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Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > AikiWeb AikiBlogs > Seeking Zanshin: Blood, Sweat, Tears & Aikikai

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Seeking Zanshin: Blood, Sweat, Tears & Aikikai Blog Tools Rating: Rate This Blog
Creation Date: 02-24-2005 11:53 PM
jducusin
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One small gal + a dojo full of big guys = tons o' fun
Blog Info
Status: Public
Entries: 270 (Private: 12)
Comments: 195
Views: 628,769

In General Trying to Find My Aikido Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #144 New 08-03-2004 10:17 PM
It is with a substantial amount of relief that I can still say how, thankfully, work may have been keeping me from writing in my journal lately, but not so much from actual training. Just a little over a month remains until I will cross myself off the dojo attendance chart for the "hell week" that will be my work's conference...we'll have to see in the coming weeks whether or not I can still hold out going to class as often as I am.

Tonight, we worked mostly on Tsuki Ikkyo - tech notes (as usual):
- for omote, need to move forward before turning at the hips
- for ura, need to keep forward pressure through turn (as in irimi tenkan)
- for both, need to make sure uke's fist is in front of centre during opening move, and not too far away

Lately, we've been incorporating at the end of almost every class 10-15 minutes or so of slow Randori in pairs: we take turns as uke attacking randomly ten times. It's been a nice way to apply (well, in theory, hehe...) what we've learned, though I'm still of course at the point where there is a very limited repertoire I'm able to draw from; it's a bit of a rut, remembering only a few techniques in response to certain attacks. I do know, however, that this is simply because these are techniques we've done so often and that this repertoire will increase with time and experience.

As I go along, I find myself conflicted --- well, perhaps "conflicted" isn't the right word --- more like struggling to "find my Aikido". I know that how I perform a technique greatly depends upon the attacker, and adapting to his force...but I do also realize that these days, I have a tendency to react differently depending upon the particular uke himself, specifically with the bias of what I know of his strength, physique, or tolerance to pain. I know that I need to shake this bias in order to train more realistically and effectively --- approach each uke as a kind of "blank slate" and adapt purely to their energy and not to what I believe they are capable of handling.

In essence, I need to develop consistency with how I approach and perform technique; an unbiased reaction to each attack based on my own capabilities and whatever uke may present to me at any given moment. I suppose that this bias of mine is due to training with the same small number ukes so often, and perhaps as a result, I am getting too comfortable with their idiosyncrasies; that the more and more I train with a wider variety of ukes, the less and less I will subconciously rely upon my prior knowledge of how they will react to technique. Also, I'm assuming that the better I get with technique itself through long years of practice, the more easily I will come to adapt "on the fly" without really having to think about it.


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