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Rumpf's Blog Blog Tools Rate This Blog
Creation Date: 04-14-2005 07:45 AM
Robert Rumpf
Offline
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Thoughts that I don't want to forget.
Blog Info
Status: Public
Entries: 143 (Private: 73)
Comments: 19
Views: 92,481

In General Response to comment Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #131 New 06-26-2007 12:45 PM
What I was talking about was this... I was taught this weekend about the series of movements for bringing down at sword cut in shomenuchi, and it completely changed my thoughts on weapons cutting.

Specifically, when I had brought the sword up in the past, I had either brought it to the top of my head with the blade standing almost straight up (to keep an eye out for those behind me), or what I had thought was correct in that the tsuba was flat, and the blade mostly horizontal.

In all of this, most of the motion was from my wrist and shoulder.

So what I have been taught this weekend was that I need to bring the tsuba of the blade up higher, to let the grip of my left hands little fingers relax, and let the blade lean down at an angle somewhat, while thrusting the tsuba high.

Then, when I cut, there is a clear sequence of movements.
  • Left pinky contracts
  • Left ring finger contracts
  • ...
  • Left thumb contracts
  • Left wrist drops and extends
  • Left elbow drops and extends
  • Left shoulder arm drops through and out of shoulders

Likewise with the right hand.

So what I'm saying is that I didn't realize that the left pinky finger starts the cut. I had been keeping a solid grip throughout, and so ruining the motion.

Keep in mind that this is something I need to think about more, and to work more into my cutting.... In addition, this has many implications for jo practice as well.

I may not be expressing this correctly, and it may be that next week's class will bring more surprises, or kill today's understandings.
Views: 912 | Comments: 2


RSS Feed 2 Responses to "Response to comment"
#2 06-26-2007 01:41 PM
Robert Rumpf Says:
Yes, that was another comment I've been getting - that I should be pushing up via the bottom hand with power coming from the hara. Again, not what I've been doing.
#1 06-26-2007 01:17 PM
Jonshez Says:
It's great when that happens and it completely changes what you had understood before. I saw something similar with bokken - when raising the sword for the shomen cut I was beginning the movement with my right bicep (kind of). I saw a video from Tohei Sensei where the raising of the sword seemed to begin with a pivot from the left hand forwards 'pushing' the hilt out rather than lifting the tsuba up through the right arm (no idea if that makes sense to anyone but me!). Thanks for sharing, Jon
 




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