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willis0890
03-29-2007, 11:44 AM
I am new to Aikido so any Training tips exereses or meditating tips would be greatly Appreciated

akiy
03-29-2007, 11:57 AM
Hi William,

You may want to try using the search engine (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/search.php) in these forums to look for specific tips regarding training.

Otherwise, do you have any specific questions?

-- Jun

DonMagee
03-29-2007, 12:04 PM
Biggest tip I've ever received.

Don't take this so seriously. Your doing this for recreation remember?

Larry Cuvin
03-29-2007, 12:09 PM
Relax and enjoy the training. Don't worry about names of the different techniques right now. Everything will fall into place eventually.

SeiserL
03-29-2007, 12:16 PM
Relax.
Breathe.
Enjoy yourself.
(All easier said than done.)

Welcome.

willis0890
03-29-2007, 12:16 PM
Yay that is a big main thing I was wondering how am i going to remember all the names of the techniques thx for the help:)

Talon
03-29-2007, 12:26 PM
The names of the techniques will become natural to you in time. I don't have to think about those names at all.. I just simply know them. This comes in time.

DonMagee
03-29-2007, 12:35 PM
I use flashcards.

Seriously. I have flashcards for judo with Japanese, then English, and a picture. My wife holds up the card with the picture, I tell her the throw, she asks me what it is in the other language. So names on back, pictures on front. I also watch vids on youtube and write down what techniques I think are being done. I just pause it at random and try to identify the hold/throw/lock/etc being performed. To take this a step further, I try to figure out what is wrong with the technique.

I also take a note book with me to class (well I used to do this). I'm not sure if the aikido teachers will be cool with this, my judo teacher wasn't cool with it at first. My bjj teacher is cool with it. I stopped brining it one day and just keep forgetting to put it in my bag. I would write down notes just like I would in any other class on how the technique should be done, traps to watch out for, and pointers to improve technique. Just be careful to never interrupt the class by asking them to spell something :-P It's hard to squeeze in notes, but if you can be quick you can get some good pointers. I usually just did bullet points.

I also go home and keep a training log of everything I did that day (I still do this even though I do not bring my notebook anymore). I try to describe the techniques in detail, point out my flaws, strengths, etc for the technique. I also record things I watched from other students that I liked and did not like to keep them in my mind so I can use/look out for the same things in my training. I try to make this log as deep as possible. A private blog works good for this, or a personal wiki.

Every Sunday I read my weekly log and reflect on what I did. This is usually when I break out my books and look for new toys to play with next week. I try to plot a schedule of things I want to keep in mind and work on the next week. At first it is probably just enough to read your log and let the teacher do the planning.

Finally I ask lots of questions. I mean lots. Depending on the class structure, I may ask after class, or before class. In judo I asked senior students during free play. In bjj I ask when the teacher says "Any questions?" or during free sparing time. In aikido I would ask after class. It really depends on the structure of the class and how your teachers are.

One thing to watch out for when asking questions is that you must realize sometimes you will not have the experience to understand the answer. If you ask a judo instructor why you do shrimp crawls across the floor on your first day, you will probably get told wait and see, because the answer is a lesson in itself on how this movement helps pin escapes and throws. So the answer may be less then what you want at first. They may say "To improve ki" or "This motion lends itself to breaking balance". Just give it a few months and see if you can make sense of it before probing deeper. Sometimes the answer is one you do not want to hear either "This throw sucks and nobody ever uses it, but you have to learn it for your blackbelt kata."

So have fun and relax, if you are really into it, make some flash cards, keep a training log, and keep a skeptical mind that asks questions. It will give you a deeper understanding of what you are learning.

Timothy WK
03-29-2007, 12:48 PM
I was wondering how am i going to remember all the names of the techniques
There actually aren't that many "techniques". There are (depending on your style) 5 basic pins/controls, 5 basic throws, 5 attacks, 2 stances, 2 directions, plus a few basic movements. Techniques are a combination of the above, such as "katate-dori ikkyo ai-hamni tenkan". Which means: katate-dori (attack--one wrist grab) ikkyo (control/throw--first control) ai-hamni (stance--same side) tenkan (direction--spin around your opponent). It seems overwhelming at first, but once you know the basic vocab (20 or so) you can figure out the name based on what you did or saw.

barry.clemons
03-29-2007, 07:36 PM
Don,

I have to say that I thoroughly enjoy reading and subscribe to your approach to training. first, understanding and accepting your needs and desires in what you what to get out of your training, and then your systematic attempts at achieving them. whether or not opinions agree on philosophy or application, your approach is always refreshing.

I use flashcards.

Seriously. I have flashcards for judo with Japanese, then English, and a picture. My wife holds up the card with the picture, I tell her the throw, she asks me what it is in the other language. So names on back, pictures on front. I also watch vids on youtube and write down what techniques I think are being done. I just pause it at random and try to identify the hold/throw/lock/etc being performed. To take this a step further, I try to figure out what is wrong with the technique.

I also take a note book with me to class (well I used to do this). I'm not sure if the aikido teachers will be cool with this, my judo teacher wasn't cool with it at first. My bjj teacher is cool with it. I stopped brining it one day and just keep forgetting to put it in my bag. I would write down notes just like I would in any other class on how the technique should be done, traps to watch out for, and pointers to improve technique. Just be careful to never interrupt the class by asking them to spell something :-P It's hard to squeeze in notes, but if you can be quick you can get some good pointers. I usually just did bullet points.

I also go home and keep a training log of everything I did that day (I still do this even though I do not bring my notebook anymore). I try to describe the techniques in detail, point out my flaws, strengths, etc for the technique. I also record things I watched from other students that I liked and did not like to keep them in my mind so I can use/look out for the same things in my training. I try to make this log as deep as possible. A private blog works good for this, or a personal wiki.

Every Sunday I read my weekly log and reflect on what I did. This is usually when I break out my books and look for new toys to play with next week. I try to plot a schedule of things I want to keep in mind and work on the next week. At first it is probably just enough to read your log and let the teacher do the planning.

Finally I ask lots of questions. I mean lots. Depending on the class structure, I may ask after class, or before class. In judo I asked senior students during free play. In bjj I ask when the teacher says "Any questions?" or during free sparing time. In aikido I would ask after class. It really depends on the structure of the class and how your teachers are.

One thing to watch out for when asking questions is that you must realize sometimes you will not have the experience to understand the answer. If you ask a judo instructor why you do shrimp crawls across the floor on your first day, you will probably get told wait and see, because the answer is a lesson in itself on how this movement helps pin escapes and throws. So the answer may be less then what you want at first. They may say "To improve ki" or "This motion lends itself to breaking balance". Just give it a few months and see if you can make sense of it before probing deeper. Sometimes the answer is one you do not want to hear either "This throw sucks and nobody ever uses it, but you have to learn it for your blackbelt kata."

So have fun and relax, if you are really into it, make some flash cards, keep a training log, and keep a skeptical mind that asks questions. It will give you a deeper understanding of what you are learning.

Alec Corper
03-30-2007, 02:59 AM
Spend more time training and less time reading AikiWeb ;-)

dps
03-30-2007, 04:34 AM
William,
Be sure to check the profiles of the people on Aikiweb before you decide to listen to their advice. There are a lot of higher ranked individuals with knowledge and experience they willingly share. There are a lot of individuals with less experience and knowledge that have a lot to contribute also. Be careful of those with little or no experience in Aikido that do not know Aikido and are very willing to tell you what and how to practice. Search the archives and read what has been said and who has said it to get a feel for those who know, those who don't, and those who think they do.

David

charyuop
03-30-2007, 07:53 AM
Hi, I am a beginner too, just very few months of practice.
Before starting I watched many videos, read many forums and internet articles. I wanted to be the more prepeared I could...well if I could go back in time I would not do the same thing. It all created a big tension and being nervous. I wanted to show that I could do it and thus trying too hard I just made my life harder. I went in there and Sensei threw at us (I was the only one new) a bunch of techniques and it was so overwhelming. He would tell me how to move my feet and doesn't matter how close I would get to it, it was always wrong. He didn't use any name of techniques back then, but even if he did I wouldn't have understood anything because all those techniques where so many to remember.

And now??? Well, now it is different. Not because I am good, because I am not. I still place my feet in wrong positions, have problems to avoid placing the weight of my body in the wrong place. It is still frustrating at times. But what is different is my attitude. I am no longer there to show I can do it, I am there just to do it. I take every class by itslef and try to sponge in the more I can from Sensei and class mates....what I don't get I am not worried about because that class, if not tomorrow maybe next week, it will come back.

With time you will see that even tho you do many different things in a class (well that depend on the Sensei of course) they are all linked together. The more classes you attend the easier will be for to realize "wait that is the same technique I did last week, just under a different (let's say) prospective". And when you will see all these relations amongst the various attacks and responses learning the name of techniques will come almost naturally.

There is a book I read and if you want to read something that introduces you to Aikido I think it wouldn't be a bad choice. It is called "Aikido and the sphere". But I would suggest to skip the ending part of the book where it describes the techniques, coz every style and Sensei has different approaches to techniques: so on techniques just trust your Sensei and forget the book.

dps
03-30-2007, 09:49 AM
There is a book I read and if you want to read something that introduces you to Aikido I think it wouldn't be a bad choice. It is called "Aikido and the sphere". But I would suggest to skip the ending part of the book where it describes the techniques, coz every style and Sensei has different approaches to techniques: so on techniques just trust your Sensei and forget the book.

Is the book called "Aikido and The Dynamic Sphere" by Adelle Westbrook and Oscar Ratti.

David

Largo
03-30-2007, 11:38 AM
In aikido, the names are really easy (compared to chinese martial arts). Essentially they are techniques 1-5 (ikkyo-gokkyo), then the throws ( )+ nage.

As far as other tips go, I would say to only work on a few things at a time, and not to worry when you get the deluge of advice from your sempai (seniors). No once can fix everything at once.

charyuop
03-30-2007, 02:33 PM
Is the book called "Aikido and The Dynamic Sphere" by Adelle Westbrook and Oscar Ratti.

David

Yes David, my bad I forgot a piece of the title. It is Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere.

barry.clemons
03-30-2007, 09:12 PM
that is an excellent book. excellent. Another recommendation would be The Spirit Of Aikido.

Is the book called "Aikido and The Dynamic Sphere" by Adelle Westbrook and Oscar Ratti.

David

Matthew White
04-05-2007, 10:41 PM
In the words of Chuck Clark-sensei:

Don't quit and don't die.

of my own experience, I train in a different style from aikikai, but when I started I was all gung-ho about learning and wanted to do it as fast as possible (which is utterly silly and bunk in retrospect) but I asked my teacher and he suggested Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere... it was like giving a monkey a math problem... by the time I understood the book, I didn't need the book. Borrow it from somebody in your dojo or the library, or hit the Barnes&Noble and read some of it instore. Go back in a two years and see if you need it... then maybe fork out the money for it.

Mark Uttech
04-06-2007, 07:06 AM
My advice to any beginner would be: just begin. Begin with your local dojo. Go to class. Keep an aikido notebook. The aikido world today is very wide and vast, but if you just stay with yourself and study the experiences you have, your personal foray into aikido will expand; and well it should: you are on a journey.

In gassho

Mark

mwible
04-15-2007, 08:22 PM
i agree with some of the other people who posted. the names just fell into place for me. i didnt spend to much time worying about the names, i just listened in class and learned to associate the technique with the name. :D

Russell Pearse
04-15-2007, 09:27 PM
Hi:

Don't worry if you find it confusing - it gets worse...

Russell