Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > AikiWeb AikiBlogs > chris wright's Blog

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

chris wright's Blog Blog Tools Rate This Blog
Creation Date: 06-08-2010 02:22 AM
chris wright
Offline
rss2
'My stumbling step along the winding path'
Blog Info
Status: Public
Entries: 28
Comments: 55
Views: 52,600

In General Learning through teaching... Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #2 New 06-09-2010 02:24 AM
Last night Sensei had me and Dave (my Sempai) teaching the class, Dave is much better at teaching than i am. I'm hoping that improvement and confidence will develop with experience.
2 Issues gave me pause for thought....

1) How often should Sensei, interrupt a students practice to make corrections, obviously wrong arm / leg / technique, should be corrected straight away, but should you allow the students to 'feel' their mistakes and make their own corrections, without Sensei constantly jumping in ?

2) I noticed, (not for the first time) the difference between what Sensei has demonstrated and what the students are actually doing, students (and i'll add myself here too) fall back into 'perceived' patterns of movement rather than what has been shown, last night for example Sensei taught a slight variation of Sankyo - yet students were not picking up on these changes..........i wonder why this happens?

These points are now making me think of my own techniques and making sure that i don't fall into 'routine patterns of habit'
and also how many mistakes i'm making before Sensei comes over to correct me................................
Views: 1124 | Comments: 4


RSS Feed 4 Responses to "Learning through teaching..."
#4 06-10-2010 05:28 PM
niall Says:
Hi Chris. Yes everything flows from a relaxed natural posture. Your training diary is a useful tool - I'm impressed you've kept it so regularly. You can remember a lot about a lesson even from years ago with some trigger words. Cheers, Niall.
#3 06-10-2010 04:23 AM
chris wright Says:
Hi Niall, thanks for the comments. I've kept a 'physical' training diary since day 1 (7 years ago now) every lesson and course is in there, i find it very useful to look back on and use it for revision. I've noticed posture & footwork are points at where we ( i'll add myself here) are missing & movement & timing. Last week Sensei made the comment that posture is our 'cake' and everything else (i.e. waza) is the icing..... I thought that was interesting. Best Wishes Always Chris
#2 06-09-2010 03:18 AM
niall Says:
(continued) The point about letting students feel their mistakes and make their own progress is much more subtle and it will depend on the student as well as on the specific point. Some things lend themselves to self-analysis/discovery; others might never be noticed without a suggestion from the teacher. Question 2: yeah we've got to learn to see what the teacher really did, not what we think he/she did.
#1 06-09-2010 03:17 AM
niall Says:
Great questions Chris. They show you're thinking about your aikido seriously. Your blog can function as a training diary. Question 1: as a teacher you don't want to let an incorrect habit go unremarked but you don't want to overload the student with too much information either. So one piece of advice is often enough for each technique, maybe sometimes two. And of course don't forget to ask your teacher for advice about teaching!
 




All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:04 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate