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DH
05-26-2006, 08:15 AM
Blade Runner is one of my favorites as well. I think many of us wished for an excellent follow up.
The un-edited DVD was worth it. Great speech by Rutgar, then.....Kaputz.


Dan

Ron Tisdale
05-26-2006, 08:16 AM
Hamlet, anyone?

;)
B,
R

Mike Sigman
05-26-2006, 08:19 AM
Hamlet, anyone?With egglets and toast, please.

MM
05-26-2006, 09:02 AM
RE: Bladerunner

Great movie.

The main reason I never bought the DVD was because it's the "Director's Cut" version with no voice over. I thought the voice over was great and a better version.

What does the unedited DVD have?

Mark

Neil Mick
05-26-2006, 11:15 PM
Blade Runner is one of my favorites as well. I think many of us wished for an excellent follow up.
The un-edited DVD was worth it. Great speech by Rutgar, then.....Kaputz.


Dan

I have a great visceral memory, involving the "Director's Cut" of "Blade Runner..."

1992. The poster, "Blade Runner: the Director's Cut," playing at the Castro Theatre, emblazoned in front of me, in a coffee-shop.

The Castro: (http://www.thecastrotheatre.com/history.html) one of the most magnificant theatre's I've had the pleasure to sit in. Art Deco design; a huge theatre in the heart of the Castro District, San Francisco. On some nights, the movie is preceeded by an organist, who disappears through a trapdoor into the floor.

I'd been living in SF for about nine months. This movie experience was a real testament to the reason for my move.

Sitting up in the balcony and watching this great movie: with my lover who travelled across the country with me, watching the Director's Cut on this huge screen, from the balcony in an elegant, Art Deco theatre...whoah. :cool:

P.S. IMO, the voice-over kills the power of the film. And the last scene in the original was tacked-on scene-footage from The Shining, to please the suits.

tedehara
07-12-2006, 10:46 AM
If you compare the original story with the film, they are worlds apart. P.K. Dick's 1968 novel "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" talks about environmental destruction and extinction of species. The film's screenplay, originally "Dangerous Days and Android" by Hampton Fancher, and later supplemented by David Peoples, is a rehash of the New Testament with Rutger Hauer's character "Roy Batty" playing the Satan/Christ clone.

With it's film noir style and it's ability to stick to a theme, it remains the benchmark that other Sci Fi films need to judge themselves by. All of this without space ships and creepy monsters.