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Suru
02-20-2007, 08:45 PM
O'Sensei was relatively short. Throughout his whole life, he had to deal with condescension from so many ignorant people. When someone caught up in relative thinking speaks to, or even thinks about someone shorter, an unhealthy association is made. This association is simple: I look down on him/her physically, so I look down on him/her mentally. This could even be the primary cause for some men to think they're superior to women.

Everyone has obstacles; not everyone chooses to endure the pain of overcoming them as O'Sensei did. That's why we call him Great Teacher. Through complexity unimaginable, he overcame his attachment to his own relative thinking in spite of the existence of the ignorance of those around him. He overcame loneliness by befriending everything. Then he set up a system that would help the world do the same. One biased by 20/20 hindsight might simply say he turned a frown upside-down. This is delusional because he had to live every second, every microsecond, every nanosecond, every picosecond, and every instant of his life conquering ignorance, inflicting the least amount of psychological and physical pain possible onto others while mainting his own true pride.

Drew

Mike Hamer
02-20-2007, 09:25 PM
ok





























Short people have an advantage at shiho nage, so theres nothing wrong with being short.

Edward
02-20-2007, 09:45 PM
I don't think Ueshiba was smaller or shorter than the average Japanese of that time. In fact, in his earlier photos, he gives the impression to be impressive physically compared to the other people in the photo. Jigoro Kano was approximately the same height and was much less impressive. Maybe Osensei shrunk during old age.

mathewjgano
02-20-2007, 10:38 PM
What's your source for this description of Osensei's life? I'm not sure Osensei's greatest obstacle was being surrounded by ignorant people. "According to the founder, true victory (Masakatsu) is the victory one achieves over oneself (AGATSU)."
I'm curious about this part: Through complexity unimaginable, he overcame his attachment to his own relative thinking in spite of the existence of the ignorance of those around him.
They're certainly a poetic set of words, but a bit too abstract for me to understand perhaps. Many people deal with ignorance every day...most of us suffer from it intrinsically. What is "relative thinking" and in what way did Osensei overcome it?
Take care,
Matt

Gernot Hassenpflug
02-20-2007, 11:22 PM
O'Sensei seems to have gone out of his way to find people who were well-versed in the kind of things he was interested in learning. That a majority of people are "ignorant" of such things is pretty much the case for any specialty you care to name.

mikegeorge
02-21-2007, 12:07 AM
I think O'Sensei was short earlier in his life. I read that he tried to join the military but he was too short the first time he tried. He tried to stretch himself so he would be tall enough. I can not remember where I read this.

Suru
02-21-2007, 03:55 AM
What's your source for this description of Osensei's life? I'm not sure Osensei's greatest obstacle was being surrounded by ignorant people. "According to the founder, true victory (Masakatsu) is the victory one achieves over oneself (AGATSU)."
I'm curious about this part:
They're certainly a poetic set of words, but a bit too abstract for me to understand perhaps. Many people deal with ignorance every day...most of us suffer from it intrinsically. What is "relative thinking" and in what way did Osensei overcome it?
Take care,
Matt

I hope I don't seem like I'm posting so much on here just to sell my book, but if you do read my book, along with good books on Buddhism, Taoism, and other Eastern wisdom, you will better understand relative thinking. If I could give you easy answers, I would.

Drew

Joe Bowen
02-21-2007, 04:33 AM
O'Sensei was a short bad-A##, little fire plug. He didn't pursue his marital arts training to bring harmony to the world. He may have left us with this legacy of harmony but he didn't start with it. No one who wants to create love and harmony seeks out a destructive forces like Sokaku Takeda. You learn from Takeda to kick some butt. O'Sensei definitely started on the Martial side then after he met Deguchi he began his quest for world domin..I mean, peace:D . The Art and philosophy came after the training not before it.

Isn't "relative thinking" redundant. Isn't all thinking relative to the thinker? If not, is there such a thing as "universal" thinking? What would be an example of "non-relative" thinking?

No need for any more buddhist books beyond Nagarjuna...

Suru
02-21-2007, 06:15 AM
No one who wants to create love and harmony seeks out a destructive forces like Sokaku Takeda.

I know I make bold statements on here and I'm careful every time I do. What if O'Sensei saw through to the real Takeda, the deep, complex man he really was, just like you and me? There are things we will never know, so we can either ignore, delude ourselves by assuming to know (making an ASS out of U and ME), or ponder and make educated guesses.

How could O'Sensei love a man who might've made many big mistakes?

The most important words to me in Mitsugi Saotome Shihan's incredible work of art, "Aikido and the Harmony of Nature," are "When you understand, you cannot hate."

We can strongly dislike someone we have a good understanding of, but we cannot hate that person.

My favorite words in George Leonard Sensei's "The Way of Aikido--Life Lessons From an American Sensei" are "Only don't know."

I'm taking these words out of context, but I highly recommend both books to any person capable of abstract thought, Aikidoka or not.

Drew

Gernot Hassenpflug
02-21-2007, 07:52 AM
He didn't pursue his marital arts training to bring harmony to the world.

Heh. No wonder he was such a Bad-A## LOL

Ecosamurai
02-21-2007, 08:22 AM
O Sensei's biggest obstacle?

Hmmm.... Tenryu?

Mike

Cyrijl
02-21-2007, 08:53 AM
Maybe his biggest obstacle was other people putting words in his mouth and attributing feelings to him which were not his. I noticed alot of that from you Drew.

Suru
02-21-2007, 10:02 AM
Maybe his biggest obstacle was other people putting words in his mouth and attributing feelings to him which were not his. I noticed alot of that from you Drew.

Maybe, but dubious.

Drew

Roman Kremianski
02-21-2007, 10:46 AM
I agree with everything Joseph Bowen said. O-Sensei started training at a young age because he wanted to be strong and kickass. Same reason several of his shihan students started as well, and I know it's definitely why I started, even though that's no longer the reason.

I think people forget that before O-Sensei became a mellow old guy, he did his share of ass kicking too. :uch:

BC
02-22-2007, 12:28 PM
Please, it is not O'Sensei. He was not Irish.

SeiserL
02-22-2007, 01:06 PM
O'Sensei was relatively short.
I have spent 12 years studying with Sensei Dang Thong Phong of Tenshinkai Aikido who is only 5' tall. And I mean tall. Height was certainly not his largest obstacle, but perhaps I have been (6'4").

Kevin Leavitt
02-22-2007, 01:18 PM
His largest Obstacle?

Death of his physical body.

charyuop
02-22-2007, 02:09 PM
O'Sensei was a short bad-A##, little fire plug. He didn't pursue his marital arts training to bring harmony to the world. He may have left us with this legacy of harmony but he didn't start with it. No one who wants to create love and harmony seeks out a destructive forces like Sokaku Takeda. You learn from Takeda to kick some butt. O'Sensei definitely started on the Martial side then after he met Deguchi he began his quest for world domin..I mean, peace:D . The Art and philosophy came after the training not before it.

I have never met O Sensei and never met people who knew him, thus I have just to judge for what I read about him.
In the period O Sensei studied under Takeda he was the one who would fight all challanges that were made to Takeda. According to what I have read O Sensei never killed or seriously injured anyone of those...well maybe he was not that bad-a## that you said.
Of course what I read might be wrong and you might be right, but since nor you neither I know the real truth I prefere keeping my opinion as a good and fair man.