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Aran Bright
11-03-2006, 06:43 PM
I have recently begun to teach aikido to groups involved in alcohol and drug rehabilitation and was wanting to know if there is anyone else out there with experience with this sort of thing.

acot
11-03-2006, 08:48 PM
Great! You've found Aikido's most practical purpose. I've recently begun to teach Aikido at a shelter for victims of human trafficing. (slaves). Sorry that probable not what your looking for, but kudos for your efforts..

Ryan

SeiserL
11-04-2006, 08:47 AM
While I don't teach the physical techniques in my work, I sure teach and apply the principles.

Also, check in with the good people at Aiki-Extensions.

markwalsh
11-04-2006, 02:57 PM
Yup - there's a bunch at AE - was article in the last newsletter from a gent in the States called Ron Hule. Extract:

CLINICAL MARTIAL ART PROGRAM - Participant questionnaire:

How is this program helping you in your daily life?

This program has helped me to be more content with the way that some things in my life are going. It helps me to understand my feelings and when Iím angry, sad, mad, happy just to be able to sit with it instead of acting negatively on myself, by self destructing. When I first came to Day One (Rehab) I had a lot of anxiety problems and it was hard for me to sit with myself. In this class we do a lot of relaxation meditation also, and that helps me throughout my days with my anxiety. I have anxiety problems, and most people with anxiety problems just have problems breathing. Sometimes it will just be hard for me to not, not breath, if that makes any sense. But, the counting meditation, where you take a deep breath and then count 1, and exhale then breath in and count 2, that helps me throughout my day when Iím having anxiety problems. I use that as a coping skill with my anxiety. Also I do a lot of the warm up stuff throughout the day just to get my blood pressure up and help me relax.


What do you like best about the program and what would you like to see more of?
The thing that I like best about this program is how patient the instructors are and how they never give up on me. No matter how negative I am or the other people in the class are. Ron and Richard are very kind, patient and understanding people. That really do care about their students, and how they can help them develop their skills in Aikido and help them grow. They are positive influences on our lives and help me personally to be more open minded about living a sober life. I really also enjoy the way in every class they relate drugs and alcohol addiction problems to Aikido. And how it can help you get through those cravings.

Elena 17

SteveTrinkle
11-04-2006, 04:41 PM
I've been training aikido for about 12 years and working in the addiction/dual diagnosis field for about 15 years. Aikido has had a hugely transforming effect on my aproach to doing individual, group, and family therapy. Started working with Lia Suzuki Sensei in this area about 9 years ago. ( *See the links at the bottom of this page: http://www.akisb.com/ ). I'm especially interested these days in teaching aiki-thinking to other therapists and staff. I could go on and on with this as it is a real passion of mine.

I wish you great fortune in this endeavour. Pease contact me at any time if I could be of use.

Steve

Aran Bright
11-05-2006, 02:57 AM
While I don't teach the physical techniques in my work, I sure teach and apply the principles.

Also, check in with the good people at Aiki-Extensions.

I am curious to know, what is your work, psychology? counselling?

ian
11-05-2006, 03:47 AM
Though its not aikido, I think it shows something about our society...

I was listening to the radio about juevenile re-offenders rates. Apparently those that were taught to fish as rehabilitation had a 0% re-offence rate!

I think for many of us, we just want to feel some value in our lives; that we are useful, important, good at something or valued. Be that from our work, an activity, from religion or whatever.

SeiserL
11-05-2006, 07:38 PM
I am curious to know, what is your work, psychology? counselling?
Believe it or not, for 28 years I have had some international respect in the clinical treatment of violence, trauma, abuse, and addiction. Go figure.

aikidodragon
11-05-2006, 09:31 PM
I think that Aikido is grate for abusers and ther victoms.

First of all some one who is abusing a drug, or lashing out at people can binifit from the principles. Aikido i think teaches one to bewere of them selves. If you feel a craving coming on, you can practicing medation, kata, or worm ups. If you feel like hurting others you may be aware enough that you can stop and practice the breathing excersises.

For the victoms aikido gives them a safe outlet for there emotions. For me theripy did not work, i would tell them what ever they wanted to hear to get them to leave me allone, and the medications eventually stopped working. The first art i took up after the abuse was Judo. It allowed me a chance to learn how to manage my rage and hate. However i think aikido has helped me the most. Being able to go to practice has kept me from going back to the self destructive habits i had. i find myself doing meditative breathing when some thing presents its self and and starts to bring back flashbacks. It has also helped me to learn to trust people again. i have to trust them not to hurt me, and that was the hardes thing for me to relearn.

this may not help you, but this is how aikido is helping me deal with the depression and the P.T.S. It has also helped keep me off drugs and out of the mental words.

I wish you the best of luck with your program.

markwalsh
11-10-2006, 05:36 PM
Sara respects - brave post, thank you.

Sensei out there - please, please, please, read Paul Linden Senseis work on abuse, if you run even a medium sized dojo you PROBABLY TEACH SOMEONE WHO WAS ABUSED as a child in your dojo and almost certainly teach someone who has been raped. I think this is important as aikido deals with issues of self-defense, power, vulnerability, close physical contact and other things that will bring up strong reactions and can be used to heal or hurt.

Look up the stats if you think I'm exagerating.

Carol Shifflett
11-10-2006, 07:11 PM
Look up the stats if you think I'm exagerating.Excellent advice Mark! Actually, back in the early 80's, before the days of Karate Day Care, it started to dawn on me that there were two basic groups of students.

1. One was fascinated by the physics.

2. The other had been abused as child or adult and was still fighting demons.

The two groups overlap.

On wandering into Contract Job Shopping (long before it was as common as now), I discovered that if you watched and listened you would spot many abused children. They self-selected in that population simply because they were the ones best able to deal with the appalling contractor policies of an IBM or other Big Company determined not to let you forget for one minute that you weren't really part of The Family. Adult Abused Children survived the best because they were *accustomed* to abuse. I heard horrific gut-wrenching stories that made 120-hr work weeks a walk in the park. Business as Usual. I also noticed that almost all of them were in or had been in some form of martial arts -- which at the time was relatively rare in the population as a whole.

I think the bottom line is this: As in blood-borne pathogen policies, if teaching martial arts, assume abuse until proven otherwise. Very often the ones who show up in rehab are little different from the ones on the mat -- they've merely come out or been dragged out of the closet.

Hope for a matful of budding physics students.
Plan for the broken and the shattered.

And if in doubt, talk to Sensei Seiser <BOW>

Carol Shifflett

markwalsh
11-11-2006, 04:39 AM
Carol,

Was expecting a really hostile response to my messsge , which I almost didn't dare write, so very glad of your supportive words, wisdom and contribution.

E-hugs,
Mark

SeiserL
11-11-2006, 05:07 AM
And if in doubt, talk to Sensei Seiser <BOW>
Who me? Yep, gotta confirm what 28 years of clinical practice with offenders and victims of violence, trauma, abuse, and addiction has taught me: that we all have windmills and demons to face and fight.

Aikido is an excellent tool.

BTW, I am only an old perpetual student, perhaps a Sempai, but certainly not a Sensei.

Carol Shifflett
11-11-2006, 06:45 AM
Who me? . . . .BTW, I am only an old perpetual student, perhaps a Sempai, but certainly not a Sensei.Yeah, YOU! <grin>
That's a PhD next to your name, right? = Eng. doctor, teacher, from Latin, docere, to teach. And slipping sideways into Japanese where regardless of the topic, teacher = Sensei, neh? And I've noticed over the years at this here Dojo of Virtual Life Skills that you teach very VERY well in this topic particularly.

Cheers!
Carol

Aran Bright
11-12-2006, 02:03 AM
Thank you for replying to this thread.

What are the core principles that you maintain to allow the healing to occur rather than further damage. I know when someone who is ready to face there demons are already very unsettled to begin with how can stop from making it worse?

SeiserL
11-12-2006, 07:25 AM
What are the core principles that you maintain to allow the healing to occur rather than further damage. I know when someone who is ready to face there demons are already very unsettled to begin with how can stop from making it worse?
Core principles? IMHO ...

Unsettled? Absolutely. Welcome the lack of center and balance so you can find a new one. Its a transition state. Shift from the judgmental learned ego identity to the spiritual identity we all really are.

Accept what was and what is. You can't change the past or that everything didn't happen the way you want it to. Its not all about you. We often feel helpless because we are. These are just statements of fact.

There is no judgment. That is a part of the learned ego identity. We learned it as a reflection to others, so its not really about us, its about them.

According to the big book, all addiction comes from spiritual bankruptcy, which equates to psychological self judgment, we falsely believe in our identity that if our higher power calls we are unworthy to pick up the phone. Spiritual abundance to to honest believe that we are all worth it, including me, and that our spirituality (our true identity) is already just fine.

There are no problems, just solutions we keep trying that don't work.

The miracle is to see through the illusion to who we all really are. Its a shift in perception. Choose the miracle.

Okay, okay ... he catches himself, ends the mini-lectures, steps away from the podium, bows, and returns to the mat. (Sorry, you hit a subject I am very passionate about.)

Carol Shifflett
11-12-2006, 12:32 PM
There are no problems, just solutions we keep trying that don't work.
The miracle is to see through the illusion to who we all really are. Its a shift in perception. Choose the miracle.
Okay, okay ... he catches himself, ends the mini-lectures, steps away from the podium, bows, and returns to the mat. (Sorry, you hit a subject I am very passionate about.)Hai! Thank you Sensei!
<BOW>
CS

Aran Bright
11-13-2006, 02:06 AM
The miracle is to see through the illusion to who we all really are. Its a shift in perception. Choose the miracle.


So then, are you saying that we are all one and that we forget this and that by embracing all of our behaviour and attitudes in a non-judgmental way this will serve to break this illusion?

The sessions that I teach are actually not aiki waza but more the meditation, breathing and taiso. Also I borrow a lot from Seitai and Sotai exercise traditons. The aim of what I do is to let people calm down and except the movements of there body and then hopefully the movements of there mind.

I try to creat an atmosphere where people can have there own space but still operate in a space with others. This teaching is done at hospital so there are restraints on what we can do ie. no contact.

I guess I looking for practical techniques, meditations or just advice on how to conduct these sessions.

I have really appreciated all of the feedback so far and as someone said earlier, this is the most important purpose of aikido so please if you have some thoughts, even if you think I am crazy, please let me know.

:ai:

SeiserL
11-13-2006, 06:43 AM
IMHO, it will help. Many of our neurosis and psychosis start from a judgmental and separated (existential angst) position. Accepting "what is" and who we really are beyond the the learned ego identity, shifts the identity frame of reference to a more positive and workable one.

Go slow.

Always build in a security anchor, sense many of the trance states associated with meditation work can be triggers for the defense mechanism trance states.

Slide above their life time line and find a time before they had problems. Who and where were they? How did they do that then? Slide forward to the future, ask them to do it again.

"Judgment" and "separation" according to who? Find the referential index. Its not ones "self". Its in reference to some "other".

Enter, blend, and redirect. Pace, pace, pace, lead.

To go from "crazy" to "sane" often feels like "in-sanity". Many think that going "crazy" is the "sane" way to deal with the "insane" reality from which they come.

Compliments an appreciation for being "crazy" enough to enter and blend. No advancement was ever made by people playing it safe and not having the courage to reach out to each others pain and suffering.

markwalsh
11-13-2006, 07:57 AM
Lynn - Looks like material for a good article here - would encourage Aiki Extensions to publish. You may also like to be in contact with David Lukoff AE Board Member and clinical psychologist, responsible for adding a spiritual dimension to DSMV.

Aran Bright
11-14-2006, 06:39 AM
Lynn - Looks like material for a good article here - would encourage Aiki Extensions to publish. You may also like to be in contact with David Lukoff AE Board Member and clinical psychologist, responsible for adding a spiritual dimension to DSMV.

No way, I wouldn't have thought that possible. :D

thank you all for your feed back, I hope this thread continues...
.

markwalsh
11-14-2006, 08:13 AM
[No way, I wouldn't have thought that possible.

Yeah, radical stuff!
David's a great guy - a true gentleman - and I don't say that just because he gave me a ride to the pub every Thursady after training, when I lived as a deshi on a ranch far from anywhere :-) He understood my spiritual needs :-)

SeiserL
11-14-2006, 02:50 PM
I am always open to share what I can to be of help.

If some one wants to suggest it to AE, they are welcomed to. I am sure you could get some excellent contribution from their members.

markwalsh
11-14-2006, 05:57 PM
Lynn - write a piece and I'll have it uploaded for you, and will also link it back to this thread - be good to share what you have to offer.
Mark

SeiserL
11-15-2006, 04:41 PM
Lynn - write a piece and I'll have it uploaded for you, and will also link it back to this thread - be good to share what you have to offer.
Thanks for the offer, but I would suggest you run just the idea of this thread up the flag pole and see if anyone at AE salutes it.

IMHO, it would be far better to have the perspective of multiple people sharing their experience.

acot
11-15-2006, 10:31 PM
This is by far one of the best threads I've had the chance to read though. It really strikes at the heart of what Aikido really does. Lynn with all that passion you should write a book on it, and how to apply some of it in a laymen's for those who don't have the clinical experience. I think Dojos everywhere would benefit from such commentary.
Ryan

SeiserL
11-16-2006, 06:42 AM
This is by far one of the best threads I've had the chance to read though. It really strikes at the heart of what Aikido really does. Lynn with all that passion you should write a book on it, and how to apply some of it in a laymen's for those who don't have the clinical experience. I think Dojos everywhere would benefit from such commentary.

Wow, thank you. I am humbled.

Actually, I do have a collection of articles I have written on Aikido application to many situations "off the mat". I have sent queries to several publishers, received compliments, but no acceptance yet. Many of the past articles from my column (that Jun talked me into, thank you very much) are included. Its called Aiki-Solutions. Now that I have some other projects completed, with this threads encouragement (along with the NVC thread) perhaps I revive it, run it up a flag pole again, and see if anyone salutes it.

BTW, its mostly about entering and blend with a problem rather than resisting it, unbalancing its basic intent or expression, and redirecting it towards a win/win solutions. The biggest problem (and solution) we have is our own mind, especially the part we call identity. Yea, like we can't change our own mind.

Thanks again for the response, support, and encouragement. Its what always keep me showing up at the dojo all these years.

markwalsh
11-16-2006, 06:51 AM
Lynn - tell me what you need, and will do my best to help.

acot
11-16-2006, 09:44 AM
Finding that win/win is the most difficult. If the problem is unbalanced it could fall into a worse direction. Resisting on the on set seems a whole lot easier, although it may not provide the solution, but might prevent a bigger problem. Aikido has brought out a lot of awareness issues for me, and problems I didn't even know I had have come up. It has also become away of finding that win/win. Still with only 6 years on the mat, I'm just a beginner and finding that win/win or no deal is the hardest part of the training.

Lambdadragon
04-21-2007, 01:07 AM
Hello Aran,

Philip Huang Sensei has worked extensively in the health education and HIV prevention field, as a counselor, teacher, and group facilitator for teens, gay men, sex workers, and immigrants.

He runs a dojo in Berkeley. He is a wonderful person and his contact information can be located at:
http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/GLBTAikido/message/237

Amos Hee just recently left a position with The Byron Bay, New South Wales Australia organization known as INTRA
(Insight Network Treatment Axis), a community outreach program
offering preventive relapse support and services for people with
drug and/or alcohol problems. Amos is an aikido dan who once operated his own dojo.

http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/GLBTAikido/message/279
http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/GLBTAikido/message/239

I no longer have his email address but his personal website is:
http://www.friendster.com/1372635

Amos has also published. You might find his writings through google.

Hope that helps.

Regards,

Mary Eastland
04-22-2007, 04:15 PM
I wrote a book called self-defense for everyday that is based on Aikido principles. I could send you a copy if you like.
Mary

Aran Bright
04-23-2007, 04:38 AM
Hello Aran,

Philip Huang Sensei has worked extensively in the health education and HIV prevention field, as a counselor, teacher, and group facilitator for teens, gay men, sex workers, and immigrants.

He runs a dojo in Berkeley. He is a wonderful person and his contact information can be located at:
http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/GLBTAikido/message/237

Amos Hee just recently left a position with The Byron Bay, New South Wales Australia organization known as INTRA
(Insight Network Treatment Axis), a community outreach program
offering preventive relapse support and services for people with
drug and/or alcohol problems. Amos is an aikido dan who once operated his own dojo.

http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/GLBTAikido/message/279
http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/GLBTAikido/message/239

I no longer have his email address but his personal website is:
http://www.friendster.com/1372635

Amos has also published. You might find his writings through google.

Hope that helps.

Regards,

Thanks you David, I'll get in touch shortly :)

Aran Bright
04-23-2007, 04:41 AM
I wrote a book called self-defense for everyday that is based on Aikido principles. I could send you a copy if you like.
Mary

Wow, thank you. I'll PM you for details.

jennifer paige smith
04-23-2007, 08:34 AM
Thank you for replying to this thread.

What are the core principles that you maintain to allow the healing to occur rather than further damage. I know when someone who is ready to face there demons are already very unsettled to begin with how can stop from making it worse?

In a certain respect, I feel we are not equipped and it is not our job to TRY to heal people (not that you are saying we should). Ellis Amdur wrote a good article on this. From my own experience traveling down the road of aikido after a life with abuse and neglect, and from my own experience teaching , I find that Aikido itself heals. On a very real level the seen and unseen elements of practice rise to meet the injured person in a way that we ourselves could very possibly never concieve. Well structured practice, adhering to the movements and approaching the mat with total sincerity are a few of the tools of practice that have helped to support healing in my travel.In my experience the waza is the greatest healer. As long as we keep aikido in our eyes first, above all else, we will provide healthy opportunities for people to discover their healing process in or out of Aikido.

In my work with at-risk teens the single greatest tool has been the courage to be really myself, to say the 'wrong' thing, to tell the truth as I see it, to be honest in my own struggles and to get out of the way of Aikido as it is transmitted through me from the teachings of my teachers. Because I don't sell salvation we all have to work together to find our paths. The students respect this ultimately and many become helpers in life because of it.

Aran Bright
04-23-2007, 05:28 PM
In a certain respect, I feel we are not equipped and it is not our job to TRY to heal people (not that you are saying we should). Ellis Amdur wrote a good article on this. From my own experience traveling down the road of aikido after a life with abuse and neglect, and from my own experience teaching , I find that Aikido itself heals. On a very real level the seen and unseen elements of practice rise to meet the injured person in a way that we ourselves could very possibly never concieve. Well structured practice, adhering to the movements and approaching the mat with total sincerity are a few of the tools of practice that have helped to support healing in my travel.In my experience the waza is the greatest healer. As long as we keep aikido in our eyes first, above all else, we will provide healthy opportunities for people to discover their healing process in or out of Aikido.

In my work with at-risk teens the single greatest tool has been the courage to be really myself, to say the 'wrong' thing, to tell the truth as I see it, to be honest in my own struggles and to get out of the way of Aikido as it is transmitted through me from the teachings of my teachers. Because I don't sell salvation we all have to work together to find our paths. The students respect this ultimately and many become helpers in life because of it.

Hi Jennifer,
That is a really good point to remember for anyone that is involved in health, whether it be mental or physical, just do your thing, enjoy it, do it well and people may be able to heal themselves as a result.

Having the courage to say the wrong things and make mistakes is pretty much the 'right' thing to do, as far as I see it.
:D

Aran

SeiserL
04-23-2007, 06:45 PM
The territory doesn't change.
The map does.

Acceptance and compassion heal.

Walk towards the future positive solution instead of just avoiding the past negative problem. See the big picture and do what you already know is right.

Aikido is a different map that better prevents, manages, and resolves conflict on the same territory.

Aikibu
04-24-2007, 08:53 AM
I have recently begun to teach aikido to groups involved in alcohol and drug rehabilitation and was wanting to know if there is anyone else out there with experience with this sort of thing.

Been Clean & Sober 19 years and I have been working in or around Rehabs for over 17 years. I have had allot of success with Aikido principles and techniques especially with at risk kids.

Let me know if I can help. :)

William Hazen

Marie Noelle Fequiere
04-24-2007, 02:15 PM
Let me take advantage of this thread to point to the fact that martial arts in general attract people who have problems, but they will not always tell the head instructor upon signing up. I think it is very important for a martial art instructor to learn to decipher symptoms - they can be very subttle - of spychological distress in a student, and also what the proper course of action - say in the case of an abused child - is, or the proper way to help the student with his or her issues.
I just wonder if this is a requirement for openning a martial art school in some countries.

Aran Bright
04-26-2007, 02:46 AM
Let me take advantage of this thread to point to the fact that martial arts in general attract people who have problems, but they will not always tell the head instructor upon signing up. I think it is very important for a martial art instructor to learn to decipher symptoms - they can be very subttle - of spychological distress in a student, and also what the proper course of action - say in the case of an abused child - is, or the proper way to help the student with his or her issues.
I just wonder if this is a requirement for openning a martial art school in some countries.

Hi Marie,

It's a really good point that you make. I wonder if someone could suggest what may be an appropriate course of action for someone who may be at risk?
What if they are putting others at risk?

Aran

SeiserL
04-26-2007, 07:04 AM
I wonder if someone could suggest what may be an appropriate course of action for someone who may be at risk? What if they are putting others at risk?
IMHO, here is where we get into really deep and really hot water. Martial arts training is not a substitute of competent psychological assessment, intervention, and treatment. I think a basic understanding of issues may be helpful to let people know when they are way over their heads.

That may be an interesting project for some of us to play way: a brief collaborative paper geared towards teachers.

Aikibu
04-26-2007, 09:29 AM
IMHO, here is where we get into really deep and really hot water.

Not in my experiance as a peer counselor...99% of this interaction occurs within a structured environment. Aikido "principles (not Martial Arts) of blending and harmony have been cited many times (heck Lynn I'll bet you use them yourself. :) ) as a valued tool in building trust between the "client" and the folks trying to help him recover/get him to admit he/she has a problem. I do agree there is a methodology to it and it works within a structured Professional "Treament Plan". :)

Martial arts training is not a substitute of competent psychological assessment, intervention, and treatment. I think a basic understanding of issues may be helpful to let people know when they are way over their heads.

While not a subsitute it can be a powerful tool. Again I am speaking of Aikido principles NOT Martial Arts training. There is a big differance. I have done scores of 12 step interventions over the years' and worked on Skid Row, The VA, The California Prison System, and other places, and Aikido has served me very very well. That being said I am not a licensed Professional and you are absolutely right in regard to those aspects of treatment that Demand a Competent Professional as required by law and professional ethics.

Aikido principles are not a substitute for treatment. They can be used as a bridge to build trust between peers, as a tool for conflict resolution, and as a set of basic ideals to help folks who are prone to confrontation resolve it in a way which does not harm them or the object of thier fear/anger.

That may be an interesting project for some of us to play way: a brief collaborative paper geared towards teachers.

I would love to participate and learn for you guys. I have used Ellis Amdur's and Terry Dobson's insights for years with great effect. Amdur Sensei has spent many many years in the field of conflict resolution. Perhaps we can ask him for his insight on the subject of Aiki principles and how they can be used to help at risk kids. :)

William Hazen

SeiserL
04-26-2007, 03:58 PM
(heck Lynn I'll bet you use them yourself. :) )
Yes, absolutely I do. I often apply Aikido principles to my treatment planning and sessions. I am probably more effective and efficient there than on the mat. That direction is easy.

My point is that the normal average strip-mall Aikido instructor, in the process of teaching a waza in class, is not prepared, educated, oriented, or equipped in viewing or doing it as a psychotherapeutic process. Nor should they be expected to be. I don't necessarily think that the mat alone is the place to workout our personal problems.

I do believe that Aikido is a great adjunct to treatment. I often refer and recommend it as part of a more holistic approach.

SteveTrinkle
04-26-2007, 05:13 PM
[QUOTE=Marie Noelle Fequiere;176471]Let me take advantage of this thread to point to the fact that martial arts in general attract people who have problems..."

Also, the martial arts often attract people who are seeking positive solutions for their problems....

Aikibu
04-26-2007, 06:05 PM
Thanks Lynn though I would like it if you would define "Strip Mall Instructor" since I have known several Dojo's that were located in "Strip Malls" whose instructors had both wisdom and experiance. :)

Thanks Steve...Aikido is a Way or solution to what one is "seeking"
Not a haven for the problem focused but a refuge for those interested in a solution. Otherwise you don't last long in our Aikido.

William Hazen

PS. I can only speak for myself of course but the "effectiveness" of one's Aikido is measured in ones daily life outside of the Dojo. The Dojo is a place to learn how to live Aikido in our daily lives.IMHO there is a Big differance between practice and application, and I strive for symbiotic harmony between the two. :)

SeiserL
04-27-2007, 06:25 AM
Thanks Lynn though I would like it if you would define "Strip Mall Instructor" since I have known several Dojo's that were located in "Strip Malls" whose instructors had both wisdom and experiance. :)

IMHO there is a Big differance between practice and application, and I strive for symbiotic harmony between the two. :)
For sake of conversation and communication, generalities are used and "never" represent universals. There are always exceptions to the rules, and that's a rule that is "always" true. I trained in a "strip-mall-dojo" under a truly great master. But, in my experience, he was an exception.

Yes, practice and application are different. And yes, the symbiotic harmonizing of dualities has "always" been the way of the mystic and healing. There is no either/or.

Aikibu
04-27-2007, 08:08 AM
For sake of conversation and communication, generalities are used and "never" represent universals. There are always exceptions to the rules, and that's a rule that is "always" true. I trained in a "strip-mall-dojo" under a truly great master. But, in my experience, he was an exception.

Yes, practice and application are different. And yes, the symbiotic harmonizing of dualities has "always" been the way of the mystic and healing. There is no either/or.

Thanks for the reply AikiBrother. I confess I was hinting a little bit regarding the location of your great teacher's Dojo in my question. :)

To sum up from my experiance A background in Aikido or some form of conflict resolution is a great asset to have if you desire to help people. :) Practice Hard and keep your Heart open.

William Hazen

Marie Noelle Fequiere
04-27-2007, 09:15 AM
[QUOTE=Marie Noelle Fequiere;176471]Let me take advantage of this thread to point to the fact that martial arts in general attract people who have problems..."

Also, the martial arts often attract people who are seeking positive solutions for their problems....

I totally agree with that. But can you imagine a woman stepping in a dojo and saying: "You know, Sensei, I have been rapped, so I think that I need to learn to defend myself"? Or a kid may be nagging his parents for martial arts training without telling them that he is the playground's bully's favorite victim.
An instructor might lose his patience because a student just doesn't seem to be developping any sparing skills - especially in an art like Karate or Tae Kwon Do - in spite of learning everything else right. If this instructor has no idea that this sutdent has been the victim of a violent assault, he or she can make things a lot worst for the victim.
So I repeat, a martial arts instructor needs to be able to see symptoms of spychological trauma in a student. He or she might then have a private talk with this student, and, if needed, advise professional counseling. Meanwhile, this instructor's job is to modulate his or her teaching methods according to this student's special needs.
This is the way to be a good instructor.

Aran Bright
04-30-2007, 06:10 PM
[QUOTE=Stephen Trinkle;176695]

I totally agree with that. But can you imagine a woman stepping in a dojo and saying: "You know, Sensei, I have been rapped, so I think that I need to learn to defend myself"? Or a kid may be nagging his parents for martial arts training without telling them that he is the playground's bully's favorite victim.
An instructor might lose his patience because a student just doesn't seem to be developping any sparing skills - especially in an art like Karate or Tae Kwon Do - in spite of learning everything else right. If this instructor has no idea that this sutdent has been the victim of a violent assault, he or she can make things a lot worst for the victim.
So I repeat, a martial arts instructor needs to be able to see symptoms of spychological trauma in a student. He or she might then have a private talk with this student, and, if needed, advise professional counseling. Meanwhile, this instructor's job is to modulate his or her teaching methods according to this student's special needs.
This is the way to be a good instructor.

I agree with you Marie, but how would a good instructor approach the subject of talking to someone they thought had a problem, so that you might suggest that they need further help?

Marie Noelle Fequiere
05-02-2007, 02:14 PM
[QUOTE=Marie Noelle Fequiere;176748]

I agree with you Marie, but how would a good instructor approach the subject of talking to someone they thought had a problem, so that you might suggest that they need further help?

This is exactly what worries me. I am not a spychologist. All I know is that this should definitely happen in private, let's say that Sensei justs tells the student that he needs to have a word with him in his office. Now, the student may not be willing to talk about this particular subject. Sensei will need to use a lot of tact, and, if he fails, he will at least know for sure now that this particular student does have a problem. Winning the student's trust can take time and patience. But at least, Sensei will be carefull to modulate his teaching methods and have extra patience with this particular student.
Could anyone out there with a knowledge in psychology step in?

Aran Bright
05-17-2007, 03:59 AM
Hi Mary,

Thanks for the book that you sent me. I have found it very interesting. I haven't read it cover to cover but just flick through it now and again and have found some good ideas for self defence training and insights into the psyche of someone going through the process of tackling physical and psychological battles.
It is a very honest book, it must have taken a lot of guts to put that out there.
I have passed into to a friend of mine who teaches peace class at university, mostly to future teachers. She has found it very useful also.
I would recommend it to anyone, but especially women who are going through the process of empowering and protecting themselves.

Kind Regards,

Aran Bright

Avery Jenkins
05-17-2007, 12:45 PM
Always build in a security anchor, sense many of the trance states associated with meditation work can be triggers for the defense mechanism trance states.

Slide above their life time line and find a time before they had problems. Who and where were they? How did they do that then? Slide forward to the future, ask them to do it again.

Enter, blend, and redirect. Pace, pace, pace, lead.


Do I detect the influence of Bandler and Grinder in that post?

SeiserL
05-17-2007, 03:30 PM
Do I detect the influence of Bandler and Grinder in that post?
Trained and certified by none other.

Lambdadragon
05-22-2007, 11:04 PM
Hello Aran,

Stephen Trinkle is an Addiction Counselor at a residential, dual diagnosis rehab in Sellersville, Pennsylvania. With the help of Donald Levine, he began introducing Aiki principles into his work with rehab clients back in 1999. The program offers aikido training to adults with addictions and comorbid mental illnesses who express interest.

Here is a link to his article:

http://www.aiki-extensions.org/pubs/aen6.doc

and a link to his website:

http://www.aikidokenkyukai.org

Regards,
David

Angela Dunn
05-23-2007, 05:17 AM
Let me take advantage of this thread to point to the fact that martial arts in general attract people who have problems, but they will not always tell the head instructor upon signing up. I think it is very important for a martial art instructor to learn to decipher symptoms - they can be very subttle - of spychological distress in a student, and also what the proper course of action - say in the case of an abused child - is, or the proper way to help the student with his or her issues.
I just wonder if this is a requirement for openning a martial art school in some countries.

In the case of an Abused Child, anyone who is working with children, paid or on a voluntary basis, legally has to be trained in child protection which does cover symptoms of abuse, so that would cover anyone who is teaching children Martal Arts. There is also a piece of goverment legislation stating that everyone who deals with children has to read a copy of a book Titled "What to do if youre worried a child is being abused". So basically yes that type of awareness is a legal requirement and if you are concerned then you are supposed to refair them onto social services. However that is just for England, but I would be suprised if other countries did not have similar laws.

SteveTrinkle
05-23-2007, 11:53 AM
Hello Aran,

Stephen Trinkle is an Addiction Counselor at a residential, dual diagnosis rehab in Sellersville, Pennsylvania. With the help of Donald Levine, he began introducing Aiki principles into his work with rehab clients back in 1999. The program offers aikido training to adults with addictions and comorbid mental illnesses who express interest.

Here is a link to his article:

http://www.aiki-extensions.org/pubs/aen6.doc

and a link to his website:

http://www.aikidokenkyukai.org

Regards,
David

Sorry all, that url is out of date. New website is www.aikidokenkyukaipennsylvania.org but I don't have any of my work-related info there. If anyone would like to e-mail me, I'd be very happy to talk about some of the things I've been playing around with.

Regards,
Steve

Kieran Barrett
05-28-2007, 06:51 AM
Hi. I'm Kieran from ireland. I've just been reading your posts in relation to Aiki principles and their possible positive implications for work with adictions. I am a Social Worker working with homeless adolescents and I come across all sorts of addictions in my work and the one thing that remains a constant is the underlying anger hiding beneath the mask of addiction. I try to utilise my Aiki when working with addicts as it helps me to 'blend' with the issues involved and 'lead' those I work with to a better place. I would be very interested to read your thoughts on this matter.

Kieran