see what sort of experience you have.

In gassho,

Mark

dps
09-08-2007, 04:23 PM
Time for an inspirational video.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=877993891577096481&q=shodokan&total=138&start=0&num=10&so=0&type=search&plindex=1

David

dalen7
09-08-2007, 04:59 PM
Im at a loss of words to say really - this isn't a bad thing, probably good actually. ;)

I didnt expect this many responses to the thread in all honesty - just sharing my feelings/experience with Aikido at the time...some great comments indeed, that I tend to agree with.

Overall this has been an opportunity for introspection for me, which has been a good thing.

I am learning quite a bit on different levels and dropping some of my pre-conceived notions about things.

Again, it has been fun to read through the different comments posted - as for me and where I go from here...well, taking things step by step and learning to enjoy, observe and 'live' the present moment. In this, is the key, at least for me - just a matter of integrating this philosophy into every aspect of life until it becomes natural. ;)

Peace

dAlen

mathewjgano
09-08-2007, 07:49 PM
...All you will build in Aikido is false confidence... There is nothing so amusing on this forum as people who talk about not hurting an attacker, as if they of all martial artists have the ability to be so magnanimous.
I'm all for experiencing different forms of training; I'd even recommend it, but I think you're painting with a wide brush; though obviously you're entitled to your opinion. Not to get off on another topic here, but I wanted to address a couple points.
Confidence is an individual thing and anyone who thinks they're prepared for the unknown is making an assumption, regardess of what art they choose. I've studied nothing but Aikido and I seriously doubt I have false confidences from it.
As for not hurting attackers, i think that's an ideal we strive for and anyone who has studied Aikido long enough recognizes how easy it can be to harm someone...or more to the point, how hard it can be to NOT harm someone when you're twisting limbs this way and that.
Maybe my views are the exception to Aikido?
Take care.

mathewjgano
09-08-2007, 07:54 PM
If you quit Aikido now you will be banned for the rest of your life from practicing Aikido again.

Naw, just joking.:D

If Aikido doesn't fit you now then try something else. Try other martial arts until you find an art you like. Once you have a foundation in one martial art then try other arts to complement your foundation. Maybe one of those arts will be Aikido again,

David

What?! Crap! I'm glad I snuck back in wearing a disguise! ...although I'm tired of being asked if I'm related to Groucho Marx!

crbateman
09-09-2007, 12:28 AM
as for me and where I go from here...well, taking things step by step and learning to enjoy, observe and 'live' the present moment. In this, is the key, at least for me - just a matter of integrating this philosophy into every aspect of life until it becomes natural. ;)This is a much more enlightened outlook than that displayed in your first post. It's always good to remember that this whole thing's a journey, and that you should relax and enjoy the scenery along the way.

Lyle Bogin
09-09-2007, 06:49 AM
Things like muay thai are a great as a right of passage. Slowly you learn to bang with your training partners, fight, and most importantly (I think) take a beating without letting it affect your center. What I found at the end was a surprise though....I was still just as pissed and scared as when I started! But at least I could knock someone out if I had to ;)

lbb
09-09-2007, 08:00 AM
Dalen, I remember some of your earlier posts. They, and this one, make me wonder if the heart of your problem is that you're expecting some practice (aikido, in this case) to be all things to you. People can do this successfully -- gain all, or nearly all, of the things that they want from a single practice -- but only if what they want is very simple (and note, "simple" does not mean "easy", nor are simple aspirations by definition trite or trivial). You're after several different things: you want to be able to do realistic self-defense (which, by the way, will be very difficult if you never stop to define what sort of attack you are realistically likely to encounter); you want community; you want to be able to "kick butt"; you want a spiritual practice; you want to be "rooted in peace". It's not unusual for people to start training martial arts with hopes that they'll get all these things -- hey, they do in the movies, right? But it's just not realistic to expect to find all of those things in one practice.

Aikido is a martial art that, if diligently practiced, will eventually give you some ability to defend yourself against certain kinds of attacks. It won't protect you from a bullet, and its effectiveness will always be somewhat limited by your physical constraints and your ability to use your body effectively. It is not a spiritual practice, despite the fact that many practitioners feel (or claim to feel) that they experience some kind of spiritual whatsis in their aikido practice. There is no requirement that an aikido sensei be a priest of some kind, a spiritually enlightened person, or an expert in esoteric practices; therefore, there are few senseis who are qualified to teach in those matters, and most have the humility not to try. Aikido does not cure warts, it does not do windows, and it will not get the crabgrass out of your lawn. It is what it is, and I believe that it is a worthy practice -- one of many.

You may decide to stay, you may decide to go. Either way, I think you would benefit from reexamining exactly what you hope to get out of the various endeavors in your life. Otherwise you will spend your life flitting from one four-to-six month enthusiasm to another, never really delving into any of them deeply enough to realize the gains that each practice has to offer.

dps
09-09-2007, 08:11 AM
I had heard that the grass wasn't greener on the other side of the fence. It is greener where you water it.

Water = practice?

David

Erick Mead
09-09-2007, 08:56 AM
As for not hurting attackers, i think that's an ideal we strive for and anyone who has studied Aikido long enough recognizes how easy it can be to harm someone...or more to the point, how hard it can be to NOT harm someone when you're twisting limbs this way and that.
Maybe my views are the exception to Aikido?Aikido is love. Who knew Connie Francis secretly practiced Aikido?

"♫You Always Hurt ♪ the One You Love ♫"

SeiserL
09-09-2007, 10:05 AM
Water = practice?
IMHO, yep.

Dan Austin
09-09-2007, 11:00 AM
Confidence is an individual thing and anyone who thinks they're prepared for the unknown is making an assumption, regardess of what art they choose. I've studied nothing but Aikido and I seriously doubt I have false confidences from it.

Really? Is there no part of you that believes you have more fighting ability now than when you started Aikido? If there is, that is likely to be false confidence.

mathewjgano
09-09-2007, 02:34 PM
Really? Is there no part of you that believes you have more fighting ability now than when you started Aikido? If there is, that is likely to be false confidence.

My abilities in coordination and power are definately better now than 10 years ago. I understand how the body works better, yeah. But as for how well I'll fare in a fight, I'm not so naive to think I'm going to do well. Even a person with higher skill can lose to a neophyte given the proper conditions...and that includes more than pysical circumstances...a wayward thought could potentially mean the differece if it's at a bad moment. That is why i doubt I have a false sense of confidence. My odds of protecting myself are better, but even supposing I can handle 99% of the people out there, that doesn't mean I won't fall to that 1%.
To use my own semantic bent: I have worse fighting ability now, perhaps, but I can protect myself better, generally speaking.
Take care

statisticool
09-09-2007, 04:02 PM
Third, no single martial art is the "uber-martial art." Each style was created to address specific tactical scenarios .

Exactly

The best martial art is the martial art that... wins most sporting events, is most used by police, is most used by armed forces, focuses on techniques banned in martial arts competitions, is most successful against a single opponent, is most successful against multiple opponents, is practiced by most people, uses weapons, trains full contact, trains full resistance, has the most 'you got owned!' videos on YouTube, has the least damning videos on YouTube, trains the largest muscles in the body, has the most emphasis on defense, trains to deliver the most power, you have successfully used in a real-life self defense situation, you can practice throughout your whole life, has the most impressive philosophy, is least interested in strength, gets you in the most meditative state, has the most discipline, has a standardized syllabus all over the world, is the most affordable, is the oldest, practices in a nice environment/facility, is the newest, takes the longest time to master, takes the least amount of time to master, is the most convenient geographically, is held at the most convenient times, is heavily recommended by your friends, confers the most cardiovascular benefits, suits your body type, is open to all ages and genders, originated from a culture you are really interested in, trains using realistic environment and parameters, has the least fraud in it, has the lowest injury rate, is most aesthetic, or simply the one you enjoy.

the answer to each one of these criteria is most likely a different martial art. That is, "best" is relative to specifics.

Consider this: the best martial art is the martial art that meets the most of the above criteria, at a given time, for you.

dps
09-09-2007, 04:43 PM
Exactly

The best martial art is the martial art that... wins most sporting events, is most used by police, is most used by armed forces, focuses on techniques banned in martial arts competitions, is most successful against a single opponent, is most successful against multiple opponents, is practiced by most people, uses weapons, trains full contact, trains full resistance, has the most 'you got owned!' videos on YouTube, has the least damning videos on YouTube, trains the largest muscles in the body, has the most emphasis on defense, trains to deliver the most power, you have successfully used in a real-life self defense situation, you can practice throughout your whole life, has the most impressive philosophy, is least interested in strength, gets you in the most meditative state, has the most discipline, has a standardized syllabus all over the world, is the most affordable, is the oldest, practices in a nice environment/facility, is the newest, takes the longest time to master, takes the least amount of time to master, is the most convenient geographically, is held at the most convenient times, is heavily recommended by your friends, confers the most cardiovascular benefits, suits your body type, is open to all ages and genders, originated from a culture you are really interested in, trains using realistic environment and parameters, has the least fraud in it, has the lowest injury rate, is most aesthetic, or simply the one you enjoy.


You forgot, "has the secret to internal strength".

David