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arvin m.
08-23-2001, 06:16 AM
Hi everyone!
How does one "put ki" into his atemi? How do u feel this ki? Does one cultivate it thru breathing exercises? Does one exhale when striking? And should we relax when applying atemi or should we use force?

Sorry for the numerous questions but i had to get them off my chest...

MikeE
08-23-2001, 08:31 AM
Train on a Makwara. This will teach you how to focus ki, and use your body mechanics correctly. Before finding Aikido, I trained in Ryukyu Kempo for many years. I still use this training to help my students improve their striking speed, control, and power.

Best of Luck

L. Camejo
08-23-2001, 01:09 PM
Originally posted by arvin m.
Hi everyone!
How does one "put ki" into his atemi? How do u feel this ki? Does one cultivate it thru breathing exercises? Does one exhale when striking? And should we relax when applying atemi or should we use force?

Sorry for the numerous questions but i had to get them off my chest...

Hi Arvin,

Ki can be cultivated through breathing and visualisation exercises as practiced in Qigong (pronounced Chi Kung), yoga and Tai Chi. Some internet research on basic exercises from these systems can give you an idea on how its done.

Its generally appreciated that exhalation while striking helps with ki extension. In general, a relaxed body transmits ki better than a tense one (so I've been told). As such I tend to use Taoist (Qigong) ki extension principles when doing atemi. The body is relaxed and charged with ki flowing from your centre from the beginning of the striking motion almost to the point of impact (relaxed, yin) and at the moment of impact the striking point is tensed focussing your ki into it(tension, yang). After the moment of impact, one immediately returns to a relaxed state (yin again).

For a bit more information check out this link http://www.scottshaw.com/kiarticle/

I hope this helps.
L.C.:ai::ki:

Jim23
08-23-2001, 02:04 PM
Originally posted by L. Camejo


As such I tend to use Taoist (Qigong) ki extension principles when doing atemi. The body is relaxed and charged with ki flowing from your centre from the beginning of the striking motion almost to the point of impact (relaxed, yin) and at the moment of impact the striking point is tensed focussing your ki into it(tension, yang). After the moment of impact, one immediately returns to a relaxed state (yin again).

This is 100% on the mark. And ... oh, a little kiai could also come in handy. ;)

However, as to extending ki ... not sure about that one, although I did have an experience (way) back in my karate days.

After training for about two or three years, I remember my instructor calling me up on stage (yes, there was a stage at the front of the class, which was great for demos) to show the class a few techniques with him. Just a series of punches and kicks with the other guy blocking and then returning the favour.

My instructor was a very strong, solid type with excellent technique - quite scary, actually. Anyway, to make a short story even shorter, I found that as he (lounged) punched and (thrust) kicked at me, I had no trouble blocking him completely (an almost impossible feat) and as I punched then kicked, etc., he couldn't move my arms or legs (really my whole body). He was almost as surprised as I was.

I still can't explain it. And it felt damn good.

Whenever I go to my car and press the little button on the key, and the end flips (extends) out, I tell my wife that I've just extended key. (That was pretty bad, and it's not even Friday.) :D:D

Jim23

mariko nakamura
08-25-2001, 08:27 AM
Hi Arvin.
I think the best way for you to develop your ki is to not think about developing your ki.
I think you should practice your atemis with proper form being the most important. Next maybe would be to work on releasing all of your strength in your muscles. Try to feel no tension anywhere in your body. Your focus point should be the core of the body. And remember to keep your breathing fluid. Please do not be urgent to discover your ki because you might miss it. But do remember that ki is already with you. Otherwise you wouldnt exist.

arvin m.
08-27-2001, 07:58 AM
And how might u suggets i keep my breathing fluid? Anything that works for u? When do u exhale and stuff?

Steve Speicher
08-27-2001, 08:33 AM
When do u exhale and stuff?

After I'm done inhaling??

Chuck.Gordon
08-27-2001, 10:35 AM
Originally posted by arvin m.
>How does one "put ki" into his atemi?

How do you not? Ki is not some mystical power that you suck up and then expel. Ki is all around us, all the time. It's potential. It's focused energy. It's being centered and moving from the center. It's coordinating mind and body, not using some mysterious, magical energy. Ki is a simple, common Japanese term that is much abused in some circles, that doesn't really mean anything like some interpretations of it would have us believe.

>How do u feel this ki?

Are you alive? You are feeling ki. Do you move, interact, breathe? You're feeling ki.

>Does one cultivate it thru breathing exercises?

Proper breathing can enhance anything you do. Trying to devlop ki through breathing is missing huge parts of the equation (and the idea of being able to _develop_ ki in the first place, IMHO, is probably not even in the right area of mathematics, for that matter).

>Does one exhale when striking?

Yes.

>And should we relax when applying atemi or should we use force?

Yes. One explanation is that application of aiki in atemi is very much a function of expansion and contraction. Relaxed delivery, focused energy upon contact, relaxed recovery.

To _me_, the idea of using ki in those terms is a bit odd. Of COURSE you use ki. If you don't, you do nothing.

Chasing the esoterica of aikido (or any budo) is kind of like playing with a willful kitten. Chase it and it eludes you, jut do what you do and it'll come to ya ...

Chuck Gordon