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View Full Version : *Tentative* dates for Akuzawa (Aunkai) in Seattle, WA 11/3-11/4


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ChrisMoses
07-12-2007, 11:25 AM
Rob and I are still finalizing the details, but it looks VERY likely that we will be hosting Akuzawa Sensei of the Aunkai this November (3-4) here in Seattle, WA. Rob John will be accompanying him to assist with instruction and translation. For those of you who were able to attend the workshop Rob did for us earlier this year, this is a chance to reinforce what you learned and, quite frankly, get to see and feel Akuzawa (Ark) in person. This seminar will be open to practitioners of all styles/arts and levels, but will be limited to 40 participants. This is to ensure no one gets lost in the crowd, so everyone who attends will have the best opportunities to learn and feel this stuff. Please PM or email me (christianmoses (at) hotmail.com) if you are interested in attending. The seminar will *probably* be $190. We all realize this is a lot, and Ark has requested that we make a discounted student rate available, so PM me for details on that as well.

More when I know it! :) I'm really excited to be able to host Ark here in Seattle, and encourage you to take advantage of this. It is no exaggeration to say that the two hours that I spent with him in Tokyo last October changed the way I approached my training on a fundamental level, and not a class goes by that I don't find some new way to apply what little I've learned from him and Rob.

HL1978
07-12-2007, 01:23 PM
I am glad to hear that you are able to get a seminar running.

Hopefully there will be something on the east coast.

David Orange
07-12-2007, 02:01 PM
I am glad to hear that you are able to get a seminar running.

Hopefully there will be something on the east coast.

It would probably make it a lot more cost effective for Ark.

SeiserL
07-12-2007, 02:30 PM
VA (Hunter), AL (David), and GA (me)?
Wonder what we can get going here in the south?

David Orange
07-12-2007, 02:52 PM
VA (Hunter), AL (David), and GA (me)?
Wonder what we can get going here in the south?

Hey, it's gotta be cheaper than going to Japan! Mark Murray's in VA also.

David Orange
07-12-2007, 03:25 PM
Hey, it's gotta be cheaper than going to Japan! Mark Murray's in VA also.

Actually, those dates are pretty close to when I'm supposed to be visiting Dan in Boston. I probably won't be able to make an Aunkai seminar at that time.

Sorry.

David

Mike Sigman
07-12-2007, 04:30 PM
The seminar will *probably* be $190. We all realize this is a lot, Actually, it's a little below average for a good teacher coming from Asia. In fact, it's sort of a deal. In terms of internal strength, information is extremely hard to get and some people go 20 and 30 years without getting any (or just getting the occasional bits and pieces), missing the boat entirely. Anyone that can save you time is saving you money and wasted years. 190 bucks for a good step in the right direction should be a good investment. (Note: I admittedly have not met Akuzawa, so my comments are general, about the cost of a good workshop).

Regards,

Mike Sigman

tarik
07-12-2007, 04:48 PM
Actually, it's a little below average for a good teacher coming from Asia. In fact, it's sort of a deal.

It's a totally reasonable umm.. steal. :)

Regards,

ChrisMoses
07-12-2007, 06:48 PM
Wow, great response from people on this, thanks!

I pm'd or emailed back to everyone who I heard from so far (email is preferred). I'm making a list for now and don't want to collect any money until things are finalized, hopefully that will be by the end of the month. At that time, if you're on the list you'll have the opportunity to pay and reserve your spot. If you're coming in from out of town and need a place to stay, let me know. We might be able to find a couch for you to surf for the weekend, otherwise once I know exactly where the facility is going to be I can make some recommendations for where to stay.

Thanks again, and please, if you PM me, include your email address so it's easier for me to keep you in the loop. :)

Adman
07-12-2007, 07:17 PM
Wonder what we can get going here in the south?

Heck ... what about America's heartland? Make it a country wide tour?

:D
Adam

ChrisMoses
08-23-2007, 03:35 PM
Bump...

OK, George Ledyard has been good enough to offer his dojo for the Akuzawa seminar, and the dates look firm for Nov 3-4. I just sent out some details to those who I have on my list. If you didn't hear from me, please shoot me an email at christianmoses(at)hotmail.com and I will add you to the list. Space is going to be limited to 40 people. I'm just waiting for the final confirmation from Rob and I'll begin collecting the seminar fees to guarantee peoples spots. I'm sure this is going to sell out, so if you're interested, please shoot me an email. All for now...

MM
08-23-2007, 04:13 PM
Bump...

OK, George Ledyard has been good enough to offer his dojo for the Akuzawa seminar, and the dates look firm for Nov 3-4. I just sent out some details to those who I have on my list. If you didn't hear from me, please shoot me an email at christianmoses(at)hotmail.com and I will add you to the list. Space is going to be limited to 40 people. I'm just waiting for the final confirmation from Rob and I'll begin collecting the seminar fees to guarantee peoples spots. I'm sure this is going to sell out, so if you're interested, please shoot me an email. All for now...

going to have to miss this one. :( Yuck. I could have met you, Akuzawa and Ledyard all in one seminar.

I'm already committed to a seminar in Portland the end of Sep. And I can't make two trips to the West Coast -- at least not this year.

Well, whoever does go, I hope you have a lot of fun. Maybe someone can post a writeup afterwards?

Mark

ChrisMoses
08-23-2007, 08:31 PM
Maybe someone can post a writeup afterwards?

Mark

NO! Is all super-secret squirrel technique... ;) No seminar, no decoder ring.

Kevin Leavitt
08-23-2007, 08:39 PM
Hi guys, I am now back in Virginia area! I am sure we could generate enough people to make it worthwile and reasonable. $190 is not that much really for this level of instruction.

Walker
08-24-2007, 12:10 AM
Three cheers for George. Eastside is a much nicer venue -- no barf hashes on the walls. :yuck:

...I know... no fight club cred for me. :sorry:



Jeez Chris, EVERYONE knows the squirrel technique is wrapping with duct tape. :eek:

Ron Tisdale
08-24-2007, 07:38 AM
Marking this on my calendar now...I'm going to try to make it. Fall is probably going to be tough for me, but we'll give it the college try. George hosting the seminar is the last straw! :D Just can't miss it...

Best,
Ron

Jeremy Hulley
08-24-2007, 10:04 AM
Ron,
Hope you can make it would love to meet you in person..

Ron Tisdale
08-24-2007, 10:06 AM
Ditto!
B,
R

Walker
08-24-2007, 10:10 AM
Thritto! evileyes

ChrisMoses
08-24-2007, 10:57 AM
Quadrutto! :D

Budd
08-24-2007, 11:00 AM
Quintattro!! Oh, wait, heck . . . I won't be able to make it :(

Dammit, y'all have fun without me . . . one of these days . .

TomW
08-24-2007, 03:34 PM
Quadrutto! :D

Yeah, What Chris said!

Two times! Wait, that's a lot of times, octo something:crazy:

ChrisMoses
08-28-2007, 10:09 AM
Just sent out another email with details on how to pay for/reserve your spot at the seminar. If you thought you were confirmed for the seminar but do not get this email please check your bulk mail/spam folder. If nothing's there, shoot me an email.

Seminar fee has been dropped to $180 at Ark's request and a student rate is available, contact me for details. There are still a couple (literally) spots available, so please email me if you're interested in attending this super-cool event.

HL1978
08-29-2007, 09:05 AM
id like to get in if possible, emailed you last night

ChrisMoses
08-29-2007, 09:30 AM
id like to get in if possible, emailed you last night

PM'd ya...

ChrisMoses
08-30-2007, 02:37 PM
OK, at this point the seminar is basically full. I'm giving those people who expressed an early interest in the seminar some time (a week or so) to pay for and reserve their spot. If you are interested and haven't told me yet, please email me and I will add you to the wait list. If someone backs out, I will give those on the wait list a chance to reserve a spot based on when they emailed me.

HL1978
10-18-2007, 07:55 AM
who all is making it? I will be there and look forward to meeting you all.

Jeremy Hulley
10-18-2007, 10:49 AM
I'm there

ChrisMoses
10-18-2007, 12:01 PM
We have people coming in from all over the US and Canada! :D

Please let me know if you're interested in dinner on Saturday night with Ark and Rob. At this point it looks like it will be Chinese food, near Aikido Eastside. Probably $15/person, buy your own adult beverages.

I'm really looking forward to meeting all of you.

Josh Lerner
10-18-2007, 12:53 PM
I'll be there.

Josh

MM
10-18-2007, 01:07 PM
I'll be crying because I'm not there. Does that count? ;)

dbotari
10-18-2007, 03:21 PM
Chris,

I noticed on e-budo that an agenda was outlined for the seminar at Stamford. Do you know what the seminar agenda is for the Nov 3/4 weekend? I suspect it will be similar but thought I'd ask just in case.

Thanks

Dan

ChrisMoses
10-18-2007, 03:30 PM
I suspect it will be the same/similar. Rob? What say you? :) And as a reminder, the seminar is scheduled 10-4 with a break for lunch. It's possible things might run a bit late, so keep that in mind.

Upyu
10-18-2007, 08:17 PM
Chris,

I noticed on e-budo that an agenda was outlined for the seminar at Stamford. Do you know what the seminar agenda is for the Nov 3/4 weekend? I suspect it will be similar but thought I'd ask just in case.

Thanks

Dan

Hi Dan,

Yes the agenda will be the same as the one for Stanford :)

Rob

Lee Salzman
10-18-2007, 10:16 PM
who all is making it? I will be there and look forward to meeting you all.

I'll be there.

Thomas Campbell
10-20-2007, 08:09 PM
I'll be there.

Josh

"Just call my name, and . . . " :D

ChrisMoses
10-22-2007, 11:25 AM
I can't get to hotmail for some reason today, so I'll just post this here. Dinner on Saturday night is being scheduled for a Chinese restaurant not too far from George's dojo. We're planning to do a set menu and it will probably be around $15/person. Additional details to follow. If you want to attend the dinner, be sure to let me know ahead of time and bring *cash* to the seminar on Saturday. Thanks!

ChrisMoses
10-31-2007, 10:11 AM
Dinner's scheduled (thanks Geoff!), please bring $20 to the seminar on Saturday if you plan to attend. $20 will be easier to collect and will ensure that we cover dinner + tip + Ark-n-Rob. Thanks everybody!

We're all looking forward to this thing and I really appreciate all of the interest/support from those of you traveling to attend this. Should be a blast. :D

mikeym
11-02-2007, 12:06 AM
If you are really interested but you can't make it to the Seattle seminar, we still have a few spots open in the Northern California seminar. All the information is here:

http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13393 (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13393)

- Mike

Thomas Campbell
11-03-2007, 11:36 PM
For those who are still undecided about the Northern California seminar that Mike posted about, I would heartily recommend going. The first day of the Seattle seminar was great. Akuzawa Minoru is a skilled, down-to-earth, open and funny teacher. Rob John did a superlative job translating, demonstrating, correcting and coaching. The exercises, while difficult, are doable and make eminently good sense within the paradigm that Akuzawa presents them. You have all of that to look forward to in what was one of the best MA seminars I've had the pleasure of attending.

George Ledyard generously made his beautiful dojo available for this event. It was well-organized--thanks to Chris Moses--and well-attended by local folks. We had several people come in from out of town--including Ron Tisdale from Philly and Lee Salzman from the place where what happens there stays there.

Aunkai training distills elements from a variety of martial arts into a few core principles and some well-conceived exercises that will return real benefits in manifold proportion to the effort put into training. It's been helpful in strengthening my own back after sustaining crushed vertebrae and torn ligaments several months ago. I'll let other more skilled martial artists comment on the effect of the training on their conditioning and movement.

Thanks Ark, Rob, Chris, and everyone else who helped pull this event together.

cheers,

Tom

Gernot Hassenpflug
11-04-2007, 07:01 PM
Hey! Don't treat Ark too well, or he may decide to move over there permanently :-) Good to hear the seminar is well-received---not that there are any doubts about "capability" LOL

George S. Ledyard
11-04-2007, 10:48 PM
For those who are still undecided about the Northern California seminar that Mike posted about, I would heartily recommend going. The first day of the Seattle seminar was great. Akuzawa Minoru is a skilled, down-to-earth, open and funny teacher. Rob John did a superlative job translating, demonstrating, correcting and coaching. The exercises, while difficult, are doable and make eminently good sense within the paradigm that Akuzawa presents them. You have all of that to look forward to in what was one of the best MA seminars I've had the pleasure of attending.

George Ledyard generously made his beautiful dojo available for this event. It was well-organized--thanks to Chris Moses--and well-attended by local folks. We had several people come in from out of town--including Ron Tisdale from Philly and Lee Salzman from the place where what happens there stays there.

Aunkai training distills elements from a variety of martial arts into a few core principles and some well-conceived exercises that will return real benefits in manifold proportion to the effort put into training. It's been helpful in strengthening my own back after sustaining crushed vertebrae and torn ligaments several months ago. I'll let other more skilled martial artists comment on the effect of the training on their conditioning and movement.

Thanks Ark, Rob, Chris, and everyone else who helped pull this event together.

cheers,

Tom

This event was top notch. I was only sorry that my battered old knee wasn't able to go the distance each day. A fantastic amount of great information about proper body alignment and power. I have to say, much like doing a Systema workshop, the exercises made me think of Mr T in Rocky when he said "P-A-I-N"... I think I would need a structured group workout to do these regularly with discipline... too easy to wimp out when you are on your own. A bit of peer pressure is helpful. But even after one weekend, I can feel my body making some subtle changes. I can only imagine what might be possible if one really pursued this training seriously.

The great thing about this training is that it is cross-style... no one would benefit from doing this work, regardless of style!

Thanks to Chris and company for making this happen. Rob, you were extremely helpful, thank you. Please thank Akuzawa Sensei again from me for his wonderful instruction!

MM
11-05-2007, 07:21 AM
This event was top notch. I was only sorry that my battered old knee wasn't able to go the distance each day. A fantastic amount of great information about proper body alignment and power. I have to say, much like doing a Systema workshop, the exercises made me think of Mr T in Rocky when he said "P-A-I-N"... I think I would need a structured group workout to do these regularly with discipline... too easy to wimp out when you are on your own. A bit of peer pressure is helpful.


Yes, I completely agree. :) It's just too darned easy to *not* do these exercises.


But even after one weekend, I can feel my body making some subtle changes. I can only imagine what might be possible if one really pursued this training seriously.

The great thing about this training is that it is cross-style... no one would benefit from doing this work, regardless of style!


Um, not sure about the last sentence? Should it have been "anyone would benefit"?

Mark

ChrisMoses
11-05-2007, 08:15 AM
Wow! Did you know it's REALLY exciting to get down a flight of stairs first thing in the morning with quads that don't work? Well let me assure you, it is! :p

Thanks to everyone for attending and making this thing possible. Ark was all that I remembered from Japan, and it was interesting to get the chance to go over what I remembered from my visit there and Rob's workshop he did with us earlier this year.

I'd like to again thank Akuzawa Sensei and Rob for their clear and generous teaching, George Ledyard for the use of his dojo and everyone who helped out making this thing happen and flow smoothly. Special thanks to Geoff Ng from the TNBBC for coordinating dinner Saturday night and Joe Springrose of Aikido Eastside who spent long hours at the dojo every day making sure that it was open when people go there and closed when they left.

Please feel free to send me any comments or suggestions you would have for further seminars. It's my hope that we will be able to do this annualy.

George S. Ledyard
11-05-2007, 08:16 AM
The great thing about this training is that it is cross-style... no one would benefit from doing this work, regardless of style!


Correction:
"The great thing about this training is that it is cross-style... no one would fail to benefit from doing this work, regardless of style!"

Thanks to the folks that caught this... shouldn't write when I am tired.
- George

Ron Tisdale
11-05-2007, 09:15 AM
Anyone who is serious about expanding their training, looking for solo training exercises, looking to add to conditioning for an aging body should get to one of these seminars. Best thing I've done.

Thanks to our host, George, Chris Moses for setting it up, and the Aunkai for coming, teaching and supporting us.

I was especially glad to meet Neil Yamamoto and Alan Beebe...and to feel them and their guys. Anyone who had questions about their level of exposure to this stuff...the question has been answered for me.

Best to all,
Ron Tisdale (here's hoping for an east coast refresher!)

Josh Lerner
11-05-2007, 09:59 AM
I'll add my thanks to everyone also - Akuzawa sensei, Rob, Ledyard sensei, Chris, and all members of the supporting cast. It means alot to be able to have the opportunity to get exposed to teachings and teachers like this, and I really appreciate the effort that everyone put into it to make it possible. I also realized that as easy as it is to deplore the effect of the internet on modern culture in general and martial arts in particular, if it wasn't for Rob so dextrously stirring up trouble here and there over the last few years, none of us would have had the chance to meet him and Ark.

Also, as someone who trains taijutsu almost entirely solo these days, it was a fantastic opportunity to have so many training partners with such varied backgrounds and strong drives to learn and practice. It was also great to have "Oh, so *you're* that guy who posts on Aikiweb" experiences over and over. Literally every time I met someone.

Josh

Thomas Campbell
11-05-2007, 11:09 AM
[snip]It was also great to have "Oh, so *you're* that guy who posts on Aikiweb" experiences over and over. Literally every time I met someone.

Josh

Ohhh . . . so you're THAT Josh.

;)

Allen Beebe
11-05-2007, 12:43 PM
A BIG thank you to Akuzawa sensei and Rob for another memorable experience :uch: :D . I is a pleasure training under someone who is at once capable and sincere, humble and humorous. Rob, you performed the formidable tasks of interpreter, assistant, teacher, demonstrator/demonstratee and international face of Aunkai in the relaxed, seemingly effortless manner that we've come to take for granted. As I said before, this seminar with your sensei Akuzawa served to highlight the skill and comprehensiveness with which you taught the first seminar. To my mind, you do yourself proud and represent your teacher well. Thanks to Chris and Co. for putting this together. It seemed to go without a hitch again. May there be many more! Thanks to George and Co. for their typical graciousness. And finally, thanks to all my brothers and sisters in pain and sweat. Having such a pleasant bunch of inmates helped the medicine go down . . . and down a little farther . . . a little more . . . :eek: :crazy: :dead:

It was nice meeting you too Ron. It is nice to find that you are as much a gentleman in person as you are on the the boards!

OK, back to my ibuprofen and coffee . . .

Mike Sigman
11-05-2007, 01:00 PM
Sounds like a great time was had by all, etc. So, would someone put into words what it is they learned, what it does, how it will affect their Aikido, etc.? The most substance I've gotten so far is the sore quadriceps comment and I have to nod and agree that sore quads is a good thing for all martial arts! ;) Of course, detailed expositions are difficult (if not impossible) to make about what was learned, but surely a few general categories can be made? Just formulating these ideas and then having to articulate (in as few words as possible) will help your own thinking/analysing process, I'll bet.

Regards,

Mike Sigman

Jeremy Hulley
11-05-2007, 01:22 PM
I'll ditto all the thank yous: George, Rob, Akuzawa Sensei, Chris and Geoff. Nice to meet some folks and deepen my practice some more.

Two things that I took away; I've been using too much arm tension while doing mabu. When I settled through my back more I start the feel the connection though the back to the pelvic girdle.

Another is that I;ve been focusing too much on opening the pelvic girdle without "sitting" in it. Ark and Rob corrected me a few times and I felt as if I was understanding better by the end of the weekend.

Thank so much again to Rob, Nori and Akuzawa sensei for their time and efforts.

Best
Jeremy

Franco
11-05-2007, 03:10 PM
I have much thinking to do about the seminar. Akuzawa taught some exercises that are aimed at creating connection in the body. Most of them were quite painful. No, actually all of them were quite painful. One of the ideas was related to creating opposing tensions in the body, like in "heaven and earth" and shiko. There was also the concept of keeping your "upper cross" and back intact while kicking or walking. What I do know is that my poor attempts at applying joint locks on Akuzawa were completely fruitless. He just stood there saying "harder!". And his kick sent me backwards about 10 feet.

Now I have to start doing the exercises daily. Ouch.

Mike Sigman
11-05-2007, 03:19 PM
my poor attempts at applying joint locks on Akuzawa were completely fruitless. He just stood there saying "harder!". And his kick sent me backwards about 10 feet.

Now I have to start doing the exercises daily. Ouch.So analyse it. What did he do that thwarted your joint locks? How did it feel? What did you learn from that? Maybe is kicking you was just a version of the same basic power that thwarted your joint locks? Approach it like a scientist. ;)

Best.

Mike

David Orange
11-05-2007, 03:22 PM
This event was top notch. I was only sorry that my battered old knee wasn't able to go the distance each day. A fantastic amount of great information about proper body alignment and power. I have to say, much like doing a Systema workshop, the exercises made me think of Mr T in Rocky when he said "P-A-I-N"...

Ledyard Sensei,

Could you comment on the feel of Akuzawa-sama's technique since you have mentioned your encounter with Mike Sigman (sama)?

Did you find the experiences similar at all, very similar, completely different?

Could you comment as to how their approaches relate (at least from your perspective)? And if you've met Dan Harden (sama), could you add him to the comparisons?

In other words, do you feel like they are really all doing something very related or that they're each doing something really substantially different in approach and/or effect?

Best wishes.

David

Thomas Campbell
11-05-2007, 04:04 PM
Ledyard Sensei,

Could you comment on the feel of Akuzawa-sama's technique since you have mentioned your encounter with Mike Sigman (sama)?

Did you find the experiences similar at all, very similar, completely different?

Could you comment as to how their approaches relate (at least from your perspective)? And if you've met Dan Harden (sama), could you add him to the comparisons?
[snip]

Ark, Mike and Dan . . . the Sama Brothers. :p

Franco
11-05-2007, 04:06 PM
Mike:

Well, when I tried to put a joint lock on him, it felt like his whole body, instead of being a collection of bones, muscles, tendons, and ligaments, was one single mass of tissue. STRONG tissue. You and others talk about "fascia", so that must be what it is. While I was trying a kote-gaeshi, he explained (Rob translated) that he was directing my pressure to his center through some lines, although I can't say I actually understand the meaning of "inside lines", "outside lines", etc.

Regarding his kick, somebody asked me what it felt like, and honestly all I can say is that it felt like being hit by a truck. I don't want to know what his kicks feel like when his back doesn't hurt. Yikes.

Mike Sigman
11-05-2007, 04:18 PM
Well, when I tried to put a joint lock on him, it felt like his whole body, instead of being a collection of bones, muscles, tendons, and ligaments, was one single mass of tissue. STRONG tissue. You and others talk about "fascia", so that must be what it is. While I was trying a kote-gaeshi, he explained (Rob translated) that he was directing my pressure to his center through some lines, although I can't say I actually understand the meaning of "inside lines", "outside lines", etc.[/quotes] Sounds like the "groundpath" idea that Rob and I have talked about before. The path may go to his center, but his center has a direct line to the ground through his leg. So basically, instead of reacting locally to your joint-lock, he let the ground handle your joint-lock. [quote]Regarding his kick, somebody asked me what it felt like, and honestly all I can say is that it felt like being hit by a truck. I don't want to know what his kicks feel like when his back doesn't hurt. Yikes.Maybe he kicked you with the ground? Of course the body has to be trained to convey/conduct the ground, so you have to do exercises which train the body to do that.

Best.

Mike

Mike Sigman
11-05-2007, 04:19 PM
Ark, Mike and Dan . . . the Sama Brothers. :pBetter than being the Ko Sisters, I guess. ;)

Timothy WK
11-05-2007, 04:40 PM
While I was trying a kote-gaeshi, he explained (Rob translated) that he was directing my pressure to his center through some lines, although I can't say I actually understand the meaning of "inside lines", "outside lines", etc.
Heh, this is one of the "secrets". As you develop internal connection/ lines/ tensions, you'll learn that when one part of your body is moved, you can (literally) feel a pull in other parts of your body.

As you continue working on Ark's exercises, every now and again have someone put a kote-gaeshi/ nikkyo/ etc on you (or practice the locks on yourself). Have them apply pressure real slow and gentle, so you feel more of a stretch than a lock. Stay real relaxed and pay attention to how it feels. Where do you feel the stretch? How far can you extend that stretch? Can you feel it in your forearms? What about your upper arms? What about your body?

When you get to the point where you can feel the stretch in your body, you'll really be able to start resisting the pressure like Ark did. (At least, that's what was been told to me, I'm not there yet.) Part of this is a mind trick, but a lot of it is simply developing those internal lines/ connections/ tensions.

John Connolly
11-05-2007, 04:40 PM
Long time lurker, first time poster…

Thanks to Rob, Nori, Hunter, and of course Akuzawa Sensei. Thank you, Chris for getting Ark here and providing this great opportunity. Thanks to George Ledyard and Joe Springrose for the use of the Aikido Eastside dojo, and for Geoff of the TNBBC for being registration guy even with a bum ankle (I hope the healing process is going well!).

Our little basement-troll workout group, the TNBBC (Icho Ryu), had Rob out here for a seminar about a year ago, and we have been working on the exercises continuously since then (actually earlier, when Chris and Jeremy came back from Tokyo, jazzed about the Aunkai methods). I have noticed that my own structure has improved significantly during that time, and I am able to impart force more directly into Uke, while maintaining my own structure and connection to the ground. However, I have a looooong way to go. I realized during this session with Akuzawa Sensei and Rob, with their helpful adjustments of my frame, that I was not correctly seated in the kua, causing stress on my lower back and quads. This adjustment is very valuable to me (and frankly was the only reason I was able to continue the seminar into the second day). There were many other “Ah HA!” moments when I noticed I was “off” just a bit, and I am beginning to get a better idea of what I am supposed to be doing in these exercises. I look forward to hard practice and sharing notes with my comrades (and hopefully another seminar in the future!).

Ark was amazing and inspiring. He and his crew took a lot of time to explain precise ideas about form and the intent of the exercises. Ark was friendly and helpful, and with Rob’s interpretation help provided excellent answers to all queries. When Rob was not available, Ark was still able to show by example, by feel, or by correction, and it was extremely valuable to get that kind of instruction. Rob was excellent, clear, humorous, and friendly as always, and is a testament to the Aunkai method and Ark’s teaching. Nori and Hunter were likewise very friendly and helpful to everyone and I was grateful for their presence (Nori was inspiring: a small woman with burly power).

What does Ark have that I don’t? I outweigh him by a good 40 lbs probably, and he was able to fling me about like a baby during a push hands exercise. It was so powerful and solid, yet so flowing that I had to laugh out loud at my own inability to stop it. From the times when I was able to feel his technique, resistance to an applied technique, or just a simple explanatory movement directly, he has incredible connection to the ground, but is immanently mobile. His frame building solo exercises over the years have made him what people refer to as “monkey-strong” or “cat-strong”. I have tussled with large, muscular guys, and the feeling is so different. I envision it as an elastic strength in the tendons, allowing for sudden, powerful movement or slow steady pressure. I believe his methods work, because Rob feels different (more powerful), just under a year after last I met him. Building these pathways and strengthening the frame is clearly worth all the effort.

Understanding that this kind of ability is out there makes me feel very humble, but also very excited at the prospect of training in this direction. It’s going to be an interesting journey of discovery. I am still absorbing and digesting all of the information (mind and body), so if I will leave descriptions of actual technique or terminology to others more prepared than myself.

The most important concept at the Aunkai seminar was imparted when Akuzawa Sensei was discussing his ideas of structure and connection. To paraphrase: Once you know what to feel for, what you want to affect in yourself and have identified these key ideas in the exercises, you can create your own exercises or adapt these concepts to other aspects of your physical nature and activities, so practice can be continuous and beneficial for your body type.

(Best Seminar Evar!)

Sincerely,

John Connolly

p.s. “Hi” to all the great guys n gals I met at the seminar and dinner, and thanks for enduring all those tough exercises along with me in such great humor and friendliness!

Ron Tisdale
11-05-2007, 04:50 PM
I've felt Dan and Rob, didn't really get to do a lot with Akuzawa Sensei...and I had to miss the 2nd day cause of work.

They feel like they use the same principles, the exercises they use are similar.

Good stuff...

David Orange
11-05-2007, 05:21 PM
Ark, Mike and Dan . . . the Sama Brothers. :p

My question is, "Are they really all doing basicall the same thing or is it....sama this and sama that?":D

David

David Orange
11-05-2007, 05:56 PM
While I was trying a kote-gaeshi, he explained (Rob translated) that he was directing my pressure to his center through some lines, although I can't say I actually understand the meaning of "inside lines", "outside lines", etc.

I have been exploring the "ten chi jin" exercise without guidance other than what I've read on the aunkai website. That's this form:

http://www.aunkai.net/eng/bujyutu/kiban.html

It's the second photograph, the subject stands with both hands raised, palms up, fingers pointing outward.

Try standing the same way, but turn the fingers inward instead of outward, palms still up.

Do you notice any difference? How would you describe that?

Best wishes.

David

ChrisMoses
11-05-2007, 08:09 PM
John summed up what was so good about the Aunkai methods in general and this seminar in particular extremely well. This just simply is very valuable stuff. It's not easy and it's not comfortable, but I *know* that I am a better martial artist today than I would have been if I hadn't stopped by their dojo a year ago. When I met my current teacher (Neil) my ability to understand and perform waza changed in a monumental way. Since then, I've been pretty generally underwhelmed whenever I would venture out into the seminar world or back into mainstream Aikido spheres. So when I met Rob and Ark and had to really step back and say, "Wow, there's something here." It was signifigant. To be honest, I was really nervous about the first workshop we hosted with Rob. After all, it had just been a couple hours while I was rather sick, jet lagged and in a foreign country. Was I just in an impressionable headspace? But after talking up their methods and hosting Rob's workshop (attended by a lot of folks whose opinion I really respect) I realized that memory was true. Getting this chance to see Ark again was extremely valuable. I had a number of things really some together for me (particularly on the second day) that I'm really looking forward to exploring further. (This was the first time I was able to feel the kind of kua-heel-palm connection that I did, where the strain literally comes off the quads and you almost feel the pressure of the mat in your palms. This was during the SLOW tenchijin exercise on day 2.)

Watching Ark bounce our 'little' Samoan Fritz around during Aiki-age was basically worth the price of admission, and I can still hear John's laughter at being bounced about during the exercise he mentions above.

As for what I learned and how I will apply it, I'll leave that to my journal and the coming weeks of class. It's too hard to mis-communicate and get lost in semantics on the forums. Futhermore, I really fell that I just need to do it and live in the results longer before I start trying to explain how to apply it. The methodology is such that it changes how you *are*, not how you do x-waza. It really is the kind of thing that you just have to go feel. Of coursel, after you feel it, you could buy the DVD... :D

Edit: Oi, Mark Gibbons, post your thoughts! You are in an excellent place to comment on how this feels and how valuable it might be. You also know what I felt like before I ever tried this stuff and we got to play a little at the workshop. ;)

KIT
11-05-2007, 08:11 PM
Dang! I had a prior commitment with a combatives seminar down here.

I really wanted to roll a bit with Ark, and see Rob again.

Would have liked to meet Ron Tisdale, as well, I am always interested in the reasonable point of view in your posts.

Sounds like there is a Seattle "study group" developing? I should make a point to drop in when I am up north, I know Neil is always game for a roll!

Josh - I'll show you the gun grappling in vehicle stuff we did if you'll show me the stuff you guys did with Ark......:cool:

Sounds like good training, sorry I missed it.

ChrisMoses
11-05-2007, 08:35 PM
Dang! I had a prior commitment with a combatives seminar down here.



Kit, sorry you missed it but glad to hear you are up and training again. Not to sound cliche, but we were all thinking of you after your, er, on the job injury...

Stop by anytime.

Note: appologies for all the typos in my earlier post, apparently all of my blood is still in my quads and not my brain... Narf...

Josh Lerner
11-05-2007, 08:41 PM
Dang! I had a prior commitment with a combatives seminar down here.

I really wanted to roll a bit with Ark, and see Rob again.

Would have liked to meet Ron Tisdale, as well, I am always interested in the reasonable point of view in your posts.

Sounds like there is a Seattle "study group" developing? I should make a point to drop in when I am up north, I know Neil is always game for a roll!

Josh - I'll show you the gun grappling in vehicle stuff we did if you'll show me the stuff you guys did with Ark......:cool:

Sounds like good training, sorry I missed it.

Meeting Ron was another highlight, actually. I could tell who he was when I heard him from across the dojo. "Wow, that has to be Ron Tisdale. He talks just like he posts."

And Neil and Chris' group is great to work out with - dedicated and serious. I've only been up there once, though, 'cuz Neil threw me out and told me not to come back until I had the good sense to either get a clue or, failing that, at least bring him some good Scotch.

You're on for the "gun fun for agonizing self-inflicted nerve stretch and muscle failure" trade. If you promise not to hurt me too bad, I promise to show you the things we did that will hurt really good.

Josh

KIT
11-05-2007, 09:19 PM
Kit, sorry you missed it but glad to hear you are up and training again. Not to sound cliche, but we were all thinking of you after your, er, on the job injury... .

Deepest thanks to all, then!

Josh - yer on!

Walker
11-06-2007, 12:13 AM
I don't really have time and shouldn't be posting, but...
What everyone else said and thank you to all especially Arkazawa sensei and Rob san.

One thing I really appreciate that hasn't been mentioned is that Arkazawa sensei brings a wide perspective of experience. He has had a lot of access in a bunch of different places and to a bunch of different sensei. That brings a dimension to the things he is talking about. I felt that as he enumerated various principles in his own way, I could make connections to what I have been taught and also have a feeling that those ideas were also held by various teachers and dojo whom Arkazawa respects. When you are struggling away, knowing you have company like that can be very comforting and inspiring.

Again great to see everyone.

Budd
11-06-2007, 05:47 AM
Great posts, fellas, please keep 'em coming :)

MM
11-06-2007, 07:42 AM
The methodology is such that it changes how you *are*, not how you do x-waza. It really is the kind of thing that you just have to go feel.


LOL, now you sound like Dan. ;)

Mark

dbotari
11-06-2007, 07:46 AM
I would also like to echo the thanks expressed to Ark, Rob and nori for their instruction and patience, Chris and joe for their efforts in keeping the seminar and events organized and George for hosting this event.

I, like Josh, also had many moments where I found myself connecting faces to names I'd read on this forum. I got a chance to meet many but not all. hopefully next time I'll get around to see/meet everyone.

This was my first hands on exposure to this "stuff" and understand better the comments "you have to feel it". The challenge going forward is to be disciplined enough to add these exercises to a daily routine. I think I'll focus on the "Stillness" exercises for a long while until they ar ingrained before trying to apply the principles using the "Movement" exercises.

Once again. Thanks to everyone involved in making the seminar a great event. I really enjoyed myself and met many great people. It was worth the flight from Toronto.

Thanks,

Dan

P.S. I echo Ron's call for an East Coast refresher seminar - maybe in the spring???

MM
11-06-2007, 07:46 AM
Yeah, sounds like a really great seminar. Wish I could have made it.

David Orange,
The exercises are easy to copy from video/text instruction. However, I've found that the exercises are not easy to *do correctly* from video/text instruction.

Agree with Ron. They all felt similar, to this beginner anyway. :)

Rob John,
Maybe when you get time, you can post highlights of what you did at the seminars for those of us who weren't there, but know some of what you're doing?

Hope to meet everyone one of these days,
Mark

Ron Tisdale
11-06-2007, 07:55 AM
Kit, you were missed! Get back soon and hook up at a seminar with Ark, it will be worth it!

Thanks to all for the kind words...

B,
R

ChrisMoses
11-06-2007, 09:51 AM
I think I'll focus on the "Stillness" exercises for a long while until they ar ingrained before trying to apply the principles using the "Movement" exercises.



From my own experiences, I would encourage you to at least do the cross-training walking drill 'ashi-age' even from the very beginning. This drill seems to begin the transition to dynamic movement with body structure, and also serves to get blood moving through the legs, gently stretching many of the muscles that get really worked in the stillness exercises. (Note: by 'cross-training' I don't mean cross-discipline, but rather exercises that serve to build the 'cross' connection in the upper chest/back/spine.)

David Orange
11-06-2007, 10:25 AM
David Orange,
The exercises are easy to copy from video/text instruction. However, I've found that the exercises are not easy to *do correctly* from video/text instruction.

That's why I say I am "exploring" them. I understand that I need to meet Ark to really understand them.

However, I have noticed something and I wonder if it relates to what Ark is doing or not. As I posted earlier, in the tenchijin exercise, does anyone notice a difference if the fingers are turned inward (still palms up) instead of outward?

Best wishes.

David

ChrisMoses
11-06-2007, 10:32 AM
That's why I say I am "exploring" them. I understand that I need to meet Ark to really understand them.

However, I have noticed something and I wonder if it relates to what Ark is doing or not. As I posted earlier, in the tenchijin exercise, does anyone notice a difference if the fingers are turned inward (still palms up) instead of outward?

Best wishes.

David

There's a pretty significant difference. Further, you can get some very different sensations just based on how the palms/fingers are oriented even keeping the general shape in tact. Ark and Rob came around quite a bit and moved people's hands into position. The elbow shape (NO BEND!!!) is very important as well. After one of Ark's corrections to my hand shape/position and hip orientation, I was able to feel a different quality of connection in the exercise than I had previously (particularly the kua - heel connection/path). We're talking a correction of less than an inch in the pelvis area and a couple degrees of rotation to the hands/fingers and the results were dramatic.

Ron Tisdale
11-06-2007, 10:54 AM
I'm a complete noob and boob, but to me, any thing that leaves slack between the fingers along the path through the cross doesn't seem correct. A lot of these exercises seem to patially be about taking slack out of your body to stress the connections.

Do with that what you can...

Best,
Ron

David Orange
11-06-2007, 11:18 AM
There's a pretty significant difference. Further, you can get some very different sensations just based on how the palms/fingers are oriented even keeping the general shape in tact.

Actually, this relates to someone's earlier comment about "inside lines" and "outside lines" of energy.

What I experienced with the fingers pointed inward, toward each other, is that the feeling seems to go down the sides of my body, while, with fingers pointed outward, I feel it coming down into my body. I'm wondering if anyone has noticed that, if it relates to anything they're doing and especially if it relates to the "inside lines" of power and the "outside lines" of power.

Thanks and best to all.

David

TomW
11-06-2007, 11:42 AM
I want add my thanks to Chris, Rob, Akuzawa, George, and everyone who helped bring this together. What a great opportunity to reinforce the things Rob showed us in February and gain some new insight (or "infeeling") into the "cross training". I sure enjoyed training with everyone.

Ron, I hope we get a chance to train and talk over beers again soon.

TNBBC boys, always a pleasure.

Your brother in masochism:crazy: ,

ChrisMoses
11-06-2007, 01:44 PM
Neil has a nice write up of his experience of the Aunkai seminar over at his blog site. (http://tnbbc.blogspot.com/) :)

Steve Sakahara
11-06-2007, 03:09 PM
I didn't have problems walking down the stairs the next day. Pulling a shirt over my head when I couldn't lift my arms above my shoulders was another matter. :p

I'm complaining, make no mistake about it - my body was screaming at times this weekend. For the stillness exercises like tenchijin and mabu, I'm convinced there are gems and aha moments that only come out when you push your muscles to failure. (I so hope that Neil is not reading this...) I've imposed muscular structure on my body all these years and when the muscles are completely torched, I guess you have the opportunity to discover correct body structure. When your quads can no longer support your stance but you try again and discover you can continue by opening your kua and dropping into it? Or you can't lift your arms anymore, but find that by adjusting your upper back and shoulder position you're back in the class again?

Sometimes it's just finding that feeling or position once and then the goal is a tiny bit less elusive. So often this past year I've felt totally clueless. I really appreciate the beauty of Ark's training program - he hits the training from so many different angles that it's clear why his students get this stuff. And that's just based on the small part we got in a 2 day seminar.

The partner exercises are valuable if your partner gives you good feedback and you're really listening. There is a difference in using muscle vs. structure, but can you honestly accept that you can't do it because it's not just a tweak from what you do, but a totally different concept? Feeling tiny Nori's soft power and watching her handle the burly beasts. Working with Hunter and making subtle adjustments to make and feel the connection between the hand and the heel. Dealing with the mental hurdles...

Ark likes to demonstrate principles with the beefier guys. It was quite the visual to see Ark do shikko with Jeremy on his back until Jeremy choked him out. :o Then he picked up Chris and showed how to do shikko and then walk thru a resisting partner. Power that launched John and Fritz and had them laughing before they hit the ground. Franco doesn't have the bulk of these guys but he's strong and wiry - Ark's kick sent him flying back with a 'Kodak moment' look on his face. Ark moving at "regular" sparring speed, and then switching to demonstrably quicker movement from structure where waza just happens. whoa... :eek:

The movement exercises like ashiage and others help you transition body structure in stillness to movement. And to extend your range of movement while maintaining structure. After a day to digest things, I'm appreciative of all the undiscovered nuances of the training exercises. And this is just Aunkai lite...

Watching, listening and trying to absorb some of the Aunkai knowledge and perspective through the entire seminar had great value even if you couldn't do the exercises. Ark is expressive and communicates well despite the language barrier - Rob's value as a translator is incredibly understated. For both teacher and student, there's tremendous depth and knowledge and their ability to communicate other worldly concepts impressive.

I'll vouch for Tom's comment about these exercises helping one recover from back injuries, if appropriate for your type of injury. And yes John, you can impart force more directly into uke, so can you lighten up a bit when I'm on the airshield? :uch: And what a blast to meet and train with everybody. Thanks for the privilege.

It all tied together and it all was good. TNBBC will be fun tonight. Well, maybe not the 1st half, but the discussion period afterward will be something. :D

Steve

ChrisMoses
11-06-2007, 03:34 PM
Then he picked up Chris and showed how to do shikko and then walk thru a resisting partner. Power that launched John and Fritz and had them laughing before they hit the ground. Franco doesn't have the bulk of these guys but he's strong and wiry - Ark's kick sent him flying back with a 'Kodak moment' look on his face.

I think Steve just called me fat... :freaky:

HL1978
11-06-2007, 09:54 PM
I had a great time last weekend at the seminar and it was a pleasure putting the names to all the faces.

For me, it was interesting and educational to play with the various drills on a much wider variety of body types and sizes than I typically get to do. I also found it interesting to see how people were doing who had visited Ark in the past or had been doing drills from Rob's seminar back in Feburary.

One thing which was mentioned in the seminar, that I think is worth repeating is the use of the back. Akuzawa mentioned that most people are familiar with using the front of the body, but not so familiar with how to move various loads onto the back. Josh and I briefly experimented with this to replicate one of the demonstrations (and I was able to move the load a tiny bit, though I was in a position and loaded in such a way I am not normally familiar with), and it will be something I will be playing around with in the future to figure out how to do properly in addition to more regular training.

Akuzawa clearly and effectively demonstrated the difference between regular strength and internal movement, through both demonstration, hands on experience, and most importantly how to properly preform the various body training exercises. I also liked that the material was presented in such a way to make it clear that the same principles were applied for both grappling and striking.

I'm sure the Northern California seminar will be very educational as well.

Mark Jakabcsin
11-07-2007, 06:20 AM
I'm sure the Northern California seminar will be very educational as well.

How all is going to the N. CA seminar this weekend? I fly in Friday evening. If anyone needs a ride from the aiport let me know. I land about 7:30pm and will have a car for the weekend.

Take care,

Mark J.

Bronson
11-08-2007, 04:14 PM
So, when will a Mid-west/Chicago seminar happen?:D ?

Bronson

Yamazaru
11-08-2007, 08:48 PM
If anyone is having trouble deciding to go check out Akuzawa and Rob this weekend in Cali(or anywhere else he may end up), let me just add my voice to those telling you to get out there and check 'em out ASAP.

I came out to Seattle from Florida and the seminar was more than worth the trip- Ark's skill is the real deal, and it has to be felt firsthand to be truly appreciated. I've trained with people talking about "ground strength" and "lines in the body" before, but never have I felt someone who could demonstrate the effects of these principles as effortlessly as he could. His student Rob (besides having a really great name...ahem...) has "the stuff" as well, and both of them are excellent teachers both verbally and with hands-on corrections aplenty....It's great stuff that is rarely taught in such an open manner....heck, Ark even put up with my crappy Kansai-ben and annoying questions:D

Also, my thanks to Chris Moses for organizing the seminar and to George Ledyard for allowing us to be in that beautiful dojo of his...a great experience!!

Mark Gibbons
11-09-2007, 10:23 AM
That was a good seminar and my thanks to everyone. I had a couple areas to make comments on, but I’m not at all sure the comments are worth much. I have a hard time interpreting things outside of my aikido filters.

Chris asked if I could feel a difference in the year he’s been working on the aunkai methods. Well not so much with Chris, he was just a bit smoother. I never could tell what Chris was doing. Jeremy and I played on Wednesday nights for almost 2 years however. Jeremy moves better, quicker and more directly, very noticeable.

Overall the seminar methods and emphasis look and feel the same as some of the goals at the dojo I train at. The postural things, the ground connections, the internal paths, the frame, the position of the shoulder blades all seemed like things taught in aikido. We did an iriminage in class this week that when I look at it now I see it’s almost identical to the synchronized walking exercise we did at the seminar. I’m not really experienced enough, even after the seminar, to distinguish the subtle differences. The seminar seemed like going to a very highly qualified expert in these areas for very specialized instruction. The solo training exercises are much more systematic than what I’ve been exposed to. If they don’t help my aikido I’m very sure they will improve my skiing conditioning.

Regards,
Mark

ChrisMoses
11-09-2007, 11:17 AM
Thanks for the write up Mark!

dbotari
11-13-2007, 07:10 AM
Any feedback on the Northern California seminar this past weekend? How many attended? Did anyone besides Ark and entourage do both seminars?

Regards,

Dan

ChrisMoses
11-13-2007, 02:40 PM
Any feedback on the Northern California seminar this past weekend? How many attended? Did anyone besides Ark and entourage do both seminars?

Regards,

Dan

>tap< >tap< "Is this thing on?"

Charlie
11-13-2007, 03:11 PM
Actually, those dates are pretty close to when I'm supposed to be visiting Dan in Boston. I probably won't be able to make an Aunkai seminar at that time.

Sorry.

David

Didn't you go see Dan yourself recently? What does your report say?

Mark Kruger
11-13-2007, 04:41 PM
Any feedback on the Northern California seminar this past weekend? How many attended? Did anyone besides Ark and entourage do both seminars?

Regards,

Dan

No feedback... too busy training. :) I will write something up later on this evening. 24-25 people attended. I don't think anyone attended both seminars.

Respectfully,
Mark Kruger

David Orange
11-13-2007, 05:27 PM
Didn't you go see Dan yourself recently? What does your report say?

No, I haven't been out there yet. I didn't get a reply to my most recent e-mail. Either I've got the wrong address or it's one he doesn't check often.

But I am interested in a comparison of the major contributors to these threads. Howard Popkin hasn't said much on the subject, but as a representative of a major line of daito ryu, I'm wondering how similar his material seems to that represented by Dan. Howard is another one I want to meet. Time and money....

Also, I got this thread confused with the one about Howard Popkin's seminar in WV this past weekend....

Anyway....still want to see Dan in person....hoping for the spring....

Best wishes.

David

Upyu
11-13-2007, 06:57 PM
Actually, this relates to someone's earlier comment about "inside lines" and "outside lines" of energy.

What I experienced with the fingers pointed inward, toward each other, is that the feeling seems to go down the sides of my body, while, with fingers pointed outward, I feel it coming down into my body. I'm wondering if anyone has noticed that, if it relates to anything they're doing and especially if it relates to the "inside lines" of power and the "outside lines" of power.

Thanks and best to all.

David

David,

You are correct in that pointing the arms in the directions you described separates the inside and outside lines of the body. The feelings your describe sound similar to what should be felt. (I'll inject a caution in that I'd still have to have a feel, since a lot of things can sound similar, but ultimately only hands on time together will determine whether we have stuff in common

The fingers pointing up and outward are an "orthodox" position. After a while how you augment or train the lines within the body is up to each individual. :)

Good post!

We should be landing in the East Coast sometime soon (read: in less than a year), hopefully you'll be able to make one of the seminars and we can compare notes :D

gdandscompserv
11-13-2007, 08:45 PM
No, I haven't been out there yet. I didn't get a reply to my most recent e-mail. Either I've got the wrong address or it's one he doesn't check often.
Or...he might simply be ignoring you like he does me.:p

Mark Kruger
11-14-2007, 12:26 AM
Knowing both Chris Moses and Tom Wharton, when they showed interested in what Ark is doing, I figure it was worth investigating. The fact that Robert has presented his point of view on this, and other forums, with a minimum amount of arrogance helped. Of course the Seattle seminar was scheduled on the same weekend as a firearms trainer (Southnarc) was teaching in Portland. With the Stanford seminar, I was able to have my cake and eat it too.

I was impressed with the quality and quantity of the information provided. From various instructors over the years, I've heard bits and pieces of what was covered, but never in as complete and coherent a version as was presented by Ark. The descriptions were couched in terms that were easily accessible. I think that this accessibility is one of the key reasons why Ark has been able to teach what he knows so well. The esoteric language of many internal arts has always been a problem for me.

Drills like shiko and tenchijin were taught in a progressive fashion. The rough shape was demonstrated first, then additional information was added as the students, as a group, were able to handle it. I think that the drills on Saturday were in some ways more difficult than the drills on Sunday. Having Ark and Rob going around to adjust postures and actions was invaluable. I suspect that they left a lot unsaid and uncorrected since the crowd was new to the Aunkai training methods and that more refining will occur in the future, either in other seminars in the USA or as folks visit them in Tokyo.

The down sides to the seminar are relatively minor. An earlier start time would have been helpful. 6 hours a day isn't much time to pack all of the information in. The lunch breaks could do with better planning. Some options are: allow for more time to get lunch, ask folks to pack a lunch, or send a few folks to get orders while Ark and Rob helps the others review the covered material.

Anyway, I've got a lot of material to study, so I'll stop blathering on and get back to doing the work. :)

David Orange
11-14-2007, 09:06 AM
You are correct in that pointing the arms in the directions you described separates the inside and outside lines of the body. The feelings your describe sound similar to what should be felt. (I'll inject a caution in that I'd still have to have a feel, since a lot of things can sound similar, but ultimately only hands on time together will determine whether we have stuff in common

Rob,

Thanks for the confirmation! I'm not saying "we" have anything in common: I was exploring what's on your website. So I was looking for what "you" do.

I think I've seen some pictures of Ueshiba doing things with the fingers pointed in, so for years, I have done things (extending simultaneously upward and downward) with the fingers pointing in toward each other.

Recently, while exploring the tenchijin movement with the fingers pointing outward, I tried turning the hands the other way and really felt a strong difference: pointing the fingers inward felt like the "force" was coming down the outside of the arms and down the sides of my ribs. Turning them the outward felt almost like making a "funnel" that guided "the force" (gravity? tension?) down to the insides of my deltoid muscles and down through two parallel paths into the body. I thought, there must be some significance to that, but until someone earlier described Ark's saying something about "inside lines" and "outside lines" I didn't realize there was a specific function of that. So that's a kick. Thanks.

After a while how you augment or train the lines within the body is up to each individual. :)

Good post!

Thanks! Can you comment more about that? I felt that the "force" was coming down into the body, but I'm guessing that feeling the connection all the way down to the ground must be major...

We should be landing in the East Coast sometime soon (read: in less than a year), hopefully you'll be able to make one of the seminars and we can compare notes :D

I will prioritize it. I couldn't get up to see Dan this autumn (we had a very general time frame) and haven't been able to schedule anything more specific yet, but I am very interested in your approach and will work very hard to make it.

Again, thanks.

David

David Orange
11-14-2007, 09:08 AM
Or...he might simply be ignoring you like he does me.:p

I get insecure sometimes, but Dan has always come through, eventually, and always has a positive attitude, so I assume he is busy. I wanted to make it up there "this autumn" sometime, but family obligations (my wife's sister's wedding [$$]) knocked me off that track. So I'm trying to arrange something for the spring.

David

Tom H.
11-14-2007, 10:07 AM
I get insecure sometimes, but Dan has always come through, eventually, and always has a positive attitude, so I assume he is busy.It's how he is. I show up somewhat regularly to train, but phone or email... good luck. By good luck, I mean fat chance, and by fat chance, I mean just about no chance :-).

You're right about his attitude, though.

MM
11-14-2007, 10:33 AM
I'll echo David and Tom in that I'd guess Dan is very busy. (and also, the great attitude part.)

And don't forget that the Holidays are nearly here. Not much free time now.

A glimmer of hope is that with any luck, we'll have a seminar on the East Coast next year with Akuzawa. :)

David Orange
11-14-2007, 11:08 AM
It's how he is. I show up somewhat regularly to train, but phone or email... good luck. By good luck, I mean fat chance, and by fat chance, I mean just about no chance :-).

You're right about his attitude, though.

It'll be a big trip for me, so no "dropping in" and it will have to be very well set up a good while in advance.

We did have an agreement to meet, though very loosely scheduled, so I think "just about no chance" will be okay. We will meet up eventually, I'm sure.

Thanks.

David

David Orange
11-14-2007, 11:10 AM
And don't forget that the Holidays are nearly here. Not much free time now.

Exactly. That's why I had to reset to sometime in the spring. Got a lot to clear out before then.

A glimmer of hope is that with any luck, we'll have a seminar on the East Coast next year with Akuzawa. :)

Yes, that will be a big event. By then, it will probably be hard to get a spot in the seminar!!!

David

Mark Jakabcsin
11-22-2007, 09:32 PM
Good seminar and glad I went.

Step 1 - learn how to stand straight!

MJ

Timothy WK
11-23-2007, 07:04 AM
Step 1 - learn how to stand straight!
That's a lot more difficult than it sounds, isn't it? ;)