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07-05-2007, 09:55 AM
Posted 2007-07-05 08:52:38 by Jun Akiyama
News URL: http://www.flatheadbeacon.com/articles/article/blending_work_and_aikido/c52/387/

This article entitled "Blending Work and Aikido" (http://www.flatheadbeacon.com/articles/article/blending_work_and_aikido/C52/387/) presents how Mark Leitzel and Leigh Schickendantz at the Two Rivers Center of Holistic Counseling and Healing Arts "utilizes the principles of Aikido [...] to help people cope with work-related problems and improve their job skills."

"These principles encourage a person to approach conflict with confidence, not confrontation. A businessman who is confident with his business practices, and himself, doesn’t worry about competition, much like an Aikido master doesn’t need to hurt his opponent to prove himself, Leitzel said."

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Adam Alexander
07-15-2007, 12:09 AM
I read this article with a powerful sense of disappointment.

I wonder what gives the authors the confidence to tell others how business should or shouldn't work. I question their credentials. Should we--should they?--believe that because they run some form of mental health company that they have the experience and wisdom to tell others how to run their businesses in different fields?

Comparing how an Aikido master might treat an attacker to how a business person should treat competition seems terribly forced to me. How one Aikido master treats another in relation to running a dojo and gaining students seems to me more appropriate.

The authors, I believe, have an incredibly warped sense of business. Twisting the Aikido master analogy into place would require that the attacker will never cease his attack. The Aikido master must always be aware of him. If you were a master and you knew that the person you're about to let go is going to try to kill you tomorrow and the next day and next until he succeeds, what would you do?

That is business. There's no unemployment insurance if you can't cover your expenses. Your creditors aren't going to shrug it off that the guy down the street just took ten percent of your business last month. The U.S. Government isn't going to put shoes on your kids feet because you misread the market. When you go under, you're going to pay.

The authors say that people's personal lives are seperate from their professional lives. I interpret part of the point of the article to be that somehow Aikido principles will help alleviate this. However, I don't understand why the authors don't just say that it's best for people to choose jobs they find personally fulfilling.

The authors are hucksters. People dependant on a fool per minute. Beware of them.

It's with a sense of shame that I write this post. I really don't want to. However, I feel an obligation to do so. As a young man starting a business of his own, I was exposed to this sort of thinking by individuals supporting similar opinions. I found out the hard way how warped this perspective is. Foolish, naive and destructive.

I wonder how their opinions would change if dozens of therapy offices competing directly with them opened right on their street. When the competition gets hot, I wonder how they'd turn a blind eye to it. I wonder how a trip to bankruptcy court, a damaged reputation and years of rebuilding their lives would change their opinions.

Hucksters.

SeiserL
07-15-2007, 09:45 AM
While I see the credentials in holistic and transpersonal psychology, I didn't see their credential in Aikido. Even though they state they don't teach Aikido, the working knowledge and application of the principles on the mat help truly understand them off the mat.

Nonetheless, I do complimen t anyone attempting to bridge the gap.

Remember, where ever you go, there you are.

tedehara
07-15-2007, 01:04 PM
While I see the credentials in holistic and transpersonal psychology, I didn't see their credential in Aikido. Even though they state they don't teach Aikido, the working knowledge and application of the principles on the mat help truly understand them off the mat...More importantly I don't see any business credentials. Out of the abc of: aikido, business and consulting they only cover the last with their psychology degrees.

In Japanese there is a word geta. There is no English equivalent, but it means taking theoretical knowledge and bringing it into daily life. Business and aikido are all about performance and the only way you get a feel for that performance is through thought and practice. Like Euclid noted, there is no royal road to learning. Sometimes its just a lot of work.

They might have part of a plan, but it will take much more than a few sessions to build a business. It will take a lot of work.

jennifer paige smith
07-15-2007, 02:54 PM
More importantly I don't see any business credentials. Out of the abc of: aikido, business and consulting they only cover the last with their psychology degrees.

In Japanese there is a word geta. There is no English equivalent, but it means taking theoretical knowledge and bringing it into daily life. Business and aikido are all about performance and the only way you get a feel for that performance is through thought and practice. Like Euclid noted, there is no royal road to learning. Sometimes its just a lot of work.

They might have part of a plan, but it will take much more than a few sessions to build a business. It will take a lot of work.

I thought something very similar to this sentiment. When the text read something like 'we take a piece of aikido principles', a red flag went up. From my training I know that you cannot achieve a whole path by dissecting it arbitrarily and taking a few of the principles that might seem to apply. You end up in a new form of confusion; a new fraction. Not a Whole.
Perhaps they may best achieve their well intentioned goals through employing a trained and practiced aikidoka to teach aikido to their clients. That is, assuming, they aren't interested in
practice themselves.
In my specialized work with people , I work with a specialist in the field. For example, I do counseling groups for teen age women using aikido as my basis, but I do them with a clinical psychologist present and participating. In the end, we both learn from one another. But I don't call myself a clinical psychologist and she doesn't call herself an aikidoka. Together we do very great work that benefits us all.
To be a devil's advocate of sorts: I grant that natural talent cannot be determined by education or by titles, and these folks may have a grasp of universal principle on some natural level. But, it is essential to have hands on experience to back up your work. Or employ someone who does.

SeiserL
07-15-2007, 05:33 PM
Like Euclid noted, there is no royal road to learning. Sometimes its just a lot of work.
LOL, perfectly said.