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Dom_Shodan
06-26-2006, 07:01 PM
Hi all, my name is Dom. Im posting this thread to determine how many aikido practitioners believe that developing the spiritual aspect and understanding the philosophy of Aikido, is just as important as developing the physical skill. I see a great deal of Aikido Schools focusing on mechanical advantage and force. Whilst my dojo nurtures both physical and spiritual, since receiving my black belt, I have made it a personal study to understand the spiritual aspect and philosophy as it is a big part of training. Without the spirit behind your technique, you will never reach the full potential of your Aikido. I would appreciate your thoughts everyone!
:ai: :ki: :do:

shadowhyrst
06-27-2006, 07:52 PM
I'm a practioner of the mind--that is, the philosophical side of the art, more than the physical since I am somewhat handicapped, therefore my interest and focus is more the spiritual/philosophical side.

dps
06-27-2006, 10:04 PM
I'm a practioner of the mind--that is, the philosophical side of the art, more than the physical since I am somewhat handicapped, therefore my interest and focus is more the spiritual/philosophical side.
Can you use the memories of past physical activities to study the psychological and spiritual parts of Aikido?

Aiki LV
06-28-2006, 02:54 PM
Hello,
Everyone has different reasons for practicing aikido. In the beginning many people focus strictly on technique. Eventually as you become more experienced you learn that there is more to the art than just technique. I personally believe that you limit yourself when you only practice physical technique. Aikido is meant to develop a person physically and spiritually. Each aspect develops the other. As far as I'm concerned you have to gain knowledge of both to really be practicing aikido. If you have no spirit and just focus on the physical aspects your movement will be empty. You can only get so skilled at technique, then what? In order to grow as an aikidoka both aspects are necessary or as far as I'm concerned you cannot achieve your full potential. For that matter, I don't even think you can have an understanding of the art itself without both. These are my thoughts on the subject hopefully I'm on the right track. :) I'm sure those who disagree will set me straight. ;)

Erick Mead
06-28-2006, 03:32 PM
I'm a practioner of the mind--that is, the philosophical side of the art, more than the physical since I am somewhat handicapped, therefore my interest and focus is more the spiritual/philosophical side. Don't give up just because of that -- I have myself taught some useful aikido to a student who was a recent double leg amputee and had not yet gained great proficiency with prosthetics. It amazed me how much he could potentially still do when I got over my mental block and started adapting techniques to the fact that he was basically in permanent suwari.

There is a lady in California (Molly Hale, I think) that took her Sandan test in a wheelchair.

Cordially,
Erick Mead

Erick Mead
06-28-2006, 04:45 PM
I'm a practioner of the mind--that is, the philosophical side of the art, more than the physical since I am somewhat handicapped, therefore my interest and focus is more the spiritual/philosophical side. Don't give up just because of that -- I have myself taught some useful aikido to a student who was a recent double leg amputee and had not yet gained great proficiency with prosthetics. It amazed me how much he could potentially still do when I got over my mental block and started adapting techniques to the fact that he was basically in permanent suwari.

There is a lady in California (Molly Hale, I think) that took her Sandan test in a wheelchair.

Cordially,
Erick Mead

dps
07-01-2006, 09:50 PM
I'm a practioner of the mind--that is, the philosophical side of the art, more than the physical since I am somewhat handicapped, therefore my interest and focus is more the spiritual/philosophical side.

Aikido is only one Way. There are many Ways that does not require as much physical ability as Aikido. Without knowing your restrictions, two of the Japanese Ways that come to mind are calligraphy (Shodo) and painting.
My feeling is that any of these Ways have the same principle of body, mind, spirit connection that would fit with your study of Aikido.
I hope this is a help.

Thalib
07-05-2006, 02:03 AM
There are good articles in the Aikido Journal that discuss this.

http://www.aikidojournal.com/article.php?articleID=107&highlight=inaba

The above link is an interview with Inaba-sensei. It's lengthy, but it does give me a bit of insight.