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Rachel Strickman
11-12-2006, 03:30 AM
Hello all,
About two months ago I started having some problems with my hips. It started slowly at first but now whenever I exercise, or even walk too far, one or the other (sometimes both) become very sore and tender to the touch. I finally gave in and made an appointment to see the doctor but that is not for three weeks (hello, student health services). Aikido esp ukemi makes this problem worse :( Does anybody have any idea what might be causing this, how I can stop it getting any worse and any ideas for how I could keep training? Or would that be a stupid thing to do? I really like aikido but I like my legs more!

thank you!!

Mark Uttech
11-12-2006, 05:35 AM
You might try a chiropractor. You could have had your pelvis knocked aside.

In gassho
Mark

Jory Boling
11-12-2006, 07:38 AM
You might try a chiropractor. You could have had your pelvis knocked aside.

In gassho
Mark

Is "knocked aside pelvis" a clinical term in chiropractic?
(I thought the word was chiropractory until i checked chiroweb and they said it didn't exist!).

thanks,
J

Jeanne Shepard
11-12-2006, 10:42 PM
It may be soft tissue (muscles, etc.) Try stretching. If that helps, it probably is that. Then it's a matter of strengthening and conditioning.

Jeanne :p

Lan Powers
11-12-2006, 11:01 PM
It would probably be a good idea to lay off from the mat for a bit 'till the Dr. can give you an opinion that isn't just from reading your posts. (But we will do the best long-range- diagnosis we can ) ;)
Lan

Janet Rosen
11-13-2006, 12:57 AM
i recommend you see a sports med doc, because most run of the mill docs-including orthopedists-focus on everything BUT soft tissue issues. a sports med doc if such is available to you will be more familiar with body use issues in athletics including soft tissue overuse patterns.

fatebass21
12-06-2006, 12:09 AM
:D i recommend you see a sports med doc, because most run of the mill docs-including orthopedists-focus on everything BUT soft tissue issues. a sports med doc if such is available to you will be more familiar with body use issues in athletics including soft tissue overuse patterns.

I second this. I first started experiencing pain in my right hamstring area about 14-16 months after starting my Aikido training. I stupidly ignored this for a few months as it was intermittent, and assumed I had pulled a muscle.

A few months later I experienced it stronger, to the point that I could barely walk. I went to a local chiropractor who specialized in sports injuries, and turns out it was sciatica pain because my hips were offset. Also, I found out I have a nice case of scoliosis of the spine. After a few months of adjustments (and a pretty penny or two) my sciatica pains are gone and I am gearing up to get back to my training. I will take it slow and not overdue it.

I recommend you take a week or two off and get examined by a chiropractor who deals with sports injuries.

stelios
12-06-2006, 03:22 AM
Tell you what, whenever I made an appointment with any doctor at the studen'ts helath services I was given a date after a month or so. Do something else. Go to your local hospital after 19:00 in the evening and have a specialised physician check you up as an emergency. If the specialised physician decides it is nothing serious you might as well wait for your appointment at college. In any other case you might be assisted better in a hospital (where the experience of the personnel is usually more/better valued since they deal with many more incidents per day every day). I always went to my local hospital and, thank God, in one case my life was saved! If I had waitedfor the college doctor's appiontment I would probably be dead by now!

SeiserL
12-06-2006, 06:46 AM
Gotta second and third the advice to get a good examination and evaluation by a sports medical professional to know what you may be dealing with.

Also, chiropractors have keep me in the game longer than I care to admit. Sometimes some stretching, deep muscle work, and trigger points assist recovery.

Being more conscientious in my training has help not to ignore the pain and train wiser.