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nikau
07-19-2007, 10:23 PM
1st of all our dojo come under aikikai, practice is geared towards being martially creditable and our sensei is great, in that, while being martial the emphasis is on helping each other and stressing NOT hurting each other.

He's also suggested training on different nights with another sensei or dojo to help find aikido in a different way.

Is it WORTH practicing a different aikido? OR better sticking to a school in the same organization?

I know there's different styles BUT do they differ that much?

Most of our other students go to a sensei that we already have a lot to do with in our organization. While he still teaches differently the aikido is much the same.

Would this change if i tried Yoseikan, Yoshinkan on another night?
Would it hinder my training?

Currently studying 8 months.

Nafis Zahir
07-19-2007, 10:36 PM
Most of the styles are as much the same as they are different. That being said, I would suggest that you establish a firm foundation and strong basics in one style, before going out and trying to learn another. The differences in the application of technique may be slight, but it can be very challenging.

Carl Thompson
07-19-2007, 10:41 PM
In retrospect, I would have preferred mixing styles after having mastered my first to a much higher level. You have enough to learn with one style. If you are effectively learning twice as many ways to do the same thing, it can get difficult to segregate. I met a girl doing Seifukai here mixed with Aikikai who had exactly the same problems as me, so it seems those two styles together can be particularly confusing .

There’s a discussion about this on another thread:

For me, the most confusing thing was doing different styles of aikido. I started off doing ‘Aikikai style' aikido (although not part of the Aikikai) in the U.K., moved to Japan and suddenly found that I couldn't find or get into any dojo doing the same kind of thing (I was in Hamamatsu). So I ended up doing Seifukai (that's Yoseikan) and got really muddled. I did a bit of Shodokan and Tesshinkai which seemed to fit together better, but the Seifukai that I was mainly doing was sometimes in complete contrast to what I'd done before. I couldn't even sit in seiza without getting a "dame". I arrived back in the UK with both styles mixed together -- which didn't usually work out: for example, I'd have my feet positioned the Seifukai way, do an Aikikai-type movement and practically walk into a fist. In the short term, it was a pain although I guess now I'm starting to appreciate the extra perspective.
:freaky:

The best way to find out is to just try it for yourself though. Some styles conflict less than others.

Kind regards

Carl

wxyzabc
07-19-2007, 10:51 PM
Hya Justin

Imho it really good to train with as many teachers and different styles as possible....I think its fair to say no one style is "perfect" and what may be lacking in one can be found in another.

I think my own understanding improved a fair bit when I started mooching around. That said it does bring its own problems....the aikikai grading system is not designed for people who dont commit to one dojo, and neither does it accomodate people who improve quite quickly. As one of my teachers said "we can keep doing the wrong thing over and over for 15 years"...looking around can help you find what works best for you and a reasonable teacher will allow some "flexibility of technique" in their dojo hopefully...unless you live in Japan..lol ^^

crbateman
07-19-2007, 10:56 PM
Better understanding comes from more complete information. But I would recommend that a person would better benefit from a good foundation in one style, rather than try to take multiple styles in as a beginner. That way, you will have enough experience under your belt to understand the differences (and the similarities) of other styles. Enjoy the journey.

Mark Uttech
07-20-2007, 04:06 AM
"Style" seems to create its own confusions. I can see the real need for people to have a home dojo where they can focus and grow. There are so many seminars that a person can begin to shift their focus around (this generally should begin after one has reached 3rd kyu. What I mean, I guess, is that one should not be afraid to venture out at this point). I also see the need for people to think of themselves as 'lifelong students', which is what O'Sensei said he was, and I have heard other shihan say the same thing.

In gassho,

Mark

Tony Wagstaffe
07-20-2007, 04:21 AM
Absolutely!!
Tony

Roman Kremianski
07-20-2007, 09:05 AM
Give Tomiki Aikido a try if you've only stuck to Aikikai this whole time.

PeterR
07-20-2007, 09:35 AM
Hell I'm Tomiki and I am enjoying training with the Aikikia here in China.

I think it is important to see other views but equally important to have a strong base.

Christopher Gee
07-20-2007, 11:35 AM
NO! THERE IS ONLY ONE WAY! THE WAY OF THE MIGHTY DEATH SWORD KAI KAN RYU!

On another note, variety is the spiece of life.

Either piece advice is good.

Regards,

SeiserL
07-20-2007, 06:06 PM
IMHO, get a foundation in a style.
And, become a regular attendee at everyone's seminars.
Hope to see you at one.

DCP
07-20-2007, 10:32 PM
My .02: if you have multiple choices of styles to choose from, find the instructor that you are the most comfortable with, has great ability, and you like as a human being. Then get a firm basis in that particular style with that instructor. When sensei says you're ready to try other styles, then go ahead.

Dewey
07-21-2007, 01:56 PM
IMHO, get a foundation in a style.
And, become a regular attendee at everyone's seminars.
Hope to see you at one.

I agree with this suggestion. The best means to get exposure to other styles of Aikido whilst still maintaining a solid & consistant technical foundation is to frequent seminars, Aikikai and non. Although some sensei don't mind "dojo hoppers," others do. By attending seminars, you can get a "sample" of the style w/o dojo hopping. Also, if by either dojo hopping or taking seminars you come to realize that you're with the best all-round instructor for your needs anyway, then you're spared those awkward situations of leaving a dojo. The Aikido community is, believe it or not, rather small & clannish. Keep that in mind.

My .02: if you have multiple choices of styles to choose from, find the instructor that you are the most comfortable with, has great ability, and you like as a human being. Then get a firm basis in that particular style with that instructor. When sensei says you're ready to try other styles, then go ahead.

This is very sound advice, also. I live in a large Midwestern city with 5 active Aikido dojo, and a couple of McDojos that claim to offer "instruction" in Aikido. I "shopped" them all, observed a few classes at each, interviewed the chief instructor and asked very pointed (but polite) questions. Although affiliation was a topic of discussion, my criteria primarily revolved around two issues: 1) did I feel that I could, as a grown adult, learn from the instructor; and 2) did the students seem "happy" and view one another as a team.

I chose my current school primarliy because of the instructor, not his affiliation (which is non-Aikikai, by the way). You should always choose a dojo because of the instructor, not the school's affiliation. Only worry about affiliation when your 1st kyu, since affiliation only really effects yudansha, specifically those who want to go on and teach themselves.

nikau
07-22-2007, 07:44 PM
Brilliant response guys thatnks i really appreciate it.

Daniel Pierson wrote:
My .02: if you have multiple choices of styles to choose from, find the instructor that you are the most comfortable with, has great ability, and you like as a human being. Then get a firm basis in that particular style with that instructor. When sensei says you're ready to try other styles, then go ahead.

this is how i chose my dojo. i was so impressed with sensei and his concern for developing his students that i knew i'd do well to train there.

Some really solid advice all round by everyone. I think i'll talk to my sensei and see what he recommends also.

THANKS.

KamiKaze_Evolution
07-23-2007, 10:22 AM
I had been practice Aikikai and Yoshinkan seperately, but i suffer Yoshinkan though and that tough practice is enjoyable to me