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dragonteeth
08-02-2007, 07:38 AM
While reading the various threads about aikido's effectiveness on the street, vs. MMA, etc., I began to think about training ideas that might bring a little more "realism" to practice for occasional use, while preserving the still very effective traditional training methods for regular practice. I thought I would throw this post out there to see what different dojos do to move the mindset from the mat to the street.

To give you some examples - we have done some hanmi handachi techniques from a desk chair rather than from seiza recently that everyone seemed to really enjoy. Another dojo that I've trained in practiced techniques either in the dark or while blindfolded to simulate the dark alley/home invasion scenarios.

What other sorts of things have you tried that seemed effective?

Thanks for the input!
Lori

Ron Tisdale
08-02-2007, 08:16 AM
"real life" simulations == oxymoron
:D
Sorry, couldn't help it.

Seriously though, I guess anything that gets you to apply waza "out of the accepted box" will be of benefit. Doesn't really matter how "real" the situation is. What matters is that the situation is one you are not used to, and that you connect it somehow with your trained reflexes.

Best,
Ron

Budd
08-02-2007, 08:19 AM
Go find people that *really* have the skills that you want to emulate. Train with them. If they can teach you to learn these skills, keep training with them. If they can't, go find another teacher.

Marie Noelle Fequiere
08-02-2007, 11:57 AM
One of our sempais have a method that freaks me out sometimes, but that should be really useful: During the warmup, at the beginning of the class, he will start jogging around the room, and we follow. Until, suddenly, he jumps out of the line and starts attacking us randomly. We don't know if his going to do that today, when he's going to start it, or what technique his going to use on who.
Sometimes, I panick, but it only means that I need more of it.:D

DonMagee
08-02-2007, 12:52 PM
My bjj class has a habit of people randomly attacking people before and after class. It's common to have someone walk up behind you while you are engaged in conversation and just start choking you. Or to get tripped, thrown, punched, kicked, etc if you are not aware.

Personally, I get enough of it from just good old normal sparing.

Paul Sanderson-Cimino
08-02-2007, 06:26 PM
I would suggest that, rather than some sort of reality-based scenario, you work on plain old randori. But don't do it like 99% of aikido people do it.

nikau
08-03-2007, 12:41 AM
hi.
i'm new to aikido BUT i've stuck to the methods i used in muaythai and boxing. Just plain old sparring BUT because i'm such a newb i may only practice keeping distance while my partner tries to plug me with punches and kicks. (lightly)

I've found this helps a lot with foot work. Even enter every now and then BUT i never try and throw.

made me more confident with my aikido to some extent :)

Charles Hill
08-03-2007, 01:53 PM
Hi Lori,

You might try holding your breath for a number of techniques, for example doing four techniques as nage/tori. Your body will start to react in panic that will make the training more realistic. You can also try this as uke. Even harder, you can breathe out all the air right before uke attacks and then do the technique with no air at all. You will probably find that the best thing to do is to relax as much as possible yet still be able to effectively move.

This kind of training develops familiarity of what it is like to be involved in a dangerous situation. You can easily do these things in the middle of a regular training.

good luck
Charles

Dewey
08-03-2007, 04:28 PM
While reading the various threads about aikido's effectiveness on the street, vs. MMA, etc., I began to think about training ideas that might bring a little more "realism" to practice for occasional use, while preserving the still very effective traditional training methods for regular practice. I thought I would throw this post out there to see what different dojos do to move the mindset from the mat to the street.

To give you some examples - we have done some hanmi handachi techniques from a desk chair rather than from seiza recently that everyone seemed to really enjoy. Another dojo that I've trained in practiced techniques either in the dark or while blindfolded to simulate the dark alley/home invasion scenarios.

What other sorts of things have you tried that seemed effective?

Thanks for the input!
Lori

That's a good start, methinks. I especially think training in the dark will be most beneficial, since many predatory assaults occur under cover of darkness. You also might consider the "verbal assault" and "physical intimidation" factor...which many martial arts, traditional or MMA, often neglect in their quest for realistic training. So often, physical fights begin with verbal fights that escalate. Also, folks often react in odd ways when physically itimidated by a large, imposing person. You never know how you'll react until such things happen. Have someone come in from another dojo who's "onboard" with your training programme, whom nobody knows, come in to verbally assault and physically itimidate your dojomates, this includes the use of very foul language and "in yur face" attitude and shoving. That's as real as it gets....that's how many "real life" self-defense instances occur. Thrust me on this, we have an assistant instructor who is a former Marine Corps drill sergeant!

For what it's worth.

statisticool
08-03-2007, 05:42 PM
...I began to think about training ideas that might bring a little more "realism" to practice for occasional use, while preserving the still very effective traditional training methods for regular practice.


Here are some things that I've found useful in my general martial arts training.

In one class, we bounce tennis balls while doing various movements to get coordination down. I had the idea of using some bouncy balls and cutting them irregularly so that their bounce isn't predictable. I tried this out at home and now I do this all the time.

I'm also in the process of making a target that flashes in a random location to signal you where to strike it instead of just hitting a target where you want to hit it.

In general, I'd suggest incorporating more uncertainty in the form of randomness. Some reasons why this may be beneficial

-can model uncertainty in real life
-helps you approach each situation fresh and creatively
-can 'change up' workout, add freshness to it, help prevent burn out

Justin