PDA

View Full Version : aikido and naikan theory


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


Mark Uttech
05-15-2007, 04:19 PM
How many of you have studied naikan theory alongside aikido? Do you consider naikan therapy advanced meditation? Or adavanced aikido off the mat?

In gassho,

Mark

Chuck Clark
05-15-2007, 06:05 PM
You can interpret any philosophy, religious theology, astrology, fortune cookie contents just about any way you want as long as it fits what you want to hear... add any of that to or alongside "aikido", taking a walk in the park, or bird watching and you can ask the same question as you have above.

Naikan therapy, Morita Therapy, etc. are Japanese derived psychotherapy systems that work especially well with Japanese people getting them to change their problematic behaviors into more acceptable ways of being accountable to the group. Western modes of therapy more often target a person's behavior to their own "inner self" and feeling okay with themselves instead of the group. Often, therapy for a similar problem in Japan or the U.S. for example are diametrically opposed in method due to the difference in our societal values, etc.

For me, to answer your question, the only thing that makes sense is: Do whatever floats your boat and helps you get through the night. Some things people try are dangerous to them and become crutches or addictions, some others are liberating and illuminating. It's up to each one of us to pick our methods. Often one person's medicine is another person's poison. These things can go along with budo training but are not part of it in my opinion. But then it is up to each one of us to define it for ourself and not look to others for permission or acknowledgment and support.

As Morihei Ueshiba is reported to have said... aikido is not religion but helps make your practice of any religion stronger. I can't remember the quote, but I think the meaning is close.

Mark Uttech
05-16-2007, 11:14 AM
You can interpret any philosophy, religious theology, astrology, fortune cookie contents just about any way you want as long as it fits what you want to hear... add any of that to or alongside "aikido", taking a walk in the park, or bird watching and you can ask the same question as you have above.

Naikan therapy, Morita Therapy, etc. are Japanese derived psychotherapy systems that work especially well with Japanese people getting them to change their problematic behaviors into more acceptable ways of being accountable to the group. Western modes of therapy more often target a person's behavior to their own "inner self" and feeling okay with themselves instead of the group. Often, therapy for a similar problem in Japan or the U.S. for example are diametrically opposed in method due to the difference in our societal values, etc.

For me, to answer your question, the only thing that makes sense is: Do whatever floats your boat and helps you get through the night. Some things people try are dangerous to them and become crutches or addictions, some others are liberating and illuminating. It's up to each one of us to pick our methods. Often one person's medicine is another person's poison. These things can go along with budo training but are not part of it in my opinion. But then it is up to each one of us to define it for ourself and not look to others for permission or acknowledgment and support.

As Morihei Ueshiba is reported to have said... aikido is not religion but helps make your practice of any religion stronger. I can't remember the quote, but I think the meaning is close.

Naikan is basically "inner reflection/self reflection" as opposed to Gaikan which is "outer reflection/reflection on others". This ties in very well with aikido, because basically aikido is based on Naikan theory.
In gassho,

Mark

gdandscompserv
05-16-2007, 11:57 AM
Never heard of "naikan theory" until today.

SeiserL
05-16-2007, 01:56 PM
Naikan is basically "inner reflection/self reflection" as opposed to Gaikan which is "outer reflection/reflection on others". This ties in very well with aikido, because basically aikido is based on Naikan theory.
Wouldn't Aikido be the connection (musubi) of the two like a mobius strip?

Mark Uttech
05-16-2007, 07:02 PM
Never heard of "naikan theory" until today.

Thanks Ricky, I think you have just made this thread more credible.
Those of us who have been training for awhile (years) sometimes forget all the signposts we saw and the twists and turns in the road we experienced. Are these things and experiences worthwhile to be discussed? I think they are. I find it interesting that in Buddhism, "sutra" means "thread". So yes, I hope the discussion goes on from here.

In gassho, Mark

jennifer paige smith
05-24-2007, 08:36 AM
Thanks Ricky, I think you have just made this thread more credible.
Those of us who have been training for awhile (years) sometimes forget all the signposts we saw and the twists and turns in the road we experienced. Are these things and experiences worthwhile to be discussed? I think they are. I find it interesting that in Buddhism, "sutra" means "thread". So yes, I hope the discussion goes on from here.

In gassho, Mark

sutra, thread, musubi; connections

BTW: Aikido Journal produced an article regarding naikan last week or the week before.