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Ron Tisdale
03-30-2006, 11:18 AM
Hi All,

It looks like I'll be in Paris from April 20 to 30. I'm looking for a dojo to train in once or maybe twice...nothing crazy, just put on a white belt and follow along. The following link is to a dojo near where I will be staying with Iwama Ryu lineage:

http://aikido-france.net/club/gif/

I did send an email, but got no response. Is anyone aware of any other dojo in that area?

Best,
Ron

Nick Simpson
03-30-2006, 11:20 AM
Get the ferry over here dude!

billybob
03-30-2006, 12:37 PM
Ron,

just walk up, or ask the concierge at the hotel you will be at. i have found they can read a phone book and even work those crazy european telephones!

david

deepsoup
03-30-2006, 12:49 PM
Hi Ron,

I'm not sure whereabouts in the city he's based, but there's an absolutely top notch Shodokan instructor in Paris. (Who also happens to be a lovely guy.)

His name is Satoru Tsuchiya, and his e-mail address is:
tsuchiyasgmk - at - free - dot - fr
(Munged to keep it safe from the spambots)

Sean
x

Ron Tisdale
03-30-2006, 12:51 PM
Right, well, personally, I always like to introduce myself by email or mail first, before I show up. I've always found that courtesy to pay benefits. They know who this guy is walking in, and everyone feels a bit more at ease. My GF is French, so reading the phone book and using the phone is no big deal...I just like to give advance notice.

Best,
Ron

PS I'm not saying that this is the best or only way...just that it is the way I was trained / raised, and it has worked well for me.

Ron Tisdale
03-30-2006, 12:53 PM
Thanks Sean! I'll drop him a note! Do you know how his english is?

Best,
R

Don_Modesto
03-30-2006, 02:24 PM
....just put on a white belt and follow along.

Why's that?

Demoting oneself been a double-edged sword in my experience. Some people don't take it as humility so much as trickiness. Have you done it before, Ron?

Just curious.

Ron Tisdale
03-30-2006, 02:54 PM
Hi Don,

When I go to the Daito ryu seminars, I wear a white belt now. I think when I trained with you that time, I wore my brown (I think I was 2nd or 1st kyu then, don't remember). Since I don't have rank in that art / with that group, I don't wear my black belt / hak.

When I introduce myself by mail or email to an aikido group, I let the instructor know that I am a yudansha, and ask that I can wear a white belt, as I don't know their system / training method. Now, if they say "please wear your obi and hakama", then of course I do. Either way, introducing myself ahead of time, gives them plenty of time to consider my background, think about it, and decide ahead of time.

Best,
Ron (I'm really not all *that* sneaky...the light shining off the top of my bald head gives me away... ;) )

N. Delalondre
03-30-2006, 04:18 PM
Hi Ron,

you can try Patricia Guerri's Dojo during your trip : http://perso.wanadoo.fr/aikibukikai/index_en.html

She was an uchi-deshi of Morihiro Saito during 3 years.

You will find adress and email information on the "links" page.

Best regards

David Kai
03-30-2006, 06:52 PM
Hey Ron,

My GF is also a French National ... Bretagne. Although I haven't taken the opportunity to train while in Paris, I try never to miss this really awesome little martial arts shop. It's kind of difficult to find, but most of the locals will know where it is. I really wish I could remember the name for you. Maybe Nicolas knows the shop I am talking about. You have to go into a courtyard and the shop has a long and narrow entrance. Really nice people inside.

Have FUN!!!

AnhXanh
03-30-2006, 11:55 PM
Hi All,

It looks like I'll be in Paris from April 20 to 30.

I guess you know that Christian Tissier's dojo is in Paris. If you have the opportunity to go a few days before the 20. you may want to take part in this: http://www.christiantissier.com/03_stage/images/stage_2006-04-15.pdf This seminar is generally regarded as very very good with a lot of high-ranking French and other European aikidoka participating. You should expect the level to be quite high. If you have the chance, I would highly recommend you to take part in this and it will be a good opportunity to experience some quality French aikido.

Vincennes is actually in Paris and within the Paris Metro system, so it is fairly easy to get to the dojo. You may also visit for regular practice, and I believe Christian is teaching monday and tuesday nights (you might want to e-mail them to confirm this).

You'll find some more information here: http://www.christiantissier.com/01_cercle_tissier/01_cercle_tissier_ad.html

Regards,
Erik

N. Delalondre
03-31-2006, 01:15 AM
Hi David,

Well, I don't know every martial art shop in Paris, maybe you talk about "budostore"? Or "AikidoKa" shop ?

Guy Bellaiche
03-31-2006, 03:41 AM
Hi,

I live in Paris (actually in the suburb) and I practice Shodokan aïkido there.
Actually the dojo is not near the place you are going to live (Gare du Nord, isn't it ?), but you'll find a RER (kind of tube) going there in 20 minutes.
Lessons are wednesday and thursday evening (19.30 till 22.00) and sunday morning 10 till 13).
I don't know about the english of the sensei (because we don't have time to speak a lot during the lessons :) ) but I know about the man, who is really a friendly guy and about his lessons that are very physical and intense.

The Iwama dojo in Paris is located between Gare de L'Est and Gare du Nord, and is open almost all days of the week. There are lessons morning miday and evening. People there are also very friendly.

And you may also want to have a visit to C. Tissier's dojo (aïkikaï), which is kind of institution here in France.

If you are interested I can give you details about the locations of these dojos, and the way and the hours to go there.

Nota : The date you are coming in Paris corresponds to the end of french scholar holidays. So, maybe, the Shodokan dojo will be closed the first week-end.

N. Delalondre
03-31-2006, 03:53 AM
Seems to become a french thread here... ;)

Guy Bellaiche
03-31-2006, 04:03 AM
Especially at this time, when our americans fellows still sleep.

;-)

NagaBaba
03-31-2006, 07:19 AM
Hi All,

It looks like I'll be in Paris from April 20 to 30. I'm looking for a dojo to train in once or maybe twice...nothing crazy, just put on a white belt and follow along. The following link is to a dojo near where I will be staying with Iwama Ryu lineage:

http://aikido-france.net/club/gif/

I did send an email, but got no response. Is anyone aware of any other dojo in that area?

Best,
Ron
Don't be surprise you got not response. Not very many french speak fluently english.

Here is one of the best N.Tamura sensei (aikikai) students -- Jacques Bonemaison.My wife did practice with him, he seems to be very good technically.

Have fune, drink a lot of wine, with chees and the best baguette in the world ;)

Paris Universite Club Aïkikai
17 av Pierre de Coubertin
(M°CITE UNIVERSITAIRE ; Bus PC PORTE DE GENTILLY)
75013 Paris
Teacher: Jacques Bonemaison

CLasses:
Monday : 20h30-22h
Wednesday: 20h30-22h
Saturday : 9h-11h

Tél : BONEMAISON Jacques 01.43.76.65.53
Remarques : Autre contact : Stephane (06.19.95.62.85)

Ron Tisdale
03-31-2006, 07:54 AM
Wow! Where have you guys been hiding?? ;) Thanks all for the tips...aikido is obviously well in Paris. I'll show my GF this thread over the weekend, and we'll decide which ones fit our travel. It's a real shame I'll have to miss the seminar...we don't fly out of Philly until the 20th, and we're already booked, so there's no changes at this date. Thanks also for the emails!

Best,
Ron (Hey Mr. S, aren't you supposed to be in Japan??)

Anne Fournier
03-31-2006, 10:13 AM
Hi Ron -
Just to add another dojo (mine!), aikikai style: you can try the dojo of Jacques Bardet (he's 6th Dan and Tamura's disciple ). It's conveniently located right in the center of Paris (Chatelet) ;Jacques is a very nice sensei and the atmosphere is friendly, mixing a lot of high-ranked aikidoka to beginners. You can check out times at www.copc3.org/web/rubrique.php?id=9
We like it very much to have exotic foreigners! :D
Hope you get the best out of your trip!
All the best,
Anne

Ron Tisdale
03-31-2006, 10:22 AM
Just to make this a little easier, one place where I'll be for a time is Elancourt, postal code 78990. I would love to have an idea how to get to Tissier Sensei's dojo from there. We just bought some maps for our GPS for France, so it's not like we will be flying blind. I'm plugging postal codes into map quest as I type!

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
03-31-2006, 10:25 AM
Hi Anne,

is 75003 the postal code for where you train? Thanks for the link...

B,
R

NagaBaba
03-31-2006, 09:26 PM
Ron (Hey Mr. S, aren't you supposed to be in Japan??)
I'll fly to Japan 13 April to 27 april.

So today 12 and still counting..... :)

deepsoup
04-01-2006, 08:24 AM
Thanks Sean! I'll drop him a note! Do you know how his english is?
Hi Ron,

Sorry about the delay, been a bit of a busy boy...
Mr Tsuchiya gets by in english ok (I don't think he'll have any problem responding to an email in english), though his french is better.

Its starting to look like you could spend the whole trip training and not visit the same dojo twice. :)

Sean
x

David Kai
04-01-2006, 02:06 PM
BUDOSTORE.COM
34 rue de la Montagne Ste Geneviève - 75005 Paris - Tél. 01 44 41 63 33 - Fax 01 55 42 61 11
Ouvert de 10h à 19h30 du lundi au samedi - (Métro, ligne 10 : Maubert Mutualité - RER B : Luxembourg).

Asked the GF and found it on the NET.

Anne Fournier
04-01-2006, 02:40 PM
Well, I think the dojo is in the 1st arrondissement (i.e 75001) but if you cross the street you are in the 3d (75003). I usually train in the other dojo of the same sensei which is in the 20th. I thought you'd like to begin at the Eiffel Tower ;) , go down the Champs Elysees then a bit of the Rue Rivoli :cool: and then a little aikido there at Chatelet-les Halles :D and then a quick visit at the Contemporary Art Museum (called Centre Pompidon) (the colorfoul building with pipes poping out from everywhere close to the dojo), and then back in time to catch the last aikido lesson of the day :)
Then of course if you go to the dojo of the 20th, you can visit a part of Paris that few tourists know :cool: : a very lively neighborhood full of artsy "ateliers", little cafes and an atmosphere of North Africa.

Yes, if you try all the suggested dojos of this thread, you'll know the area in no time!
Hope you have a nice time!

creinig
04-02-2006, 03:23 AM
Well, There's always Muguruza Sensei if you don't mind staying in the Yoshi club :)

http://www.seikeikan.com/Links.htm#France lists the (physical) address, but their homepage seems to be broken. If you want, I can dig out Sensei's email address.

Update: You might be a bit out of luck on the 21.-23. though. He's holding a seminar in Munich during that weekend (which I'm very much looking forward to ;) )

Jeanne Shepard
04-02-2006, 08:58 AM
I recommend a visit to Tissier Sensei' dojo as well. He teaches an advanced class, if I remember, once a week or something like that.

Jeanne

Ron Tisdale
04-03-2006, 08:24 AM
Actually, I'll be asking my teacher about him on Wed.! I haven't ruled anything in or out yet, still collecting info. I'll be in the area until the 30th, so maybe I can catch keiko there after he comes back from the seminar. I had problems with the home page too...an email would be wonderfull!

Best,
Ron
Well, There's always Muguruza Sensei if you don't mind staying in the Yoshi club :)

http://www.seikeikan.com/Links.htm#France lists the (physical) address, but their homepage seems to be broken. If you want, I can dig out Sensei's email address.

Update: You might be a bit out of luck on the 21.-23. though. He's holding a seminar in Munich during that weekend (which I'm very much looking forward to ;) )

Olivier
04-03-2006, 10:18 AM
Hi folks,

David, the shop in a courtyard is probably "BudoStore" (http://www.budostore.com/).
The place is in the heart of Paris in a very cute area.

aikidoKA (http://www.aikidoka.fr/) is a new small shop, dedicated to aikido ;)

Ron, which is your favorite aikido "style" ? In Paris, you will find high-ranked teachers in most of the major aikido styles.
If you are interested in "Iwama style", you can meet Pat. Guerri as suggest by Nicolas.
For Pat. Guerri, she will welcome you and she will be very sensitive if you call/mail her before. We will be very happy to meet you.

If you stay close to Elancourt (far in the west suburbs of Paris), going to Paris for evening classes is not very easy.

Best regards,

Ron Tisdale
04-03-2006, 10:25 AM
Ron, which is your favorite aikido "style" ? In Paris, you will find high-ranked teachers in most of the major aikido styles.

Well, I train mostly in Yoshinkan, but I try to get out and see other things as well. I would like to try an iwama style dojo if possible.

If you are interested in "Iwama style", you can meet Pat. Guerri as suggest by Nicolas.
For Pat. Guerri, she will welcome you and she will be very sensitive if you call/mail her before. We will be very happy to meet you.

Excellent, I'll try to reach out to her. Thanks!

If you stay close to Elancourt (far in the west suburbs of Paris), going to Paris for evening classes is not very easy.

Yes, that's what I understand. The GF and I are still laying out ittenerary, so I'm looking at all my options at this point. I found one iwama dojo near Elancourt, but no response to emal there. I'm sure something will pop up...it always does! ;)

If I do go somewhere in Paris, we'll probably go during day, and just stay through the evening. Maybe even stay overnight in Paris...

Hmm, from the website, looks like a saturday class or a weekday afternoon class would be really great...Thanks!

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
05-01-2006, 07:36 AM
Hi All!

I'm back from France, and what a great trip! I have a review of my experience training with Pat Guerri Sensei one stormy night in Paris, which I'll post as soon as I can. Gotta catch up on email! To all who contributed to the thread, thanks! and sorry I couldn't get to more dojo. To the people who recommended Guerri Sensei, Domo Arigato...

Best,
Ron

Budd
05-01-2006, 09:11 AM
Glad you made it back in one piece and look forward to hearing all about it!

N. Delalondre
05-01-2006, 10:48 AM
Hi Ron,

I hope your keiko at Guerri's Dojo was fine. Sadly I was not there this week (and I think Olivier was in the same case), so I've to wait for your review. Wasn't the dojo too far from where you stayed ?

Nicolas

Ron Tisdale
05-01-2006, 11:01 AM
It was very far (Paris is huge!) but it was worth making the time to do it. We climbed to the top of Notre Damme earlier that day, and drove to that section of Paris from where we had parked. It's far from Elancourt, or I would have gone back a second time. Great folks, great keiko.

Best,
Ron

siwilson
05-01-2006, 02:26 PM
Hi All!

I'm back from France, and what a great trip! I have a review of my experience training with Pat Guerri Sensei one stormy night in Paris, which I'll post as soon as I can. Gotta catch up on email! To all who contributed to the thread, thanks! and sorry I couldn't get to more dojo. To the people who recommended Guerri Sensei, Domo Arigato...

Best,
Ron

Damn, damn, damn, damn, damn, damn, damn........

Ron, I wish I knew you would be in Europe! I am sitting here enjoying the post seminar ache of 2 days with Robert Mustard Sensei!!!!! It was so close, you could have linked it in, and I could have met you! Southern England is a short hop.

It was a ball and the UK Yoshinkan groups really were lucky to see him. It turns out it was his first visit to Europe! And what a top bloke!

Glad you enjoyed the trip, Paris is lovely.

Osu!

Si

Ron Tisdale
05-01-2006, 02:52 PM
April in Paris.....

Man, what a bummer. I wouldn't have had time to get there anyway...GF would have killed me. She was very gracious as it was to translate for me and to get me to training that one night in the thunderstorm. Finding the dojo was certainly fun...the GPS kept going out on the way there.

Mustard Sensei is kick-@$$. I know you had a great time. Damn, I miss training with him!

Best,
Ron

siwilson
05-01-2006, 10:17 PM
Mustard Sensei is kick-@$$. I know you had a great time. Damn, I miss training with him!

Yeah, he is cool. I am lucky with who I get the chance to train with - the mountain keeps on coming to Mohammad or meeting half way!

I hope to meet you some day soon and possibly at a Yoshinkan event. Chida Sensei is in Germany and Poland later in the year, and Terada Sensei is in Poland again with Matsuo Sensei and Chizuko Matsuo Sensei!!!

I would be happy to host you any time and I can take you to train with my Sensei, Garry Masters Sensei. :)

All the best,

Si

Ron Tisdale
05-03-2006, 11:03 AM
I just finished writing the review of my training at Asahi dojo...

Review of a Keiko with Patricia Guerri Sensei
6th Dan under Morihiro Saito Sensei
Holder of 5 Mokuroku of Aiki Buki

While I was in Paris for 10 days, I had the pleasure of training one night with Guerri Sensei and her students at the Asahi dojo of the Aiki Bukikai. I have only trained once before with a school affiliated with Iwama Aikido, and the experience in that case was very mixed. While the Aikido I saw then was strong, the lack of control of the instructor and his attitude toward and badmouthing of other styles and instructors left a bad taste in my mouth. I later discovered that that school's connection to Iwama was somewhat tenuous, and not something to be taken as representative. In spite of the fact that Philadelphia has a wide variety of aikido styles, Iwama is not well represented in the area. People should keep in mind that I was very new to aikido then, and view my judgment accordingly. So when I learned I was going to France, and I knew that Europe is a hotbed for Iwama training well connected to both Saito Sr. and his son, I decided that the opportunity was not to be missed.

In my search for a place to train, Nicolas Delalondre and Olivier Ledru on www.aikiweb.com recommended the Asahi dojo. I had read about Guerri Sensei on www.aikidojournal.com, as well one of the posters there was wondering why she was not more well known. Guerri Sensei mentioned that she had run a public dojo for sometime, but got frustrated with always trying to solicit students and keep enrollments up, and I assume some other things as well. Now she basically runs a private dojo, one that is obviously open to visitors though. I believe that is why she is rather less well known than some other Iwama stylists of similar rank and credentials. From what I saw, I have to say I think she made the right choice. Her students show the results of focused, dedicated training under someone who does not tolerate any nonsense. While not completely familiar with the setup in France, I can see obvious benefits of Guerri Sensei being true to herself and to the legacy that Saito Sensei gave her.

Finding the dojo was a challenge…my girlfriend hadn't driven in Paris for some time, and we were coming from a day of site seeing in another section of the city, which included the 750 stairs up (and back down) Notre Dame. My bad knee did not appreciate all of those stairs! The GPS kept losing satellite connection, so it took us a while to get to the dojo. My girlfriend let me jump out at the dojo sign to get changed while she parked the car about 15 minutes away. The actual entrance is back off the street in an alley, and I wasn't sure just where to enter…but I could hear sounds like children practicing aikido, so I asked a woman waiting for her child, and she pointed me to the right door. I ran in, introduced myself (gratefully finding some English speakers), changed and got on the mat.

Keiko

We started right off with Katetori Tenkan, and right away the differences in posture, Atemi, and the feel of the technique showed. I believe because of the focus on developing Kokyu Ryoku, the first thing you notice is the way they tilt the hips. It's as if when standing with your tailbone tucked so that it goes toward your front, you then tilt the pelvis, which brings the tailbone back, but lowers your center. Unlike the Yoshinkan, which also does a similar tilt, there seems to be a more bent over posture of the upper body, while we seem to try to keep one line from the heel of the back foot to the top of the head. Instead of the hip tilt being in line with the whole body, they seem to have a break in the upper body. I'm not sure why this is…perhaps with more Iwama based training I'll be able to figure it out. It may be the difference between keeping our weight forward in the Yoshinkan, while in the Iwama style; the weight seems to be more on the back foot.

When this posture is combined with the movement of the fingers toward your own center during the pivot, fingers slightly higher than the palm, it seems to transfer the weight of your body down into Uke in a very powerful way. That, combined with an Atemi with the middle knuckle to the temple/face, really serves well to off-balance Uke. This exercise is done without Uke pushing or pulling. Static grabs seemed to be the norm for the training that night, and, as I understand it, for most of the basic (Kihon) training. The power of the exercises and Waza stood out throughout the training that evening.

Most of the Te-Waza we did that night I recognized in one fashion or another. The Katatetori attack was common throughout, again, focusing on strong static grabs as opposed to pushing or pulling. Katatetori Kokyunage was done more as an exercise than a throw, giving me a good chance to stretch out a bit. Katatetori Iriminage was done in two ways; one stripping the grip by turning the fingers away from Uke, palm down, and cutting with the free hand, then pulling Uke toward you as you enter, then cutting at the base of the spine with the throw. The other version was done by entering and taking a Shiho grip with the hand that was seized, and throwing Irimi with the other hand. I was working with a smaller, female Uke, and her power on the throws was superb, along with her control. I'm sure she must have been with Guerri Sensei a long time, perhaps her senior student. She really models her teacher's posture and power well.

Shihonage Omote and Ura (Ichi and Ni) were next up, and followed the basic patterns I am familiar with. One thing I really liked was the emphasis on cutting out, then throwing with a shuffle forward. For safety (I believe), it was always done in two separate movements, but done as one movement it would be a very powerful way to throw with Shiho.

One treat was to try one version of their style of Koshinage. From Katatetori on Shite's right hand, they entered with Atemi to their right, then stepped between Uke's legs and made a cross with the body bent from the hips, the free hand almost touching the floor, and the grasped hand held high. To throw, they simply turned the hips and switched the hands. Very nice, and again very powerful, though I'm not sure I did it very well, not being used to that particular version. One interesting note … a lot of styles I've seen have Uke grab the Dogi at the chest on this throw. They grab the sleeve instead, which removes the concern I always have when grabbing female partners in the chest area. Mistakes here can be very embarrassing for both partners, as well as somewhat painful in a few cases. Hint: Never annoy your Shite just before Koshinage!

I also liked the series taught on Kotegaishi. It was done in several stages, a throw straight down, turn Uke for a standing pin, then finish with a kneeling Nikkyo / Nikkajo pin. I think I'm forgetting one Waza that I can't quite place my finger on…oh well. Wait…got it! My favorite Waza for the night is one I don't know the name for. It was an Irimi technique, where instead of throwing you enter behind Uke and seize the neck in a wrap around choke, shift your hips forward for a tap, then step back bringing Uke to your knee to complete the choke. It is a very powerful standing and kneeling pin for submissions. I really like this one.

Buki Waza

I don't have as much detail on the weapons work, because even though the Doshinkan retains the emphasis on Buki Waza, it's still not my strong point. But I was really impressed by the form and detail, as well as the power development from what I saw. The Buki Waza class was on the Jo. The postures I saw in the empty hand forms were the same with the Buki Waza. The practice (about 1/3 of the total class time) focused first on basic strikes and thrusts, with great attention to detail on the hand position, movement off the line, Hasuji, Awase and power generation. On many of the movements, Sensei would call the senior student up and show the application with a partner so that we knew why certain movements were important when training with a partner. Proper control was stressed through out this practice, even before paired practice. This stress on safety and control was very impressive. Even during the empty hand practice (which contained very powerful throws) safety was repeatedly stressed. In the Buki Waza, safety was stressed even more. From my girl friend's translation, Sensei emphasized that lack of control and injuries resulting from it would not be tolerated AT ALL. This stands in direct contradiction to an earlier experience that I mentioned before, where I saw an instructor strike a student in the chest with a full power Tsuki that took Uke off of his feet.

The Suburi we did was very interesting. I have read before about the way that Iwama stylists vibrate the Bokken at the tip when cutting. I had always heard that this was incorrect according to classical weapons work, and even the weapons work in Doshinkan Aikido. Even though we were working with the Jo (and perhaps emphasized because of it), I could see how the power generation of the Kokyu posture was creating a shaking power at the tip of the Jo. The neat thing was that even though I could not control this shaking power to the extent that the seniors there did, I could generate it. I believe I will begin to practice on my own to build this power and the control of it during Suburi with the Jo (being mindful not to let any non-standard habits creep into my training at the Doshinkan). I also noticed that we indeed did take the Jo all the way behind the back during the Suburi. I had always been taught this was bad form in partnered weapons practiced, as it leaves a huge Suki (opening). But in the context of Suburi, it was obvious that this was intended to build the range of motion and power. I will have to ask Ellis Amdur to be sure, but I believe even some Koryu schools practice Suburi this way. I think I remember us doing this with the bokken in the beginning of his six hours of Toda Ha Buko Ryu Keiko. People often speak of the differences between Aikido Buki Waza and Koryu training. In this case, I could truly see the link between the Suburi power generation and the empty hand Waza. It reminded me to a great extent of the idea of Riai that John Stevens mentions when talking about the connection of the Bokken and Jo to Aikido.

The Jo Awase paired kata we did after the Kihon practice was fantastic. The power on the strikes and thrusts felt really good, and my partners were safe and controlled. I had a hard time not moving away from some of the thrusts where one side or another ‘won' … even with the emphasis on safety, when working with new partners, it's hard to accept the Tsuki without moving just out of range. But Sensei insisted on it, and I finally got my body to comply. Not one person missed and struck their partner, but all of the Tsuki were powerful, focused, and targeted properly. This was fantastic training, and I could have continued for another half hour just to polish it enough to remember in detail. Unfortunately, even when trying to write it down several hours after class, I was unable to recall it in enough detail.

After bowing out, I was fortunate to spend some time doing Kokyu Ho Dosa with one of the Yudansha. We shared some of the differences in the methods from the Yoshinkan and Iwama styles, and some of the similarities as well. In the Yoshinkan we have a series of 10 Kokyu Ho Dosa. The first three methods are with a pull, a push, and a hold. Apparently the Iwama schools use static holds only for their Kokyu Ho Dosa, and it was interesting to see components of our number three against a hold in their work.

I would like to thank Patricia Guerri Sensei for allowing me to share training with the Asahi dojo that night, to thank the students who trained with me, and especially her senior student who partnered with me and helped me through out the night (if any of you can tell me her name, please do). I was treated like a true guest, and a welcome member of the Aikido family. In all my time visiting other dojo, it is remarkably rare that they specifically ask me for criticism when they hear that I write reviews of my training. Guerri Sensei did this, and I wish I could have some positive criticism for her. But to be truthful, there really isn't any. Her students show her dedication to the Aikido she learned from Saito Sensei. There can be no greater recognition to her teacher than that. While I might have a different focus for my own training, and preferences that result from that focus, it says nothing negative about the training I saw that night. I do personally like to "romp" a bit more freely, but there is always at least a small sacrifice of power and form when I do that…for safety reasons and because that's what often happens in a more free form environment. In my mind, staying with the Kihon in her dojo is worth it. And perhaps they do more of that in regular training when they don't have a visitor new to their style. I give my best regards to Guerri Sensei and her students. If any of you ever come to the States, please come and visit Philadelphia, and train with me at the Doshinkan Dojo.

I would also like to thank Yukio Utada Sensei of the Doshinkan for having prepared me so well that I can train with so many different styles without problems.

Best to all,
Ron Tisdale

Mark Freeman
05-03-2006, 11:26 AM
Great review Ron, I can't imagine anywhere not welcoming you to train with them, your honesty and integrity are evident in your words.

regards,

Mark

N. Delalondre
05-03-2006, 11:28 AM
For safety (I believe), it was always done in two separate movements, but done as one movement it would be a very powerful way to throw with Shiho.


Hey you're right, Sensei always reminds us to take care of uke and break a bit shihonage for safety

My favorite Waza for the night is one I don't know the name for.

For us, this is an henka waza on kokyu nage; I realy love this one. If it was that one, I think you start in kokyu nage (like on katate dori or morotedori) and then get the neck...

if any of you can tell me her name, please do

Isabelle for sure...

I'm happy that you like your keiko, hope I'll have a chance to meet you another day :)

Nicolas

Ron Tisdale
05-03-2006, 11:33 AM
Isabelle was such a pleasure to train with. Rarely have I found someone of her size who demonstrated so much power. She is a credit to her teacher.

The henka waza on kokyunage...cool stuff. We call kokyunage like that Sokomen Iriminage, and I have done that variation off of that and other entering movements before. I really like it!

I hope I was able to give your school the proper credit with my poor words.

Best,
Ron (thanks for the compliment Mark, I'll try harder to live up to it)

N. Delalondre
05-03-2006, 11:37 AM
I hope I was able to give your school the proper credit with my poor words.

I'm sure you did ;) you made such a review ! He he, are you writing down all details during the keiko to be able to do this ?

Ron Tisdale
05-03-2006, 11:41 AM
;) No, I take notes as soon afterward as I can, in this case, after going out to Elancourt through that tunnel that got flooded during the rainstorm! Man, what a traffic jam that was. I just wish I could remember more of the specifics in the jo awase paired kata. Guess I'm gettin old...

Best,
Ron

NagaBaba
05-03-2006, 08:12 PM
Ron, you are fantastic writer. It push me to write my own review from Japan, once I recover from a vacation shock .

Ron Tisdale
05-04-2006, 07:48 AM
Thank you for the kind words! I'm waiting to hear about your time in Japan, but I do understand vacation shock! ;)
B,
R

Ron Tisdale
05-07-2006, 05:24 PM
Sorry that I don't have any pictures from training, but here is a shot of Mount St. Michelle.
Best,
Ron