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Rhino2693
07-14-2007, 12:10 PM
I keep hearing that aikido does not work in a fight or if someone is unarmed....neither of these is true. When someone throws a punch, it can be treated the same as if someone is trying to stab you with a knife. This is very basic but it works...simply catch their arm or hand while twisting and redirecting their arm. If done correctly, you can either have complete control of the attacker or in a more advanced version knock them out all in one motion.

Rhino2693
07-14-2007, 12:53 PM
will some one someone with expierence in aikido please post just to see if i am accurate, i am only a beginner, and not even in a class.

jennifer paige smith
07-14-2007, 01:10 PM
I keep hearing that aikido does not work in a fight or if someone is unarmed....neither of these is true. When someone throws a punch, it can be treated the same as if someone is trying to stab you with a knife. This is very basic but it works...simply catch their arm or hand while twisting and redirecting their arm. If done correctly, you can either have complete control of the attacker or in a more advanced version knock them out all in one motion.

As to the technique as you describe above(not that aikido doesn't work blah,blah,blah):
In theory, this is true. In practice,it depends on the person.

One thing i can tell you with confidence is that good budo practice will change your inner condition to see situations more fully, to examine your environment earlier and to contextualize a fight in manageable terms. If it is a 'unwinnable' situation you will know that early(er). If it is a situation where body placement makes all the difference, you will contemplate that. If the person is unstable, beyond typical violence (i.ie. mentally ill) you wil be able to feel that and act accordingly. As to which technique you use.....training will arise in unusual energetic ways and also in the form of standard techniques such as Kotegaeshi, shiho nage, sumi- otoshi.

Rhino2693
07-14-2007, 01:11 PM
what exactly is budo?

jennifer paige smith
07-14-2007, 05:05 PM
what exactly is budo?

Wikipedia says:
Budo is a compound of the word bu , meaning war or martial; and do, meaning path or way. Specifically, do is derived from the Buddhist Sanskrit m?rga (meaning the 'path' to enlightenment).[1] The term refers to the idea of formulating propositions, subjecting them to philosophical critique and then following a 'path' to realize them.[2] D? signifies a 'way of life'. Do in the Japanese context, is experiential term, experiential in the sense that practice (the way of life) is the norm to verify the validity of the discipline cultivated through a given art form. The modern budo has no external enemy, only the internal enemy, one's ego that must be fought[3](state of Muga-mushin). Similarly to budo, bujutsu is a compound of the words bu and jutsu, meaning science, craft, or art. Thus, budo is most often translated as "the way of war", or "martial way", while bujutsu is translated as "science of war" or "martial craft." However, both budo and bujutsu are used interchangeably in English with the term "martial arts".

I say
Budo refers to traditional 'martial' methods.

Another meaningful translation is the"way to stop the spear", however one sees fit.
I'm sure other posters will offer you their definitions also.

CitoMaramba
07-14-2007, 05:10 PM
"budo" means grapes in Japanese..

jennifer paige smith
07-14-2007, 05:10 PM
"budo" means grapes in Japanese..

See. Martial arts are a product of Nature.:-)

Ketsan
07-14-2007, 05:13 PM
what exactly is budo?

Budo is using martial training to develop yourself as a person rather than just becoming a better fighter. So basically it's a spirtual practice just like meditation etc only you might pick up some skills that'll help you out if you get into a violent situation along the way.

jennifer paige smith
07-14-2007, 05:15 PM
Budo is using martial training to develop yourself as a person rather than just becoming a better fighter. So basically it's a spirtual practice just like meditation etc only you might pick up some skills that'll help you out if you get into a violent situation along the way.

and....you get to eat grapes;)

Ketsan
07-14-2007, 05:20 PM
and....you get to eat grapes;)

If they're not seedless I'm not touching them. Foul things grapes with seeds.

jennifer paige smith
07-14-2007, 05:23 PM
If they're not seedless I'm not touching them. Foul things grapes with seeds.


Not even for ammunition?:D

CitoMaramba
07-14-2007, 05:25 PM
... now if he asked "what is 武道 ?"
then...

jennifer paige smith
07-14-2007, 05:28 PM
... now if he asked "what is ?? ?"
then...

how do you pronounce that?
and does that mean we can't eat grapes?

Ketsan
07-14-2007, 05:29 PM
Not even for ammunition?:D

Well maybe if I really wanted to inflict suffering on someone. "Hey, here's some nice grapes, shame you'll never enjoy them cuz right in the middle is a seed".

CitoMaramba
07-14-2007, 05:30 PM
how do you pronounce that?
and does that mean we can't eat grapes?

It depends.. a certain pony-tailed nanadan prounounces it as "takemichi" :)

And yes we can eat grapes. Even seedless ones..

Ketsan
07-14-2007, 05:30 PM
... now if he asked "what is 武道 ?"
then...

These are the kind of mistakes beginners make.:D

jennifer paige smith
07-14-2007, 05:31 PM
Well maybe if I really wanted to inflict suffering on someone. "Hey, here's some nice grapes, shame you'll never enjoy them cuz right in the middle is a seed".

ha,ha,ha,ha,ha,ha,ha,ha.................

CNYMike
07-14-2007, 05:58 PM
I keep hearing that aikido does not work in a fight or if someone is unarmed....neither of these is true. ......

'Course it works. That's why there are people who swear by it. If you surf this forum long enough, you'll see posts along those lines.

MMA works too; I wouldn't be surprised if some of those guys have their testimonials, too. So arguing over what should or shouldn't work is, IMHO, pointless.

And on the subject of budo, I prefer grape juice; I'm not much of a fresh fruit guy.

Don
07-14-2007, 06:10 PM
What you describe as a defense against against a punch is in principle true. In fact ikkyo undo is really all you need. We practice this against right cross and left hook all the time. I tcan be used to redirect or provide an opening to a technique. It is different than tsuki though because the punch has a little arc to it and it is at your face which is much different than coming at your middle. You must practice face punches to get over the fear of face punches.

DonMagee
07-14-2007, 06:46 PM
I actually think a stab and a punch are very different things. I'll break down why.

1) There are many kinds of punches, hooks, jabs, uppercuts, overhand strikes, etc.
2) People usually will not stab from the range in which they punch, most people stab from a clinch.

If we refer to the dramatic lunge punch and the really dump lunge stab, then yes, they are the same. But do people really attack like that? I know I wouldn't, even before I had any training I wouldn't. I'd try to rush, close the distance and make short fast stabs to the soft spots.

So they might share a little similarity to clinch fighting uppercuts, elbows, body hooks, etc. But not the types of punches most people usually consider when we talk about punching.

Roman Kremianski
07-14-2007, 09:01 PM
Listen to Don mate, he's stabbed many people in his young days. :)

xuzen
07-14-2007, 09:42 PM
I actually think a stab and a punch are very different things. I'll break down why.

1) There are many kinds of punches, hooks, jabs, uppercuts, overhand strikes, etc.
2) People usually will not stab from the range in which they punch, most people stab from a clinch.

If we refer to the dramatic lunge punch and the really dump lunge stab, then yes, they are the same. But do people really attack like that? I know I wouldn't, even before I had any training I wouldn't. I'd try to rush, close the distance and make short fast stabs to the soft spots.

So they might share a little similarity to clinch fighting uppercuts, elbows, body hooks, etc. But not the types of punches most people usually consider when we talk about punching.

Don has a PhD is STABOLOGY (TM). Listen to him man.

As for the grapes, my favourite is the fermented type, better still if they were crushed prior with human feet.

Boon

DonMagee
07-15-2007, 08:57 AM
Just don't tell anyone.

Seriously, do we really still believe people draw knives, stand outside the range of each other and lunge in?

jennifer paige smith
07-15-2007, 10:17 AM
Just don't tell anyone.

Seriously, do we really still believe people draw knives, stand outside the range of each other and lunge in?

Granted.

And it also depends on what 'people' you're talking about. Here are some fairly accurate pieces of info for as far as generalizations go: Prison style stabbings follow particular a pattern, shanking with multiple quick stabs; White guy in bar holds knife way too far in front of him and is pretty slow on the draw; young guy never held a knife before his friends gave hime one this year telegraphs his intentions very early; chica chicana and her gang come at you as a group and jab you from above in a mass of confusion, razor blades are also a favorite in this group.
Diverse and focused training in ones particular style, along with a developed ability to settle inside during stress, are allies in training for anything.

Just don't tell them.

gdandscompserv
07-15-2007, 02:29 PM
Seriously, do we really still believe people draw knives, stand outside the range of each other and lunge in?
If they both have knives, perhaps.

ChrisHein
07-15-2007, 02:30 PM
Just don't tell anyone.

Seriously, do we really still believe people draw knives, stand outside the range of each other and lunge in?

Do you believe that this NEVER happens? I saw two hobos doing this very thing once.

Ryan,
In order to get an answer, you must take time to formulate a question. Asking, "hey, isn't it true that I could just grab someone's arm, twist it down and pin them, armed or unarmed?" is a question, be the equivalent to asking "hey in tennis, can't I just pick up a racket hit the ball and win all the tournaments?".

The answer is of coarse yes, and also no. If you ask a vague question you will get a vague answer. Ask one question at a time, make sure that each question heads in the direction of the ultimate answer you need.

jennifer paige smith
07-15-2007, 02:33 PM
Do you believe that this NEVER happens? I saw two hobos doing this very thing once.

Ryan,
In order to get an answer, you must take time to formulate a question. Asking, "hey, isn't it true that I could just grab someone's arm, twist it down and pin them, armed or unarmed?" is a question, be the equivalent to asking "hey in tennis, can't I just pick up a racket hit the ball and win all the tournaments?".

The answer is of coarse yes, and also no. If you ask a vague question you will get a vague answer. Ask one question at a time, make sure that each question heads in the direction of the ultimate answer you need.




Seems that Chris Hein can give very good advice.:)

salim
07-16-2007, 08:54 AM
Don Magee has the correct perspective. The realities of fighting are sometimes shatter by mysticism.

Aikibu
07-16-2007, 10:43 AM
IMHO 95% of all Martial Artists would lose an "unarmed" confrontation with a skilled knife fighter.

Don't fool yourselves. If you want to learn how to defend against any edged weapon... you had better know how to use one.

William Hazen

In a knife fight There is no Second Place.

jennifer paige smith
07-16-2007, 10:44 AM
Don Magee has the correct perspective. The realities of fighting are sometimes shatter by mysticism.

and sometimes the reality of mystery shatters the myths about fighting. You just don't know.

ChrisHein
07-16-2007, 11:49 AM
IMHO 95% of all Martial Artists would lose an "unarmed" confrontation with a skilled knife fighter.

Don't fool yourselves. If you want to learn how to defend against any edged weapon... you had better know how to use one.

William Hazen

In a knife fight There is no Second Place.

NICE!

Beard of Chuck Norris
07-16-2007, 12:19 PM
In a knife fight There is no Second Place.

One goes to the hospital, the other to the morgue.

philippe willaume
07-18-2007, 09:32 AM
Hello don
I would say we will find all type of knife fighter and you can not have generic rules.
In Missouri and Mississippi in the mid 1800, there was (and may be there still is ) a tradition of Bowie fighting based on French small sword…..

Nowadays I am not sure, it seems to vary a lot according to what the author has to sell.
From what I have experienced small sword, stiking art people and escrima people tend to snipe at the hands.
People with a grappling background tend to try to grabble and then stab (very often like a sawing machine).
People who are proficient in both fencing and grappling then to mix both
So I have seen a bit of both (but it is hardly a representative panel)

As William alluded I would prefer 50 matches against Bas Rutten that facing a skilful swordsman when he has a sword and I don’t.
That being said, against a knife, empty handed and wearing appropriate clothing (like a good leather jacket) makes things much less iffy.

For me what really the problem is that most people do not realise how easy it is to change direction of knife attack and that makes voiding a single point deflection/block very iffy.
phil

geoffsaulnier
07-18-2007, 01:57 PM
Safest - just don't be there
Safe-ish - enter real deep at the first opportunity, stand fairly close and place a hand just on the outside of their triceps. From there, they cannot effectively attack you and you can feel when they try to readjust the distance.

Whatever you do, for goodness sake, don't try to catch a hand or an arm - they move way way too fast, are too retractable and are too floppy to effectively attack the centre with in a realistic confrontation. No matter how fast the hand or arm is moving, the shoulder/triceps is nearly immobile, and off to the side behind someone is fairly safe, and a good place to start running from!

G>

Cyrijl
07-18-2007, 02:30 PM
Sory Post Deleted. I couldn't see page 2, then after my post I could.

Chikai Aikidoka
07-19-2007, 02:36 AM
http://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/knifefighting.html

An interesting article on knife fighting with different subjects towards the middle of the page ....

BR,
MC

ChrisHein
07-19-2007, 10:55 AM
Marc MacYoung is an interesting fellow. I've seen his video. Personally I think the system of Aikido is much more helpful.

Aikibu
07-19-2007, 11:06 AM
I posted this back in May...

"Aikibu
05-13-2007, 03:39 PM
I emphatically vote no...Unless you are the type of Aikidoka who has an extensive background in some form of knife fighting and practices it consistantly.

I recommended this article to Sensei Ledyard a brief while back on Martial Arts vs Knife Fighting...In the Volume 15 Number 4 2006 Journal of Asian Martial Arts John McCurry and Eliot Lee Grossman J.D. wrote a great article titled "The Top Ten Errors of Martial Artists Defending Against a Blade."

The Abstract Quote: "There are ten deadly errors which make most empty-handed martial arts techniques against a knife ineffective. The principle error stems from the fact that few present-day martial systems teach the blade. The premise of this article is that to effectively defend against a knife,you need to know how to use one. The purpose of this article is to motivate martial arts instructors to analyze more critically thier unarmed knife defense techniques based on a clear understanding of the use of the knife, and to reawaken interest in the blade arts in the martial arts community."

The Article's Top Ten Errors...

1. Not knowing how to fight with a blade.
2. Improper Mind-set and lack of Blade Awareness
3. Incorrect Structure
4. Blocking
5. Kicking
6. Permitting Gaps Between You and the Attacker
7. Using Techniques Designed for Unarmed Adversaries
8. Ignoring the Adversary's Checking Hand
9. Failing to Follow-up
10. Unrealistic Training.

After careful study of the authors reasons I came to the conclusion that unless we revamped our practice to include serious and consistant study of the tanto that my students would be better off going to someone like Mr. McCurry to learn about knife fighting rather that suffer the perhaps fatal delusion that they are properly trained to handle someone with a knife. I sure hope Mr. McCurry's practice gains wider interest within our community."

Could not find the original link.LOL

William Hazen

Okami
07-19-2007, 11:32 AM
Hello all, I see you are having a nice conversation, but as so many others go I don't quite understand the things said. As far as I know all of you train in Aikido, but do you really train in Aikido? I know that the philopshy isn't for everyone, but O'sensei made this art to deal with any form of attack, don't forget he trained in a least like ten arts I think, some many including sword arts. So a tanto and wakazashi were more than likely implemented. And besides, what kind of question is Aikido work in a fight? Does anything work in a fight? Of course it does, but you're talking like someone from karate, Aikido is not force on force, Aikido harmonizes, but remember, as O'sensei said, how can you hope to harmonize with attackers if you have not first harmonized with yourself?

Aikibu
07-19-2007, 01:40 PM
Hello all, I see you are having a nice conversation, but as so many others go I don't quite understand the things said. As far as I know all of you train in Aikido, but do you really train in Aikido? I know that the philopshy isn't for everyone, but O'sensei made this art to deal with any form of attack, don't forget he trained in a least like ten arts I think, some many including sword arts. So a tanto and wakazashi were more than likely implemented. And besides, what kind of question is Aikido work in a fight? Does anything work in a fight? Of course it does, but you're talking like someone from karate, Aikido is not force on force, Aikido harmonizes, but remember, as O'sensei said, how can you hope to harmonize with attackers if you have not first harmonized with yourself?

With all due respect...

Your understanding of Aikido... it's history... and technique...needs further study... and... hard practice on your part. It's true that Aikido can be all the things you've mentioned and much more...

Most of us here are onto the 'much more" part. :)

Comparing your "insides" to our "outsides" is one of the first waystations one reaches on thier journey along the "path". Don't dally for too long. :)

William Hazen

dalen7
07-19-2007, 02:48 PM
Do you believe that this NEVER happens? I saw two hobos doing this very thing once.
Yeah, I tend to agree...if I had not trained, the few days I have, I probably would be the type of guy to lunge out...it seems to many people get used to 'proper' fighting techniques and forget that so many people that will fight, might not have a technique or watch enough video games and movies to know the difference.

Also, today we did both lunge and close range with 'tanto'.
Some interesting stuff which actually seems effective...again, effective depends on the situation and who is involved. ;)

Peace

Dalen

ChrisHein
07-19-2007, 07:50 PM
William,

Hard to agree, and hard to disagree with that.

Hard for me to agree, because I think the theory of Aikido works nicely with knife fighting, in fact all weapon fighting. Hard for me to disagree, because I know that fighting is more then theory.

I believe that the theory and technical syllabus of Aikido is better then the theory and technical syllabus that Mr. MacYoung suggests, that's why I said what I did. Most people who discuss knife, fighting, or really martial arts at large are just discussing theory.

Now putting theory into application is another matter. I believe the types of training that most Aikidoka are doing today is not enough to drastically help them in an actual knife confrontation. But I believe the information is there in the system of Aikido.

Aikibu
07-20-2007, 01:02 AM
William,

Hard to agree, and hard to disagree with that.

Hard for me to agree, because I think the theory of Aikido works nicely with knife fighting, in fact all weapon fighting. Hard for me to disagree, because I know that fighting is more then theory.

I believe that the theory and technical syllabus of Aikido is better then the theory and technical syllabus that Mr. MacYoung suggests, that's why I said what I did. Most people who discuss knife, fighting, or really martial arts at large are just discussing theory.

Now putting theory into application is another matter. I believe the types of training that most Aikidoka are doing today is not enough to drastically help them in an actual knife confrontation. But I believe the information is there in the system of Aikido.

It's cool. One of the reasons I picked the style of Aikido I practice is Shoji Nishio's comment that in order for Aikido to be considered a Martial Art (Budo) it must measure it's effectivness against other Martial Arts otherwise it's just dancing. I love discussions of theory... However sooner or later one must test one's hypothesis Oui? :)

We have various waza with regard to weapon " take away defense" All Mr MuCurry strongly suggests is that the training be realistic and pragmatic. As Our Scottish Friend suggested the best thing to do is avoid any confrontation with a knife fighter along the same lines as avoid trying to outbox a boxer. Having been there and done that and as skilled and experianced as I think I am (LOL!!!) I count my blessings in this regard. I have never had to face a real knife fighter unarmed with a serious intent to do me harm. :) There is always been something nearby to even the odds thank God.LOL

I have been training in gun and knife take aways for a very long time since before I joined the service and honestly 90% of the "tanto" waza I see is too easily glossed over with the participents making the dangerous assumption that the technique will always work or covers all the basic principles of defense against Edged Weapons.

Frankly I think most of the Koryu Arts have far superior "Weapon Waza" as they are true Combat Arts. Perhaps Aikidoka such as myself should focus on this a little bit more in order to preserve the Budo in Aikido. I am blessed with the fact that 100% of our practice is done with edged weapons in mind and spirit. :)

Take Care Chris. :)

William Hazen

ChrisHein
07-20-2007, 11:08 AM
Nice post William!

There is a big problem with people mistaking theory for application. Just like you said in your post:

"of the "tanto" waza I see is too easily glossed over with the participants making the dangerous assumption that the technique will always work or covers all the basic principles of defense against Edged Weapons."

The first time I told some of my students "hey we're going to do tanto dori, but the guy with the knife isn't going to fall down, he's going to resist you, and if he can he's going to switch knife hands" they were cut to ribbons.

The form is just the form. It has lots of good answers to the situations that arise in weapons conflict. However the form (no form Aikido or any other martial art system) can address the reality of an actual confrontation.

So I would say it doesn't matter what system you study, the forms are just the forms. They have some answers, but they are not training you for an actual situation where another person is trying to stop, or kill you.

Personally I think Aikido's forms are great. If you take them for what they are (forms just forms) they are quite complete, and nicely put together. The real training happens outside of the forms though. With someone actively working against your technique, and spontaneously trying different things on you. This is when you can study the real beauty of our system, and learn how magnificent Aiki really is!

Aiki Liu
07-21-2007, 12:45 AM
Two stories here which may be of interest as regards the above thread.
Firstly regarding the standard tanto strike we use in Aikido - ie lunging forward with the knife. When I used to work as a butcher on at least 3 seperate occasions I saw people give themselves "butchers cuts". This is when someone cuts meat in a sawing type motion and the knife hits bone unexpectedly. What tends to happen is the knife stops moving but the hand doesnt - ie your hand slides down the blade of the knife slicing it open. Its a pretty nasty cut (one guy lost the feeling in his hand) and - dependant on the target area, if you actually used a knife as we do in practice on a person (aiming for around the breastbone and holding it like a sword with one hand) youd be pretty likely to slice your own hand open. Obviously if you aim for the soft, squishy stomach etc then no problems, but there are far better ways of holding a knife which brings me neatly to point 2.
I have the unfortunate distinction of meeting a knife fighter in a confrontation. I wont go into too much detail but I got into a fight with a tramp (very James Bond, I know) and he indicated that he had a knife so, of course, I said the same (even though I didnt have one). He then proceeded to strip off his jacket and wrap it round his left forearm then pulled out a knife which he held point down with his forefinger over the base of the handle. When I saw this I knew this guy was actually USED to knifefighting - the protected arm for parrying blows and what I consider to be a very effective way of holding the blade for slashing down into the opponent.
For fear of the inevitable moral judgement Ill get, I wont go into detail as to how I got away but when I did - I ran like hell in the opposite direction. A guy like this who really knows what hes doing and takes such an effective stance would slash any unarmed martial artist to ribbons I reckon.

Anjisan
07-22-2007, 04:00 PM
When it is said that it is helpful in training for knife defence if one understands the blade from an attackers perspective, I see a direct parallel with regard to empty hand attacks within Aikido. Specifically, once one goes outside the traditional attacks that really seem designed to demonstrate channeling energy flow and establishing connection there can be a "ceiling" or a plateau that can be quickly reached as far as transitioning from form to practical application because so many Aikidoka have never trained in striking arts. Further, it can be a challenge for many to establish the "attacker" state of mind just like one would also need for knife training. Certainly, when I was training in karate or BJJ that issue never really came up, if anything you had to be mindful to reign people in.

Luc X Saroufim
07-23-2007, 09:40 PM
i would run if confronted with a knife. if i see i cannot outrun him, then i would choose to fight. at least that's my contingency plan, who knows how it would work out. as it stands, however, i would not fight an armed man empty handed.

Christopher Gee
07-24-2007, 03:15 AM
William has made the strongest point here.

I started my journey in Aikido in 'Ki Aikido', as my ideas on what 'Aikido to me' should be I have moved on. I would say now that I have two great teachers, non of which affiliate to any of the big names.

What I will say is that training in iaido is probably one of the biggest jumps I've made in understanding. Aikido, I believe, needs to go back to its roots. Koryu arts are the obvious port of call for training methods. As the writers in Diane Skoss’s book and Toby Threadgills article would suggest, in a real fighting situation we need to deal with psycho chemical stress (PSC). This causes a tunnelling of vision and a reduction in hearing and motor function. How do we over come this, well, Sensei Threadgills article would be a start, secondly, bokken and iaito training is awesome for developing zanshin. Thirdly... and this pains me, the shodothugs are correct, we need to fight. 'Practice fighting' of course but we need to fight. In your training, you have to build up the pressure placed on the shite by ukete in anyway that you can.

Ultimately if your training goals are different, then PCS is not important. But if, as aikidoka, we CLAIM self-defence then our students should know how to defend. The reality is that arts like BJJ, Boxing etc don’t have superior techniques, what they do have are better methods of allowing their students to deal with the stress of being attacked, for real, with little or no holding back. Some of you may think 'well my attacks are real', but at the end of the day if those real attacks occur in prescribed kata then really you are just learning the shape of the techniques, not application. Kata training IMHO should be about 60-70% of what we do. But that other percentages need to be developing the mind to deal with the stress of someone wanting to stab you.

So in answer to the original post, one cannot simply 'just' twist an arm. Chances are that you've been stabbed, if not, they will pull the arm back and stab you again. That’s why 'safe' realism is so important in the dojo.

Osu

Janet Rosen
07-24-2007, 11:18 AM
I will echo Chris' posts above by recalling an aikido-l seminar a few yrs back where one session was people doing knife attacks w/ water based magic markers and allowed to go outside usual tanto-tori waza to do hand changes, etc, and the unarmed person was free to try any reversals, etc. I don't think anybody came out without significant "damage", it was a real wake up call for many.

Basia Halliop
07-24-2007, 05:29 PM
Janet, that sounds like a cool exercise!

jennifer paige smith
07-24-2007, 07:02 PM
Janet, that sounds like a cool exercise!

Yeah, that does sound like a great exercise. We do a similar practice with white chalk and black clothing in my high-school classes. We also do 'free form' attacks where I hand students tanto and have them use them on each other. Different street styles emerge in this context and then we work on what the students are interested in learning or have brought to class, always emphasizing aikido philosophy and technique. It is always an eye-opener and a great practice.

ChrisHein
07-24-2007, 07:07 PM
Go to a fabric store and buy some velcro strips. Separate the two sides and take the side that is cloth and soft , the loop side (not the hard prickly plastic hook side). Glue it to the edge of a wooden tanto, and apply marking chalk (like found at a lumber yard). This is a great cheep way to make a very durable marking knife.

jennifer paige smith
07-24-2007, 07:32 PM
Go to a fabric store and buy some velcro strips. Separate the two sides and take the side that is cloth and soft , the loop side (not the hard prickly plastic hook side). Glue it to the edge of a wooden tanto, and apply marking chalk (like found at a lumber yard). This is a great cheep way to make a very durable marking knife.

Very tricky, Mr. Bond. Very tricky.

Thanks for the suggestion,Chris! :)

Janet Rosen
07-25-2007, 12:17 AM
Great idea, Chris - makes for more realistic grips than a magic marker!

jennifer paige smith
07-29-2007, 12:23 PM
Now, what did I do with those arms again...? sigh....

ChrisHein
07-29-2007, 12:44 PM
It's hard to find a guy with no arms to practice your Aikido on...

jennifer paige smith
07-30-2007, 09:32 AM
If you can't beat em with no arms, join em.

www.popculturemadness.com/Trivia/No-Arms-No-Legs-Jokes.htm

Avery Jenkins
07-30-2007, 09:16 PM
For fear of the inevitable moral judgement Ill get, I wont go into detail as to how I got away but when I did - I ran like hell in the opposite direction.

That's exactly how I handled my first (and only) knife fight. Which is what eventually led me to learning aikido.

So, at this point, we've got two solid votes for the Runlikehell ryu. Both backed by real world experience.

Funny, how after an ungodly number of years training aikido, I end up at the same place I started...:cool:

ChrisHein
07-30-2007, 11:48 PM
I'm all for Runlikehell ryu when by my self. However it’s a horrible system when someone is stabbing your children or raping your wife. I prefer Armedtotheteeth ryu. It works well in all situations, particularly when backed up by a system like Aikido. Aikido teaches me to keep my weapon, and free it up when I’m grabbed.

Janet Rosen
07-31-2007, 04:47 AM
It's hard to find a guy with no arms to practice your Aikido on...
Actually I recall practicing w/ a fellow w/o arms yrs ago when visiting Ki Society of Virginia. His kokyudosa was wicked - the guy was all center!!!