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Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > AikiWeb AikiBlogs > Mary Eastland's Blog

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Mary Eastland's Blog Blog Tools Rate This Blog
Creation Date: 08-29-2009 04:57 AM
Mary Eastland
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Blog Info
Status: Public
Entries: 67
Comments: 42
Views: 123,933

In General uke should..... Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #63 New 02-06-2017 02:54 PM
When the judgments pop up on the mat what can we do about them?

You know what I mean, sometimes in my head I hear "you (meaning me) suck", or "uke (meaning you) should relax more or follow better" and so onů.

None of the above is conducive to blending or correct feeling. So what I do is notice the thought, feel the feeling and keep training. My experience is that the process of noticing, feeling and continued training works very effectively. I am not wasting any time or energy denying or minimizing my negative self-talk. I am not building a case against uke by focusing on what I think is wrong with them.

Usually for me, those kind of thoughts are proceeded or followed by an uncomfortable feeling.

So I breathe in deeply, I exhale fully and wait my turn, then I do the next thing I am supposed to be doing, whether it is bokken movement, attacking my nage of throwing my uke. I pay very close attention to what I am supposed to be doing and before I know it my mind is clear again and my spirit flies free.

I can't control what my mind thinks initially.

I can respond in a powerful way by being present with my thoughts and feelings, letting them pass and focusing on the task at hand.
Views: 936 | Comments: 3


RSS Feed 3 Responses to "uke should....."
#3 02-19-2017 11:22 AM
Uke is uke. How I feel when I throw helps me learn about me. I like to watch and learn and feel and learn. Thank you for your response.
#2 02-17-2017 02:29 AM
Cass Says:
But what you have said about being mindful of your feelings and thoughts but letting them pass rather than seize your focus - I think this is key. I don't think anyone can help certain thoughts and preferences. Some I think are easier to let go depending on their "mental" or "physical" nature. But ultimately not blaming yourself for thinking something and just letting it pass is a good approach. Thanks for the post 2/2
#1 02-17-2017 02:29 AM
Cass Says:
I found this a very helpful line of thought. Lately I have been getting a bit hung up on the "undesirable uke/nage". I find it pollutes my mindset when I train with them because I am immediately anticipating a bad experience and let it linger afterwards. Afterwards I feel guilty that I am too vested in the other person's "problems" when I should be trying to focus on myself. 1/2
 




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