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liam gaynor
06-08-2007, 04:05 PM
Hi

Just wondered what techniques people use to clear the mind before training, and can we truly over come fear?

Qatana
06-08-2007, 04:17 PM
I use training to clear my mind!

Janet Rosen
06-08-2007, 07:27 PM
Depends how you define "overcome". Seriously. Many people try to "deal with" something by objectifying it into something to be struggled with, so it is this big thing that stands apart from them.

From my experience with fear, anger, and pain, I'd say that doesn't lead anywhere. Accepting it as an integral part of you and being willing to study it, play with it, question it, etc as a part of you seems to be more productive in terms of leading to ways in which a person changes (perception, ideation, behavior, actions, reactions, etc) to where it simply isn't a problem anymore.

Which just came out sounding incredibly, glibly simple, which of course as a process it isn't! But how one frames the issue - struggling to overcome versus a different approach - will lead to a markedly different process, which then can result in a different resolution.

antonis paps
06-08-2007, 09:55 PM
Hi

Just wondered what techniques people use to clear the mind before training, and can we truly over come fear?

mm..

Recently,

I have noticed that I relax with a good stretching of my muscles.

But not the usual stretching.

I reach the limit of pain in my stretching.Don't over:crazy: do it though:eek: .:hypno: :uch:

And I use breathing exercise at the same time.

Try to do as many muscles possible.
especially legs.

I actually believe,that each persons mental state

is being "captured" by the cells of his body.

Meaning that fear,as anxiety,as stress,emotions,medical problems
are mirrored in your body.

As the body and mind are both reflections of each other.


In stretching your muscles,
embracing pain as your friend,
and letting it out with your breath.
you are actually releasing, emotions etc,
and therefore,
clearing your mind of thoughts,
overcoming a small fear, mr.pain:D

Doing good both to your body
and mind at the same time.

As the ancient Greeks said

Νους υγιής εν σώματι υγιεί.
Mens sana in corpore sano.
Healthy mind in healthy body.

Meaning a lot more than the obvious.

Well do not know about overcoming your fears though.:cool:

Hope I helped.

Regards,

Antonis Papas.

xuzen
06-08-2007, 10:15 PM
Just wondered what techniques people use to clear the mind before training,
QUEENS's Bohemian Rhapsody.

and can we truly over come fear?
No. Fear is a psycho-chemical activity that is part of our normal physiological make-up. But there are psychological techniques to de-amplify the magnitude of FEAR (Desensitization)

Boon.

Aikibu
06-08-2007, 10:25 PM
"Fear is the Mind Killer" Frank Herbert in Dune

Hence MU!!!

otherwise known as "no mind"

Talk to me in another 10 ten years and perhaps I will be able to articulate it as well as Roshi "lives" it. LOL

William Hazen

P.S. One of the better scenes in "The Last Samurai" attempts to explain "no mind"

dps
06-08-2007, 11:04 PM
Hi

Just wondered what techniques people use to clear the mind before training, and can we truly over come fear?

Are you talking about fear during training?

Practicing your rolls and breakfalls as a warm up.

David

Mary Eastland
06-09-2007, 05:28 AM
Fear, no, it is a gift that helps me.

Anxiety, yes, decidingly so.

Mary

liam gaynor
06-09-2007, 08:40 AM
Ok I've been training for about a year now and I love Aikido It gives me a real release for stress, and when I train nothing else exists. I train hard heart and soul. I once heard Steven Segal say to a class ' Show me what you have when there's nothing left.' I try to remember that when I train and grade. But there are certain throws that scare the heck out of me. Sumio toshi!!! Any tips would be gratefully received.:freaky:

Mato-san
06-09-2007, 08:54 AM
Aikido does not have have fear in it`s vocab!! If Aikido is fear for you...you visited the wrong dojo!

SeiserL
06-09-2007, 11:06 AM
If you learn how you create fear and stop doing that, you don't have to overcome it becasue you didn't create it to begin with.

antonis paps
06-09-2007, 11:41 AM
"Fear is the Mind Killer" Frank Herbert in Dune

Hence MU!!!

otherwise known as "no mind"

Talk to me in another 10 ten years and perhaps I will be able to articulate it as well as Roshi "lives" it. LOL

William Hazen

P.S. One of the better scenes in "The Last Samurai" attempts to explain "no mind"

Well I wouldn't base my philosophy, on a movie though.;)

Drew Mailman
06-09-2007, 12:18 PM
Well I wouldn't base my philosophy, on a movie though.;)

Then pick more than one movie. :p

jennifer paige smith
06-09-2007, 12:37 PM
Then pick more than one movie. :p

I personally base my life thesis on the movie
American Werewolf in London. RRRRRRR!
(hey,where's my smiley wolf-face icon?)

antonis paps
06-09-2007, 01:24 PM
A lot of aikido humor
at the same place
at the same time..
scary thing I must admit..;))

jennifer paige smith
06-10-2007, 08:19 AM
A lot of aikido humor
at the same place
at the same time..
scary thing I must admit..;))

The scary part is, I wasn't kidding. (still looking for wolfey-face icon, tho).

Seriously, humor gets me through fear.

antonis paps
06-10-2007, 12:45 PM
The scary part is, I wasn't kidding. (still looking for wolfey-face icon, tho).

Seriously, humor gets me through fear.

I suppose humor could make you forget your fear..:)
Well I found my lion faced icon ;)

Adam Alexander
06-10-2007, 01:02 PM
Hi

Just wondered what techniques people use to clear the mind before training, and can we truly over come fear?

I've never been into that clear your mind stuff. When I went to the dojo, I wanted to be there. When I was changing before class, I was talking with the other guys. I wasn't going through any sort of hoky transition.

On days that I was going because I needed to go, but wasn't really into it, the first time hitting the mat usually grabbed my attention and put me in the moment. If not, the first time I was thrown and didn't expect it because I was off somewhere else, that certainly woke me up and brought me to class.

On dealing with fear, if you're talking about fear in class, I like the phrase "just shut up and train". I never really cared for all the stuff people built around something that's so simple. Just do it. There's not a perfect angle, perfect style, perfect anything. You just step up to the plate and do what must be done. (Well, I do. I don't know if that's right for you or not.)

The question is,"Do you want it?" If the answer is yes, then you just look inside to find the solution.

If you're talking about fear in confrontation, it's pretty much the same thing. Except I'd put it in terms like this: The road to confrontation is a toll road that costs many currencies. One of those currencies is peace of mind. Fear is something you will experience on your journey.

Initially, while clouded with arrogance, you'll not notice fear, but as you get closer to your destination it will build. So much so, that if you initiated your journey, you'll begin to question your motive. However, for the most part, you'll find that you tied your own hands and are mostly out of control. In that case, it just builds. The question becomes,"Do you have what it takes to deal with it?"

For me, I just let it happen and reason that anyone in this situation would have fear. Once action begins, if you've practiced well, there's no more fear, just technique. Everything moves so fast, that you totally forget about fear.

On the other hand, if you're confronted, I've found that there's a strength that underlies the fear. I still experience fear, but there's something emboldening when you know you're right. As if the statement "Whatever happens to me is in the name of what's right," is plastered over everything. In that case, it's almost like you're just going to work to correct something that needs to be fixed.

That's just me. It doesn't necessarily have to be the same for you or anyone else. In fact, it might be totally wrong for you.

Can you overcome fear? Who cares? Leave it to philosphers who's lazy lives lack action. Train! Just do it!

liam gaynor
06-10-2007, 01:10 PM
Thank you Jean you make sense:D

Adam Alexander
06-10-2007, 01:20 PM
Thank you Jean you make sense:D

That's what I've been telling everyone! Still, no respect.

Thanks.

mathewjgano
06-10-2007, 01:25 PM
Hi

Just wondered what techniques people use to clear the mind before training, and can we truly over come fear?

Breathing in a relaxed manner seems to work the best for me. Drawing the mind to a focus also helps...which is the point of many breathing exercises I think. Fear, in my opinion, can't be gotten rid of because it's hard-wired into our brains, but it can be managed and regulated through concentration and relaxation.
In my short life so far I've gone back and forth in my ability to manage fear. It's been crippling at times, and strangely absent at others, and the only correlation I can think of is how focused i've been on refining myself. It's like a muscle, if you stop cultivating relaxation, you can begin to cultivate stress...hence, i suppose, for the idea of continuous training in Aikido.

mathewjgano
06-10-2007, 01:36 PM
I've never been into that clear your mind stuff. When I went to the dojo, I wanted to be there. When I was changing before class, I was talking with the other guys. I wasn't going through any sort of hoky transition.

Can you overcome fear? Who cares? Leave it to philosphers who's lazy lives lack action. Train! Just do it!

LOL! I can appreciate that, being one of those damned lazy philosophers (and not really that good at it either). In my opinion, that was some great advice you gave, and I agree it depends on the person. I would say people who tend to act first and think later should practice thinking/meditating more often, while folks like myself who tend toward that already, need to focus on acting and, as you said, engaging the moment as it arises actively.
Take care,
Matt

antonis paps
06-10-2007, 02:56 PM
Well I'll try to put my "bad philosophy thesis" into the conversation:)

-Everyone faces his fears-

Well beginning all fears begin with

"mm..what if.."

If you fear a spider..eventually you will see a spider and face your fear.

If you fear a dog..eventually you will encounter a dog and face your fear.

..Fears are created by us...and we are driven to them.

...Its not a matter of choice..to encounter them(that is).

The matter of choice comes when we do encounter them what we do.

So what was your fear again..?

I think what bothers you

is choice,

not fear.

Regards,

Antonis Papas
Crappy philosopher:)

Janet Rosen
06-10-2007, 09:51 PM
Can you overcome fear? Who cares? Leave it to philosphers who's lazy lives lack action. Train! Just do it!
Jean, while a lot of the "meat" of your post makes sense, you sandwich it between assertions that I wonder if they are hyperbole or if you truly mean them?:
Do you believe that thinking about one's emotional responses to life constitutes "lazy lives" by philosophers?
Do you believe that training mindfully, or for that matter, living mindfully, as many of us do, is for some reason undesirable?

Adam Alexander
06-10-2007, 10:27 PM
Jean, while a lot of the "meat" of your post makes sense, you sandwich it between assertions that I wonder if they are hyperbole or if you truly mean them?:
Do you believe that thinking about one's emotional responses to life constitutes "lazy lives" by philosophers?
Do you believe that training mindfully, or for that matter, living mindfully, as many of us do, is for some reason undesirable?

I think you have to do what's right for you. For me, I think a lot of time worrying about the "why's" and "what if's" has been a detriment to my life.

And to tell you the truth, with all due respect, I really don't know what you mean by living and training mindfully. It sounds hoky.

Why not just say that "I try to do the right thing"? It soudns like you're putting lipstick on a pig. A nice pig, for sure. But why not just call a spade a spade?


BTW: I don't mean anything by the "pig" comment. A coworker used the phrase a month ago and I've been desperate to use it. LOL.

Tomlad
06-11-2007, 05:34 PM
Hi Liam,

Depends what your question really relates to...

If you mean fear in class - such as doing a big break fall you need to have trust in your instructor. I used to think "all I have to do is try and hold on, the rest will just happen". You have to put faith in the class and if you are practicing with someone really rough just tell them to be easier on you.

If you mean fear of confrontation in a fight then that is different. The best technique for this is to imagine that someone you love is also with you - i.e. your partner, parents, children, niece etc. We all hear stories of finding extra strength and courage when helping someone else yet can't seem to do it when protecting ourselves. So, to 'train' your mind (which doesn't happen enough in martial arts) I'd advise to imagine how you would feel if a lunatic attacked you when you had to protect a loved one - this will make it easier to switch in and out of this phase when needed and to eradicate any fear.

Berney Fulcher
07-04-2007, 09:47 AM
I think that there's a lot of fear to overcome in aikido. You can call it something less, "worry", "trepidation" etc, but it's all fear at its base. Fear of pain (nikyo), fear of falling and injuring yourself etc.

But then I also think that part of the training any martial art provides is training to overcome fear or at least learning to stay relaxed in the face of it. I think aikido does a better job at this than other arts I have tried.