PDA

View Full Version : BJJ for Aikidoka Instructional DVD


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


Roy Dean
05-09-2006, 02:00 PM
All,

I'm considering starting production on a BJJ instructional DVD specifically geared toward Aikidoka. Some of the chapters I'd like to include are:

An overview of the positions in BJJ and common terminology.

Basic BJJ techniques for overall awareness (armlocks, bent armlocks, triangle, hand chokes, and footlocks)

The importance of ukemi, how it relates to ground movement, and how BJJ is more a method of movement than a syllabus of techniques

Demonstrations of aikido techniques with immediate transitions into groundwork.


The emphasis of the instructional would be to help Aikidoka conceptualize what BJJ is, and how it closely the 2 arts are related. I have several ideas on how to accomplish this, but would like to get your input on what you'd be interested in seeing, and what the most pressing questions are that you'd like addressed. Any and all input is welcome!

Sincerely,

Roy Dean

www.jiaiaikido.com
www.royharris.com

Lyle Bogin
05-09-2006, 02:07 PM
The thing I find most fascinating about BBJ, and the thing that links it well to aikido I think, is the incredible way BJJists understand positional advantage. It is from this central point that I would love to see a comparative analysis.

Good luck!

Ron Tisdale
05-09-2006, 02:09 PM
Sounds like a good project, good luck, and I hope it goes well. Post when complete...I may purchase a copy.

Best,
Ron

nathansnow
05-09-2006, 02:19 PM
I like the idea, should be a great instructional video.
I would like to see BJJ escapes from BJJ takedowns and locks.

Budd
05-09-2006, 02:20 PM
Hi Roy,

Sent you a PM.

MikeE
05-09-2006, 02:22 PM
Having studied both for quite a long time, I think it's a good idea. When I am teaching aikido ground defenses, I always use what the BJJ trained person would be looking for, and how to prevent them from getting it.

I acclimated to BJJ quickly because it very much is like Aikido on ground for me.

Aristeia
05-09-2006, 02:49 PM
excellent idea Roy - I've contemplated the same thing myself but was just waiting for the competency to kick in :)
I think aikidoka are fertile ground for bjj concepts once they realise it's so similar. Relating the importance of moving (shrimping/shoulder escape etc etc -> irimi, tenkan etc etc). Blending with what the opponent gives you. The concept that it's not the end result (throw, lock, choke etc) that's important but the events leading up to it (off the line, off balancing, leading/positional dominance).

I find there's also areas of cross over when teacing. For example when coaching aikidoka on armbar from guard i make the point that the leg cuts the head down to keep control, much like Kaiten nage. the importance of the different levers on the body, hips, shoulders. There's a lot in BJJ that attacks the sholders for posture (eg spider guard) that is reminiscent of tenchi nage. The list goes on and on.
Be keen to see it when it's finished.

DonMagee
05-09-2006, 03:01 PM
I'd like to see a video/book on using aiki priciples and techniques to help my bjj training. Especially take downs, sweeps, and pins/control. I really can't seem to apply aiki techniques in sparing with the exception of the occasional ikkyo or a grab. I just end up clinching and doing a judo/bjj style takedown. Ways to help lead the bjj practioner, ways to counter common takedowns and movements from bjj, etc. My only fear would be becoming too much style vs style and not really focus on how to blend the two.

Budd
05-09-2006, 03:12 PM
I like what others said about the two arts going after the same objective. When I'm practicing aikido, I try to work on using "just enough of the correct application" force that I can apply the technique (using correct form, etc.). When I'm really on, I can take whatever amount of energy uke gives me and get "something".

Funny thing is, when I've been rolling for submission and get really tired, I don't "have" any raw force left to make a submission work and have to rely on technique and timing to "catch" the other person (which you learn to do by feeling where the other person is directing their intention, strength, balance, etc. -- does this remind anyone of any art other than BJJ?!!!). When I'm really on, I can take whatever juice my training partner gives me and get "something"!

Waitasec, nevermind, there's no similarities at all to see here . . . everyone move along . . .

Roy Dean
05-09-2006, 03:16 PM
Thank you for the input guys. Keep it coming!

Thanks for the PM, Bud. GREAT ideas.



Don Magee,

It takes awhile to develop the sensitivity and timing to pull off Aiki techniques. Keep going. Things should start clicking at purple belt, using your opponents momentum to a far greater extent, coupled with combinations of techniques to flow around stiff resistance. Remember this: Always use JUST ENOUGH strength, and you'll be able to feel the opportunities your opponent gives you much more quickly.

Best,

Roy

Budd
05-09-2006, 03:20 PM
Glad you like them, Roy. I'll look forward to seeing what you put together.

Aristeia
05-09-2006, 04:18 PM
Roy would you say at purple belt you are catching Aikido "techniques" or are simply more able to apply aikido prinicipals? I think some people make the mistake of thinking "applying aikido in a grappling situation" means coming up with an ikkyo or a kote gaeshi. What's your thinking here?

Roy Dean
05-09-2006, 04:45 PM
I would say that at purple, you're comfortable enough with your technical repertoire to implement Aikido principles. This may or may not include Aikido techniques like kotegaeshi, it depends on what your "game" consists of and which are your favored techniques. I wouldn't expect to do a kata quality kotegaeshi or ikkyo or anything quite like that. If you hunt for it too hard, you'll tip off your partner and things won't roll together smoothly. At purple, you're comfortable enough to just allow your partner to offer an exposure or opening, then capitalize on that with your desired technique(s), which may be from Aikido, Aiki-jujutsu, or jujutsu. You're able to do more by "trying" less!

Kevin Leavitt
05-09-2006, 05:14 PM
Great idea! I second many of the comments you guys have made.

My only concern would be that for many aikidoka...there is the danger of becoming too technique based in the application of BJJ. That was the hardest thing for me to reconcile.

An inexperienced aikidoka could grow very confused and frustrated in looking at a principle based practice (aikido) and trying to integrate a technical based practice (BJJ).

That said, I have had the same experiences you guys have had. They are complementary and I did progress fairly rapidly to my first blue stripe because of my aikido background.

DonMagee
05-09-2006, 06:46 PM
Thank you for the input guys. Keep it coming!

Thanks for the PM, Bud. GREAT ideas.



Don Magee,

It takes awhile to develop the sensitivity and timing to pull off Aiki techniques. Keep going. Things should start clicking at purple belt, using your opponents momentum to a far greater extent, coupled with combinations of techniques to flow around stiff resistance. Remember this: Always use JUST ENOUGH strength, and you'll be able to feel the opportunities your opponent gives you much more quickly.

Best,

Roy

Thanks for the suggestion. I know I have a long way to go in both aikido and judo. I'm sure it will come together with time.

Its true what was said too about hunting for techniques. I can always tell when someone is hunting for something, and it makes it easy to defend. I know I fall prey to that as well and try to make a technique work.

SeiserL
05-09-2006, 09:35 PM
Check out the Toga Sensei Practical Aikido tapes, there is some ground work.

Also Jason DeLucia's Combat Aikido series includes some.

One of the Macado brothers did a seminar at the last Aiki Expo. Well attended and received.